Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Abstract

Europe's Common Agricultural Policy has encouraged agricultural biotechnology to such an extent that large surpluses of many foods have emerged. Thus land must now be progressively withdrawn from food production and used in some other way. Obvious opportunities exist to provide inputs to various industries (chemicals, pharmaceuticals, forest products ...) and since industry also provides inputs to agriculture interrelationships between the two will intensify. Advances in biotechnology will lead to the design, growth and processing of crops under unified control, irrespective of end use (food, feed, chemicals ...), and to optimisation of the overall system. Similar changes are taking place in the US and the Far East so Europe must compete, or risk having productive land fall idle. The Commission's Biotechnology Action Programme (1985 - 1989) should improve the context for such competition through European programmes of research and training and by coordination of policies, especially on "feedstock" prices, regulations and patents.

Additional information

Authors: SARGEANT K CEC BRUXELLES (BELGIUM), CEC BRUXELLES (BELGIUM)
Bibliographic Reference: BIOTECHNOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATION TO AGRICULTURE + 1, CAMBRIDGE (UK), SEPT. 4, 1985 WRITE TO CEC LUXEMBOURG, DG XIII/A2, POB 1907 MENTIONING PAPER E 32324 ORA
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