Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Abstract

The print media coverage of the Chernobyl accident was analysed in seven European countries. The goal was to identify common communications problems and to suggest how they might be resolved. Aside from difficulties with technical information on units of radiation exposure, contamination, and effects, the media did a reasonably good job of presenting to the public the information they were given by official sources. Some evidence of confusion was found, and it affected the credibility of communications, but the press seemed to be reflecting confusion existing within crisis management teams and the scientific community rather than creating it. Some of the more common problems are discussed and ideas for improving crisis management and the communication of information about risks are explored.

Additional information

Authors: OTWAY H, JRC-ISPRA;CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY, LONDON (UK);HAASTRUP P, JRC-ISPRA;CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY, LONDON (UK);GIANITSOPOULOS G, JRC-ISPRA;CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY, LONDON (UK);PARUCCINI M, JRC-ISPRA;CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY, LONDON (UK);CANNELL W JRC-ISPRA, JRC-ISPRA;CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY, LONDON (UK);CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY, LONDON (UK), JRC-ISPRA;CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY, LONDON (UK)
Bibliographic Reference: EUR 11043 EN (1987) FS, 76 P., BFR 300, EUROFFICE, LUXEMBOURG, POB 1003
Availability: Can be ordered online
Record Number: 1989126013600 / Last updated on: 1989-03-01
Category: PUBLICATION
Available languages: en
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