Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Abstract

Natural vegetation could be used as a renewable source of energy where it is particularly extensive or productive. Experiments have been established to investigate the effects of weather, time of harvesting, frequency of harvesting and addition of fertilizers on the yields of natural vegetation. If methanol could be produced from Pteridium yielding 8 t ha**-1yr**-1 with an efficiency of 50%, the equivalent of the energy in 25% of all the petrol and petroleum product deliveries in Scotland would be contained in Scotland's Pteridium resource. Farms in northern Britain could be self sufficient for energy by using natural biofuels and could market surplus requirements to generate a new source of income. Further research is required to develop optimum crop management practices and to demonstrate and cost the suitable agricultural and conversion equipment required to produce biofuels. The scheme developed to obtain solid biofuels from autumn biomass can be applied to many perennial species which naturally cover large areas of the EEC.

Additional information

Authors: CALLAGHAN T V, NATURAL ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH COUNCIL, SWINDON (UK);SCOTT R, NATURAL ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH COUNCIL, SWINDON (UK);LAWSON G J, NATURAL ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH COUNCIL, SWINDON (UK);MAINWARING A M NATURAL ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH COUNCIL, SWINDON (UK), NATURAL ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH COUNCIL, SWINDON (UK)
Bibliographic Reference: EUR 10013 EN (1985) MF, 254 P., BFR 450, BLOW-UP COPY BFR 1270, EUROFFICE, LUXEMBOURG, POB 1003
Availability: Can be ordered online
Record Number: 1989124062000 / Last updated on: 1987-01-01
Category: PUBLICATION
Available languages: en