Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Abstract

The method of generating intense Planck radiation by a laboratory source is shown. An external source delivers energy into a mmsize cavity enclosed by a solid wall. With a laser source one, or preferably several small holes in the wall are required for transmitting the beam whereas a particle beam can penetrate a wall that is then yet still thick enough to contain the thermal radiation in the cavity. The rapid deposition of energy in the cavity is supposed to heat the inner wall to a high temperature and to generate intense Planck radiation in equilibrium with the wall. For the applications envisaged, it is important that at these elevated temperatures the radiative exchange of energy between different wall elements is so effective, that very uniform conditions are established in the cavity even if the initial wall irradiation by the source is not uniform. Furthermore, because photons propagate with the speed of light, the radiation field may be formed in the empty cavity before it fills with evaporated, hot plasma from the wall. Crucial to the success of this concept is the confinement of the radiation by the cavity.

Additional information

Authors: SIGEL R MAX-PLANCK-INSTITUT FUER QUANTENOPTIK, GARCHING (GERMANY), MAX-PLANCK-INSTITUT FUER QUANTENOPTIK, GARCHING (GERMANY)
Bibliographic Reference: EUROPHYSICS NEWS, VOL. 17 (1986), NO. 9, PP. 116-120
Record Number: 1989126009900 / Last updated on: 1988-02-01
Category: PUBLICATION
Available languages: en