Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Abstract

The chloroplast hydrogenase system consists of isolated biological components and is inherently unstable and the question arises as to whether the components can be stabilized in order to function continuously in the light for months and possibly years. This project investigates the characteristics of the in vitro system containing light harvesting biological membranes from plants or algae, electron mediators, and hydrogenase (or platinum) which on illumination liberates hydrogen gas, so that a biochemical reactor for production of hydrogen, with water as the proton and electron source and sunlight as energy source, could ultimately be constructed for solar energy conversion and storage. A detailed study of the stabilization of the catalysts showed that the "bioreactor" could be operated continuously. This report summarizes efforts to stabilize the three main components of the system, viz., chloroplasts, electron carrier catalysts, and the proton activator. It also discusses alternative approaches adopted for photobiological H-2 production such as the use of whole cells of cyanobacteria embedded in polyurethane foam pieces as photocatalysts and the use of hydrogenases immobilized onto semiconductor particles for photoproduction of hydrogen. The energy conversion efficiency of some of the H-2 evolution reactions were determined and are reported.

Additional information

Authors: RAO K K, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON (UK);HALL D O UNIVERSITY OF LONDON (UK), UNIVERSITY OF LONDON (UK)
Bibliographic Reference: EUR 9275 EN (1984) MF, 41 P., BFR 120, BLOW-UP COPY BFR 205, EUROFFICE, LUXEMBOURG, POB 1003
Availability: Can be ordered online
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