Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Protecting Europe's Trade and State Secrets: New IT Security Guide says Avoid the Cloud, Stick to non-US Servers

Contributed by: SPACEPOL (EU)

A data privacy and anti-espionage guide which was recently released by SPACEPOL Academic Publishers is warning governments and corporations in Europe, Russia and Latin America about mass surveillance carried out by the so-called Five Eyes countries.
The guide, which was made available free of charge and online by the Canadian publishing house is also instructing government IT users how to plan their hosting and telecommunications services so as to avoid jurisdictions where their data could be leaked to spying governments or other corporations.

Gunnar's Basic Internet Security Guide was released in the beginning of 2015 by technology policy and national innovation policy expert Gunnar K. A. Njålsson who regularly consults governments and organizations on issues ranging from national innovation strategy to protection of state and trade secrets from surveillance activities and espionage.

"We're seeing alot of unethical behaviour by states, organizations and individuals on the present Internet. We're seeing alot of unpreparedness and technological adolescence on the part of states and organizations with valuable secrets" Njalsson told SPNW. In a dedicated chapter of the new guide Gunnar Njalsson warns government agencies not to "turn government transparency into online exhibitionism", thus aiding the efforts of US, UK, Australian and other spy agencies which scour the the Internet systematically and constantly.

According to the author, it is important for governments entrusted with the information of citizens and national enterprises to understand that allowing any foreign country to access sensitive personal and trade information is putting one's own nation, its security and its economy at risk.

But, Njalsson points out, it is not just about issues as exotic as industrial espionage or mass surveillance. "It is also a question of legal jurisdiction. You are carrying out your activities in that jurisdiction or those jurisdictions where the servers you work through are located. It doesn't matter where you are physically sitting and if something goes wrong, you will be dealt with in the jurisdiction where your data are or have been," Njålsson warns.

For this reason, Gunnar's Basic Internet Security Guide warns users with sensitive information not to put that information on the so-called cloud where servers are often located in jurisdictions known for their mass surveillance and attempts at foreign espionage. Such breaches would then be subject to the very jurisdiction and law of the surveilling state.

The newly-released IT security guide was provided free of charge in wake of the exposure received by massive United States and United Kingdom programmes which are being used to spy on ordinary citizens and businesses around the world. Concerns have arisen that these programmes could also be gathering state secrets and industrial or trade secrets from countries in Europe, Latin America and Eurasia. Gunnar Njalsson seeks to harden governments and corporations in Europe, Russia and Latin America against these risks.

Gunnar's Basic Internet Security Guide can be downloaded as a PDF file or read directly on the publisher's own website.

More on this news item:


Gunnar's Basic Internet Security Guide in PDF format:

Gunnar's Basic Internet Security Guide - Readable Online




Related information

Countries (17)

  • Argentina, Austria, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Germany, Estonia, Spain, France, Iran, Italy, New Zealand, Russia, Slovakia, Uruguay


surveillance, espionage, industrial espionage, technology, x400, security, NSA, cybersecurity, books, guides, data protection, technology alternatives, news
Record Number: 131237 / Last updated on: 2016-03-03
Category: Policy making and guidelines
Provider: WIRE
Revision: 0