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Irish tweets reach space [Print to PDF] [Print to RTF]

Twitter is taking the world by storm, and Europeans are increasingly tapping away on their smart phones to get across their diverse messages - both in Europe and abroad. So why not use Twitter to promote and communicate to young people the benefits of EU funding in science, in...
Irish tweets reach space
Twitter is taking the world by storm, and Europeans are increasingly tapping away on their smart phones to get across their diverse messages - both in Europe and abroad. So why not use Twitter to promote and communicate to young people the benefits of EU funding in science, innovation and research?

The talktoeu programme is funded by the European Commission Representation in Ireland to engage and inform Irish citizens about the EU and what it can do for them. On 9 November, it launched its #TWEETSINSPACE experiment, which is part of the campaign to encourage future Irish scientists to obtain available EU funding and to celebrate Robert Boyle. This experiment was made up of three components: a balloon, Junior Certificate Physics, and tweets created by people in Ireland.

'The European Union needs a million more researchers by 2020 if we want to stay ahead of the game in research and tackle major issues like climate change and food shortages,' said European Commissioner for Research, Innovation and Science, Máire Geoghegan-Quinn. 'EU funding is supporting many young scientists to further their careers and really make a difference.'

#TWEETSINSPACE was also launched to celebrate Robert Boyle, one of Ireland's most renowned scientists. Boyle had a significant impact on the scientific world. This campaign could be the catalyst Ireland needs to bring another Boyle to the world of science.

For #TWEETSINSPACE, the team launched a weather balloon from Cahirciveen, County Kerry, to the edge of our planet's atmosphere. The objective was to take the balloon, which had Boyle's face imprinted on it, and demonstrate the expansion of gasses - as Boyle's Law predicts. A camera was used to film the balloon's expansion and then its explosion as the air pressure outside the balloon decreased.

The talktoeu team used the global positioning system (GPS) to locate the balloon payload following its burst. They also recovered the high-definition video footage showing the experiment in action.

Various tweets from the public were included in the experiment. Rising to the edge of space, these tweets were the highest ever sent in Ireland.

The European Commission last July announced the final and largest ever set of calls for proposals of research under its Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). More than EUR 8 billion has been earmarked to support projects and ideas that will increase Europe's competitiveness and address various issues, including human health, environmental protection, urbanisation and waste management.
Source: talktoeu; European Commission Representation in Ireland

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Record Number: 35256 / Last updated on: 2012-11-19
Category: Miscellaneous
Provider: EC