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Abstract

The paper summarizes knowledge from observations on the survivors of the atomic bomb explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The three main types of radiation effects that are particularly relevant to considerations of the risks of small doses of ionizing radiations are considered separately, i.e. hereditary effects, prenatal effects, and radiation carcinogenesis. The T-65 dosimetry that had been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the revised LLNL-81 dosimetry developed in Livermore are compared and the essential conclusions are examined that follow from the revision of the dosimetry. The question is addressed whether the substantial reduction of neutron doses in Hiroshima requires the assumption of higher risk factors for X-ray. It is concluded that no substantial changes in the risk factors are required because the increase of the gamma ray dose in the new dosimetry largely balances the contribution of the neutrons invoked earlier. In a second part of the paper coordinate plots of the old dosimetry and of the new dosimetry are utilized to show - with reference to new observations on high neutron RBEs obtained in animal experiments - that neutrons can, at present, not be assumed to be insignificant in Hiroshima. In fact, they may, according to the present status of the new dosimetry, be equally important to the gamma rays in the low dose range.

Additional information

Authors: KELLERER A M INSTITUT FUER MEDIZINISCHE STRAHLENKUNDE DER UNIVERSITAET WUERZBURG (GERMANY), INSTITUT FUER MEDIZINISCHE STRAHLENKUNDE DER UNIVERSITAET WUERZBURG (GERMANY)
Bibliographic Reference: DEUTSCHE UND OESTERREICHISCHE STRAHLENSCHUTZTAGUNG, REINBECK BEI HAMBURG (GERMANY), MAY 27-28, 1983 WRITE TO CEC LUXEMBOURG, DG XIII/A2, POB 1907 MENTIONING PAPER D31354 ORA
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Record Number: 1989122080700 / Last updated on: 1987-01-01
Category: PUBLICATION
Available languages: de