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Europe in the right MODE for future internet� [Print to PDF] [Print to RTF]

We live in a fast-paced world, where information hits us from left and right. The transmission of data is made possible via diverse channels, including wireless communication, optical fibres and storage media. But as changes emerge, so do the needs in this field. The MODE-GAP ...
Europe in the right MODE for future internet�
We live in a fast-paced world, where information hits us from left and right. The transmission of data is made possible via diverse channels, including wireless communication, optical fibres and storage media. But as changes emerge, so do the needs in this field. The MODE-GAP ('Multi-mode capacity enhancement with PBG [photonic band gap] fibre') project is developing the next generation internet infrastructure to improve the capacity of broadband core networks, making bandwidth 100 times larger than the current capacity. MODE-GAP is funded under the 'Information and communication technologies' (ICT) Theme of the EU's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) to the tune of EUR 8.33 million.

Under the plan, MODE-GAP is working on transmission technologies based on specialist long-haul transmission fibres and associated enabling technologies. Some of these technologies include transmitter and receiver components, rare-earth doped optical amplifiers and data processing tools.

The four-year project will effectively enable 'future proof networks and systems of increasing information throughput', according to the project members. Failure to do so will significantly impact the future of the Internet, they say.

'We are close to realising the fundamental data carrying capacity limits of current fibre technology in the laboratory and although there is plenty of headroom for capacity scaling of commercial systems for the next 10 to 15 years, we need to be looking now at developing a new generation of transmission techniques, based on novel fibres and amplifiers, if we are to keep pace with society's ever increasing data transport demands in the longer term,' explains Professor David Richardson from the Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) at the University of Southampton, the MODE-GAP coordinator.

'The MODE-GAP project has the potential to revolutionise the way we build and operate future generations of optical network. Success will require substantial innovation and major technological developments in a number of fields. The consortium partners believe that they are ideally equipped to undertake the work and are looking forward to the many challenges ahead.'

The MODE-GAP consortium consists of academic and industry experts from Phoenix Photonics Ltd (UK), ESPCI ParisTech (France), the Brondy-based OFS Fitel Denmark APS, the COBRA Institute at Technische Universiteit Eindhoven (Netherlands), Eblana Photonics Ltd (Ireland), Nokia Siemens Networks GMBH & Co. KG (Germany), and the Tyndall National Institute of University College Cork (Ireland).

Commenting on the project, Bart Van Caenegem, Project Officer at the European Commission, said: 'A European consortium of highly qualified and talented researchers has teamed up and has adopted a groundbreaking approach in R&D [research and development] to advance the transmission technologies that will enable the networks of the future. This EU-funded project contributes to the Digital Agenda objectives, namely it aims to improve the competitiveness of the European industry and it aims to enable Europe to master and shape future developments in information communication technology (ICT) so that it can meet the demands of its society and economy.'

Ultimately, the Digital Agenda will deliver sustainable economic and social benefits from a digital single market based on accelerated interoperable applications.
Source: University of Southampton

Related information

Programmes

Countries (5)

  • Germany, Denmark, France, Ireland, Netherlands
Record Number: 32841 / Last updated on: 2010-12-07
Category: Project
Provider: EC