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Abstract

This paper describes the potential use of large-scale penetrators for the measurement of the geotechnical, geophysical and geochemical properties of deep ocean sediments. Initial trials have demonstrated that a free fall penetrator weighing 1800 kg can achieve a burial depth in excess of 30 metres. Furthermore, an acoustic link can be maintained between the penetrator and the ship during penetration, so that data collected during penetration or subsequently can be relayed to the ship acoustically. A sizeable instrumentation package could be mounted on board, converting the penetrator into an in situ experiment.

Additional information

Authors: FREEMAN T J BLDG.RES.ESTAB., GARSTON, WATFORD (UK) CARLYLE S G DEPT.OF THE ENVIRONMENT, LONDON (UK) FRANCIS T J G INST. OF OCEANOGRAPHIC SCI. (UK) MURRAY C N JRC ISPRA ESTAB. (ITALY) , BLDG.RES.ESTAB., GARSTON, WATFORD (UK);DEPT.OF THE ENVIRONMENT, LONDON (UK);INST. OF OCEANOGRAPHIC SCI. (UK);JRC ISPRA ESTAB. (ITALY)
Bibliographic Reference: OCEANOLOGY INTERNATIONAL 1984 CONFERENCE, BRIGHTON (UK), MARCH 6-9, 1984 WRITE TO CEC LUXEMBOURG, DG XIII/A2, POB 1907 MENTIONING PAPER E 31400 ORA
Availability: Can be ordered online
Record Number: 1989122056200 / Last updated on: 1987-01-01
Category: PUBLICATION
Available languages: en