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FET-Open in FP7 - Frequently Asked Questions

For ease of use, we have compiled a frequently asked questions list below. While we will endeavour to keep this information up to date, readers are reminded that the information provided here does not supersede the official rules and conditions laid out for FP7 and the guidelines and documents which cover officially the FET-Open call. In case of any ambiguity, error or oversimplification inadvertently introduced below, the official documents will prevail. Therefore readers should not regard these views as a statement of the official position of the European Commission or the FET-Open scheme.

Questions and answers are classified into a number of sections below. Click on each of them for further information.

Building a consortium

Which is the minimum number of partners that is necessary to constitute an eligible consortium?
For collaborative projects (STREPs): At least three legal entities (defined as organisations or individual researchers as above) must participate, each of which is established in a Member State or Associated country, and no two of which are established in the same Member State or Associated country. All three legal entities must be independent of each other in accordance with Article 6 of the RFP, meaning they are not subsidiaries of the same organisation or of each other.
For coordination and support actions (CSAs), the minimum condition is the participation of one legal entity. For more information on the conditions for participating in FP7, see here .

Can legal entities from non-EU or from non-associated countries participate in a proposal?
Yes. Provided that the FP7 Rules for Participation are respected (i.e. the minimum requirements to constitute an eligible consortium), legal entitles from these countries can participate as a full partner.

Can legal entities from non-EU or from non-associated countries receive funding from the FET-Open scheme?
Yes. A legal entity from a non-EU or non-associated country can receive funding from the ICT program, provided it is part of an eligible consortium as defined in the FP7 Rules for Participation and provided the need for its participation is duly justified and in the interest of the proposal. For partners from non-EU, non-associated countries which are also outside of the International Cooperation (INCO) target area , funding is decided on a case-by-case basis.

Is it mandatory for consortia to include an industrial partner?
No. It is not mandatory for consortia to include an industrial partner although some consortia do include, for example, a high-tech SME as a project partner. In FET-Open, such SME partners would normally be very actively involved in the research work. In cases where the SME partner or partners are planning to drive the research work, proposers are asked to consider submitting to the FET-Open specific call targeting high-tech research intensive SMEs .

Can a consortium be modified between the short and full STREP proposal?
Yes. Following the successful evaluation of a short STREP proposal, and provided the nature of the proposal is not changed, the composition of the consortium can be modified before the submission of the full proposal. Of course, the resulting consortia will need to meet the formal eligibility requirements.

How should I deal with distinct institutes from the same university?
For both short and full proposals, Part A of the proposal should list distinct institutes from the same university (i.e. belonging to the same legal entity) only once. For short proposals, Part B is anonymous so no names of proposers or beneficiaries are present. For full proposals, distinct institutes from the same legal entity can be listed separately in the Part B of the proposal. If a full proposal is retained for negotiation in view of signing a grant agreement, such institutes will be treated as the same legal entity.

Preparing and submitting a proposal

How can I be sure that my short proposal idea fits within the FET-Open scheme?
Current experience shows that short proposals submitted to FET-OPEN have no chances of success in the following cases:
1. Your proposal addresses an incremental advance of the state-of-the-art in ICT, rather than a breakthrough.
2. Your proposal does not address an emerging scientific discipline in ICT. An emerging scientific discipline is one in which not much is currently known and the bulk needs still to be discovered.
3. You are submitting to the FET-OPEN scheme simply because there is no call currently open which would be more relevant for your type of research.
4. No scientific research is described in your proposal.
5. Your proposal does not focus on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) related research, e.g. ICT technology is only a tool for your research and in reality the proposal targets a different area.
6. Your proposal addresses a problem which is likely to be solved in the short term.
7. Your proposal reacts to and offers a solution to an immediate market need.
8. You submitted a similar proposal to another ICT call, but you were unsuccessful for reasons other than your research being too long-term oriented.
9. Your proposal does not provide enough information to judge expected progress with respect to the state-of-the-art.
10. For the young explorers or high-tech research intensive SME schemes, inadequate fit with the specific requirements of the respective theme.
Why not test your short proposal idea with us before submitting it by contacting our test your idea service. We offer specific feedback on all open calls. Please visit the dedicated pages for each call on the FET-Open web site for further information – Challenging Currently ThinkingHigh-Tech Research Intensive SMEs in FET ResearchFET Young Explorers?

How does FET-Open define "breakthrough"?
In FET-Open we are looking for breakthroughs, the result of which may constitute a defining moment for the future of ICT science or society. A breakthrough has a " before " – composed perhaps of limits, constraints, inefficiencies in technology, difficult problems, doubts etc. – an " ah-ha moment " in which a significant breakthrough occurs, and an " after " - in which some aspects of the future of ICT science or its impact on science or society are suddenly clearer. A breakthrough typically represents a qualitative leap forward in terms of thinking or results. Thanks to a breakthrough, something important exists that did not exist before. Typically, an important enough ICT breakthrough might unleash a wave of energy, activity and enthusiasm within the research community, or within society at large. A breakthrough can open the door to sudden clarity, or to a whole set of new and interesting questions which were not known or not apparent before the breakthrough occurred.

What does Part B anonymity mean at the short stage?
FET-Open applies an eligibility criteria that short proposal Part B must be fully anonymous. Anonymity means that Part B must be strictly anonymous, which means that there must be neither name of the organizations involved in the consortium nor any other information that could identify the applicants. Furthermore, strictly no bibliographic references are allowed in the proposal . An eligibility check is carried out systematically on all short proposals received. Any proposal found not to comply with anonymity requirements is automatically marked as ineligible and is not evaluated.

How can I clarify the expertise of the partners involved in the short proposal, while at the same time maintaining anonymity?
When you describe your approach and scientific methodology you will naturally need to describe the areas of knowledge that you will intertwine in this. That is where you can hint at the specific competencies of the beneficiaries involved, without naming anybody of course. So, think of it as a methodology aspect. In case you bring together disciplines that have not worked together before, it really helps to think and explain concretely how you are going to achieve something other than 'inspiring each other'.

Are templates available for STREP proposals, short and full?
Templates exist for the administrative information (Part A of the proposal). For Part B, proposers are invited to follow either a free text format, or to follow a sample template which maps on to the evaluation criteria. This sample template can be found in Annex 4B of the Guide for Applicants (for short STREP proposals), and Annex 4B (for full strep proposals).

What is the final deadline for submitting proposals to FET-Open?
FET-Open operates a continuous call for short STREP proposals. Therefore, there is no particular deadline, except that of the end of the funding period for FP7. Short proposals which are evaluated successfully and invited to submit a full proposal are informed of the deadline for receipt of this full proposal, which is typically around 2 months after notification of success at the short proposal stage. Full proposals which are not submitted within this deadline lose the right to submit at a later stage.

Is paper submission possible?
No. Since 5 January 2005, all proposals have to be submitted online using the Electronic Proposal Submission System (EPSS) tool.

Do I need to pre-register my proposal?
No. With the obligation to submit your proposal online with the EPSS tool, a pre-registration is no longer necessary and has been disabled.

Who has to fill in the A forms?
All partners have to fill in an A2 form (contact details of the partner), even for short STREP proposals. The coordinator in addition has to fill in the A1 form (title page) and A3 form (budget breakdown).

Do I have to sign the A2 forms?
No, the A forms do not have to be signed. Online submission is considered to be a signed document, submitted by the coordinator with the agreement of the proposal’s consortium.

For a short STREP proposal, is it OK to only submit part B, or should I also submit part A, with forms for each partner?
Although the evaluation of the short proposal is anonymous, a complete proposal must be submitted, comprising a Part-A (administrative forms) with one A2 form per partner. The evaluators only receive the anonymous Part B and an anonymised version of Form A3 (budget breakdown).

For the short proposal, do I need to complete all the columns of Form A3, with all the details of the planned costs per partner?
Yes.

Can I cite references in the annex of Part B of a short STREP proposal?
No. Proposers need to be careful not to inadvertently make a proposal ineligible. It is a strict eligibility criteria that Part B must be anonymous. Anonymity means that Part B must be strictly anonymous, which means that there must be neither name of the organizations involved in the consortium nor any other information that could identify the applicants. Furthermore, strictly no bibliographic references are allowed in the proposal . An eligibility check is carried out systematically on all short proposals received. Any proposal found not to comply with anonymity requirements is automatically marked as ineligible and is not evaluated.

Can I view some examples online of successful proposals?
No, all submitted proposals are confidential; therefore we can not provide you with samples of successful proposals. You can visit the FET-Open Project Portfolio to view information on selected running projects.

Are proposers expected to mention effort figures in the short proposal Part B?
No, proposers are not expected to mention effort figures in the Part B.

Do I need to use the same userid and password that I received from the EPSS system for my short proposal when I am invited to submit a full proposal?
When you are invited to submit a full proposal you will receive the login and password to use when preparing and submitting your full proposal via the EPSS system. Your account for the short proposal will in fact be reactivated at this stage.

Modifying a submitted proposal

Can a proposal be modified?
Once a proposal has been officially submitted, it cannot be modified.

Can the consortium involved in a proposal be modified between the short and full STREP stages?
Following the successful evaluation of a short STREP proposal and providing that the nature of the proposal remains unchanged, the composition of a consortium can be modified before the submission of a full proposal. Of course, the resulting consortia will need to meet the formal eligibility requirements.

Can the budget be modified between the short and full STREP proposal?
Following the successful evaluation of the short STREP proposal, the budget figures of the consortium can be modified before the submission of the full proposal, e.g. to reflect a change in partnership or to accommodate the recommendations of the evaluators.

Questions relating to funding

Can the requested budget be modified between the short and full STREP proposal?
Following the successful evaluation of the short STREP proposal, the budget figures of the consortium can be modified before the submission of the full proposal, e.g. to reflect a change in partnership or to accommodate the recommendations of the evaluators.

Can legal entities from non-EU or from non-associated countries receive funding from the FET-Open scheme?
Yes. A legal entity from a non-EU or non-associated country can receive funding from the ICT program, provided it is part of an eligible consortium as defined in the FP7 Rules for Participation and provided the need for its participation is duly justified and in the interest of the proposal. For partners from non-EU, non-associated countries which are also outside of the International Cooperation (INCO) target area , funding is decided on a case-by-case basis.

Which costs are eligible for funding?
Costs charged to a project must be necessary for the project and follow the principles of economy, efficiency and effectiveness to be eligible. For further information, see the Guide to Financial Issues relating to FP7 Indirect Actions .

What is the allowed level for management costs?
There is no ceiling for management costs in FP7.

What is the allowed duration of a STREP project?
The duration of a project is determined by its research objectives and their implementation. Typically the duration of a STREP project in FET-Open is 2-3 years. Only exceptionally and in duly justified cases would the duration exceed 3 years.

What is the allowed requested funding of a STREP project?
The project costs and the amount of funding requested from the FET-Open scheme depend on the planned duration of the project, the number of participants, the specific research objectives, the geographic origin of the partners, etc… As a guideline, the average requested funding is around 1.6 M€ for a 3 years project involving 6 partners. In exceptional cases, some projects have received more than 2.0 M € in funding. The budget indicated in a proposal should reflect real costs. At an evaluation, a proposal typically under- or over-sizing its budget with unjustified or unreflected costs is often penalised under the criterion “Implementation”.
For the Young Explorers call: project funding will typically be in the 1.0 M € range.

Proposal evaluation

Where can I find out the status of the evaluation of my SHORT proposal?
FET-Open applies a continuous evaluation scheme for short proposals. You can check the status of your proposal in the FET-Open short evaluation at any time.

How long does a typical evaluation take?
For short STREP proposals, the indicative duration of the evaluation from submission is 8 weeks. This duration can vary upwards or downwards slightly depending on the availability of evaluators and on the total number of proposals under evaluation at any one time. Once the evaluation has concluded the results are sent to proposers without further delay. For full STREP and CA proposals the indicative duration of the evaluation taken from the cut-off date is 8 weeks. In the case of full STREP and CA proposals, the evaluation result is not communicated to proposers before the relevant services of the European Commission and the management committee have been informed of the results.

Specific questions relating to the High-tech Research Intensive SMEs call

Readers are asked to read also the full list of frequently asked questions in case of further doubts. If despite this, your question has still not been answered please contact us.

Where can I find the information on the high-tech research intensive SMEs call?
Your first point of call should be our dedicated FET-Open high-tech research intensive SME web pages in the FET-Open web site, which provide basic overview information. You can also consult the FET Work Programme for 2011-2012 (the high-tech research intensive SME track call text is on page 5 and the criteria on 21-22). Please note that this call is not designed to support just any kind of SME. It has a specific purpose. So you should carefully read the call text and the introduction to FET and FET-Open .Further documents and guides relating to all FET-Open calls can be downloaded from the FET-Open call page . Note that a proposal template is included in the Guide for Applicants document which is available here. Keep in mind that the proposal needs to be written in light of the specific call text of objective ICT-2011.9.2. Submission is only through an on-line system called EPSS .

The WP specifically mentions "high-tech research intensive SMEs in a driving role". What specifically is meant by "driving role"? Is it coordinator or WP leader or simply to be a main contributor in a number of the work packages?
The core project objectives should be aligned with the mission of the involved SME. But we do not aim to see SME beneficiaries in a providing role. Nor do we see this call as a model or way for SMEs involved to outsource research needs. On the contrary, we are looking for high-tech research intensive SMEs that will do significant parts of the research themselves, in collaboration with their partners . In these projects the high-tech research intensive SME will bring advanced research competence, and also benefit by being the 'sponges' that absorb new knowledge and competences generated collectively to prepare for their next big step. In practice this will definitely translate into leadership of key work packages with deliverables from collaborative research that are a direct and obvious contribution to the company's knowledge assets.

What are the requirements for building an eligible consortium for this call?
The consortium must contain at least three partners from three different EU-member states or associated countires. In addition, the consortium must contain at least one SME.

What does the following mean "funding in the order of EUR 1 million where the largest share of the resources is allocated to the participating SMEs"?
The funding to the SME should exceed the funding to any other individual partner. Funding allocated to the SME should clearly be in keeping with its driving role in setting and executing the research agenda of the project.

Does the SME need to coordinate the proposal or would its participation be sufficient?
It is not mandatory for the high-tech research intensive SME to coordinate the proposal, although it may be a strong signal of commitment if it did so. In any case, it has to be clear that the project is done because to satisfy the future needs of the SME. Successful proposals will demonstrate that the work is done for the SME and to a large degree with strong research involvement of the SME (which is why it is required that they take the biggest slice of the funding) so that they can both give and absorb as much research competence as possible during the project. One would also hope that the high-tech research intensive SMEs involved would hire some new research staff to acquire the new competences (as a side effect).

This call is targeting high-tech research intensive SMEs, but the guide for applicants stresses that part B should be totally anonymous. How can we identify our SME in the short proposal?
Indeed, the short proposal is anonymous, so you cannot mention the name or otherwise identify the SME. Your short proposal will be declared ineligible if any partner can be identified (see also separate questions in this FAQ on anonymity). At the stage of submitting a short proposal it is important however that you explain what kind of difference you expect this project to make for the (anonymous) SME (in line with what the call text states). Which research competence will the SME bring? Which new knowledge (presumably from some of the partners in the consortium) will the SME absorb? How will this make a difference for the in-house research capacity of the SME, and for its long-term innovation potential and the vision of the company? Having said this, it is equally important to describe clearly and concisely the ideas you want to explore in this project.

Should I present the consortium and the expected budget in this short proposal or is this is not needed at this first stage evaluation?
Yes, we need a valid Part A, so you will need to come already now with some consortium of at least 3 partners from 3 countries (see the FP7 Rules for Participation for further details), of which one is an SME. The latter condition is specific for this objective. You also need to provide a budget. However, although we need this to formally start the evaluation, this information is not binding for the full proposal and you can change later on both the consortium and the budget (see the related questions under the section modifying a submitted proposal for further information).

The SME I have in mind is not in an EU or associated country, but has been carrying out research with many researchers in Europe. Is such an SME entitled to make a proposal , working in such a way with European academic partners?
As long as the consortium is eligible, such an SME is entitled to make a proposal and even to coordinate it. However, at the full proposal stage it will be important to make the case as to how such a consortium arrangement will improve European long-term competitiveness.

Which are the teams/means required to demonstrate the establishment and proven in-house research capacity of the high-tech research intensive SME?
There is unfortunately no black-and-white definition of the kind of SME we are looking for. Thus, the established and proven in-house research capacity is in itself a matter of appreciation during the evaluation. This call works in a two-step scheme, of which the first step is anonymous and we only require that the proposers state that one of the partners is indeed an SME, explaining also how it will benefit from a project like this (in the sense of a long term vision). Only at the second stage of evaluation, when you will be requested to submit a full proposal, we will request more information on the SME itself, and its high-tech research intensive nature. This information will include such things as a brief history of the SME, a description of its in-house research activities and achievements, a list of research staff with high qualification (e.g. PhD), and some information on R&D investment. But, again, this will only be important at the second stage, i.e., once you have passed the first step evaluation of the short proposal.

As a company with the status of Research and Development Centre, also engaged in consulting, can we take part in the high-tech research intensive SME scheme?
An SME is defined as for FP7 in general, according to the meaning of Commission Recommendation 2003/361/EC in the version of 6 May 2003. According to Article 2 of the Annex, an SME (Micro, Small or Medium-sized Enterprise) in an enterprise which:
has fewer than 250 employees,
has an annual turnover not exceeding 50 million EUR, and/or
has an annual balance-sheet total not exceeding 43 million EUR.
According to the new SME definition, possible relationships with other enterprises must be taken into account when calculating the data of such enterprises. Note also that research centres, research institutes, contract research organisations or consultancy firms are not considered eligible SMEs for the purpose of the co-operative and collective schemes.

Are proposers expected to mention the effort figures in the short proposal Part B?
No, proposers are not expected to mention effort figures in the Part B.

What information needs to be provided to show that the SME partner or partners are indeed SME of high-tech and research intensive nature?
At the short stage, we rely solely on the self declaration in Part A that the SME is indeed an SME. If the proposal reaches the full stage, the SME status will remain self-declared in Part A and the high-tech and research intensive nature will need to be explained more fully in Part B. The explanation will be based on whatever evidence the consortium deems relevant (for example, size of the research team, R&D spend as a percentage of turnover, research achievements, disciplines on board, qualifications of research staff, publications, etc). Such information contained in Part B will be evaluated at the full stage under the criteria 'implementation', while the impact of the project on strengthening and broadening the long-term in house research capacity of the participating SME(s) will be evaluated under the criteria 'impact'. Proposals which are retained for negotiation after successfully completing the full stage will be requested to provide necessary supporting evidence of the high-tech research intensive nature of the SME partner or partners.

How can I check that my project idea matches what FET-Open is looking for?
FET-Open maintains a description of its running projects on the Portfolio page. This is a good place to get a feeling for what FET-Open is looking for. It is also very important that proposers familiarise themselves with the call text in the FET Work Programme for 2011-2012 (the high-tech research intensive SME track call text is on page 5 and the criteria on 21-22). If after reading this, you still feel that the high-tech research intensive scheme is right for you and for your breakthrough idea, you are very welcome to test it with us before submitting. Further information on testing your idea can be seen on the dedicated FET-Open high-tech research intensive SME web pages in the FET-Open web site.

Specific questions relating to the Young Explorers call

Readers are asked to read also the full list of frequently asked questions in case of further doubts. If despite this, your question has not been answered please contact us.

Where can I find the information on the young explorers call?
Your first point of call should be our dedicated Young Explorers web pages on the FET-Open web site, which provide basic overview information. You can also consult the FET Work Programme for 2011-2012 (the young explorers track call text is on page 6 and the criteria on 21-22). Proposers are asked to read carefully the call text and the introduction to FET and FET-Open which contains important information. For example, please note that this call is only open to scientists and researchers for which no longer than 6 years has elapsed between award of a PhD and the date of submission of the short proposal. Further documents and guides relating to all FET-Open calls can be downloaded from the FET-Open call page . Note that a proposal template is included in the Guide for Applicants document which is available here. Keep in mind that the proposal needs to be written in light of the specific call text of objective ICT-2011.9.3. Submission is only through an on-line system called EPSS .

What about if I consider myself a young explorer but I completed my PhD more than 6 years ago? How strict are you on the age limit?
The coordinator and the work-package leader must have received their PhD degree no more that 6 years from the date of submission of the short proposal.
Extensions of this period may be allowed only in case of eligible career breaks which must be properly documented: maternity (18 months per child born after the PhD award) & paternity leave (accumulation of actual time off for children born after the PhD award) and leave taken for long-term illness, national service. No other extensions are possible and the age eligibility will be verified at the submission of the second stage.
However, FET-Open also operates the general open scheme which is open to any participants (including by the way young explorers if they so wish). If this applies to you, please visit the Challenging Current Thinking call page for further information.

If I am not a European citizen but I am working in an EU country, am I eligible to apply?
What matters is the country of the host institution, not your citizenship. The minimum requirements are that three host institutions from three different countries from the EU or associated countries participate.

Do I need to have a pre-settled position at a European/Affiliated State institution for the period of the grant at the submission time?
You should state your affiliation as it is at the moment of submission (for stage 1 and 2). If your proposal passes the evaluation, and is invited for negotiation, a justified change of host institution is acceptable. However, the new consortium must also meet the minimum requirements for collaborative EU projects, namely at least three partners from three institutions located in the EU or the associated countries.

How can I check that my project idea matches what FET-Open is looking for?
FET-Open maintains a description of its running projects on the Portfolio page. This is a good place to get a feeling for what FET-Open is looking for. It is also very important that proposers familiarise themselves with the call text in the FET Work Programme for 2011-2012 (the young explorers track call text is on page 6 and the criteria on 21-22). If you still feel that the young explorers scheme is right for you and for your breakthrough idea, you are very welcome to test it with us before submitting. Further information on testing your idea can be seen on the dedicated Young Explorers web pages on the FET-Open web site.

Do I have to have all partners identified at the first step?
Yes, and they must be named in the Part A of your proposal. This part will not be sent for review to the peer evaluators.

Can Ph.D. students also be part of the consortium?
Technically yes, but bear in mind that the scheme is designed to boost the careers of early-stage young researchers. At the second stage, the team of young researchers must argue that it is suitable to carry out this work. Depending on the precise nature of the work, a strong track-record may boost your chances in the competition.

How many grants do you expect to make in 2011-2012?
We have EUR 6 million reserved for 2011 and 2012. This is an indicative budget only, and may - under certain circumstances – be increased in the future.

Is there a template for the proposal?
Yes. You can get it from the electronic submission system EPSS .

Specific question relating to the International cooperation call

Where can I find the information on the International cooperation on FET research call?
Your first point of call should be our dedicated International Cooperation on FET research web pages in the FET-Open web site, which provide basic overview information. You can also consult the FET Work Programme for 2011-2012. Please note that this call designed to support ongoing FET projects with complementary research activities in which collaboration with non-EU research partners brings significant added value. It has a specific purpose. So you should carefully read the call text . Further documents and guides relating to all FET-Open calls can be downloaded from the FET-Open call page . Note that a proposal template is included in the Guide for Applicants document that can be downloaded from that call page with specific instructions for that call provided in Annex 6. Keep in mind that the proposal needs to be written in light of the specific call text of objective ICT-2011.9.4. Submission is only through an on-line system called EPSS .

Do I need to submit a short proposal for the objective ICT-2011.9.4 International cooperation on FET research?
No. This is a one step submission of 'full proposal'.

What is the definition of an ongoing FET project?
The ongoing project must be an IP or STREP previously granted under any of the FET objectives of the FP7 ICT Work Programmes. The ongoing FET project must still be going on for at least 18 months after the submission date of the extension proposal.

Do all the partners from the on-going FET project have to be involved in the proposal?
Not necessarily. Only the coordinator and the partners actively in the proposed complementary work or in its integration with the current project activities need to be involved. The proposal has to be submitted by the coordinator of the on-going project.

Can the extension proposal end after the ongoing FET project?
The call text targets an extension of scope of the ongoing FET project rather than an extension in duration but it does not exclude that this reasonably extends beyond the original duration of the ongoing project (e.g. up to 6 months?). If successful, the ongoing FET project will be amended to implement the extension of scope and will also be extended to match the new duration. This however does not alter the condition that the ongoing FET projects ends at least 18 months after the submission date of the proposal.

How will the extension be managed contractually vis a vis the ongoing FET project?
The extension will be implemented contractually as an amendment to the ongoing project and not as a separate grant.

Do we have to treat this as a new proposal in all senses?
The proposal will be evaluated as a new proposal, independently from the ongoing project by independent experts. The description of the extension proposal should be self-contained for the reader in that context. It should focus on the complementary research requested with some sufficient reference to the context and content of the ongoing project to be understandable by the evaluator. Note that a proposal template is included in the Guide for Applicants document that can be downloaded from the FET-Open call page with specific instructions provided in Annex 6.

Are there any budget recommendations?
There are no budget recommendations provided in the call text. One could expect that the budget would be primarily for the new non-EU research partner and for complementing the budget of the existing partners to implement the proposed complementary research and integrate it within the on-going project. Depending on the scope and the duration of the extension requested and on the number of partners involved, one would expect it to be typically in the order of a few 100k€.

Are there any additional eligibility criteria specific to this objective?
To be eligible, the proposal must be submitted by the coordinator of the ongoing FET project. The ongoing FET project must still be running for at least 18 months after the submission date of the proposal. These criteria are in addition to the usual eligibility criteria applicable to any proposal.

When will the evaluation results be communicated? When will the extension proposal start?
The batch cut-off dates are indicated the FET-Open call page and in Annex 1 of the Guide for Applicants. Evaluation results are expected to be available within 2 months from the related batch cut-off date. Successful extension proposals are expected to start some six months after the cut-off date.

Other documents, web resources and contacts

I have a technical question about the Electronic Proposal System Helpdesk (EPSS) system. Whom should I contact?
For any technical questions you may have please contact the EPSS Help Desk . When contacting the EPSS helpdesk, please provide the Call Identifier (FP7-ICT-2011-C) and the relevant instrument (STREP or CA etc).

I am looking for documents relating to the preparation and submission of proposals. Where can I find these?
Documents which are relevant for the preparation and submission of a proposal to the FET-Open scheme can be downloaded from the FET-Open Call Page .