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Abstract

The most attractive characteristics of the dye lasers in view of their application to analytical atomic fluorescence spectroscopy were certainly the tunability and the available power within the spectral absorption bandwidth. This source was therefore considered to be the ideal (although costly) replacement of conventional excitation lamps for fluorescence work in flames and graphite atomizers. The attainment of optical saturation of the fluorescence signal resulted in a number of peculiar theoretical advantages of the technique such as: (i) independence of the fluorescence signal upon the fluctuations of the laser source; (ii) independence of the fluorescence signal upon the quenching characteristics of the atomizer; (iii) improvement in the linear dynamic range of the analytical calibration curves because of the absence of self-absorption; and (iv) possibility of deriving, for a two-level atomic system, directly the total number density in the atomizer. The present discussion is applicable to combustion systems at atmospheric pressure such as all analytically useful hydrogen- and acetylene fuelled flames and to various types of plasmas such as the inductively coupled argon plasma or the microwave plasma. Among the parameters of interest to analytical chemists as well as to combustion engineers, we restrict our discussion to three of them, namely the temperature, the number density and the quantum efficiency.

Additional information

Authors: OMENETTO N JRC ISPRA ESTAB. (ITALY), JRC ISPRA ESTAB. (ITALY)
Bibliographic Reference: ANALYTICAL LASER SPECTROSCOPY, ERICE (ITALY), SEPT. 25-OCT.8, 1982. SEE PROCEEDINGS PUBLISHED BY PLENUM PUBLISHING CORPORATION, NEW YORK (USA) 1985, PP. 131-146. WRITE TO CEC LUXEMBOURG, DG XIII/A2, MENTIONING PAPER E 30734 ORA.
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Record Number: 1989123074400 / Last updated on: 1987-01-01
Category: PUBLICATION
Available languages: en