Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

CORDIS Express: Using but not abusing our marine resources [Print to PDF] [Print to RTF]

Europe's seas and oceans offer us so much: a source of fresh, nutritious food, a transport and trade route, a vast renewable energy resource and a world of underwater creatures and organisms ripe for research.

Our seas and oceans offer us a seemingly endless range of species ...
CORDIS Express: Using but not abusing our marine resources
Europe's seas and oceans offer us so much: a source of fresh, nutritious food, a transport and trade route, a vast renewable energy resource and a world of underwater creatures and organisms ripe for research.

Our seas and oceans offer us a seemingly endless range of species and organisms with healing, nutritional and otherwise unique properties that throw up fascinating uses in the lab. For example, researchers estimate that there may be as many as 594 232 novel compounds waiting to be discovered in unstudied marine species, and that these could lead to between 55 and 214 new anti-cancer drugs.

However, our marine environment is also feeling the effect of human activities as we continue to heap pressure on marine ecosystems. In fact, the European Environment Agency recently reported that less than 20 % of Europe's marine habitats and ecosystems are labelled as having a 'good status'.

Excellent, cross-cutting science and innovation projects have a role to play here. They can help us to achieve a thriving and sustainable maritime economy, and protect the environment from the negative costs of human interference.

Just as oceans ignore borders, marine research projects must often be cross-cutting and involve many disciplines. Marine and maritime research actions are taking place across the different thematic priorities and specific programmes of FP7. Take a look at the links below to read about some exciting ongoing and recently concluded research projects in this area:

- Coral reefs that may be resistant to climate change

- New ways of cultivating valuable marine microorganisms

- Europe's changing marine environment

- Marine environment research in Tunisia

- Easy data recovery from the seabed

- Observing objects in the ocean

- Hovercraft to clean ocean oil spills

- Deep-sea fish and their ecosystems

- The future of offshore platforms
Record Number: 36543 / Last updated on: 2014-05-02
Category: Miscellaneous
Provider: EC