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Abstract

Salix is one of the faster growing tree species that has potential for biomass plantations in Europe. This potential, however, is limited by the occurrence of a vascular disease caused by the bacterium Erwinia salicis (Day) Chester. Selection and breeding for disease resistance are hampered by insufficient knowledge of the infection biology and ecology of the pathogen. The availability of specific antisera is of vital importance in the study of the infection biology and in monitoring bacterial populations inside the host. To test the specificity of antisera, the epiphytic and endophytic bacterial floras of Salix alba were isolated and tested for the occurrence of antigens which cross-reacted with antiserum that was produced against E. salicis cells. An inoculation experiment was carried out to ascertain whether a statistically significant correlation between plant water potential and response to artificial inoculation with E. salicis existed. It was discovered that in Salix alba, as in other woody species, plant water potential changes with the evaporative demand of the air and the availability of water in the soil. It was also observed that trees inoculated when plant water potential was low showed a higher response to artificial inoculation with E. salicis than trees inoculated when plant water potential was high.

Additional information

Authors: DINGJAN-VERSTEEGH A M, Institute for Forestry and Urban Ecology, Wageningen (NL);DE KAM M, Institute for Forestry and Urban Ecology, Wageningen (NL)
Bibliographic Reference: EUR 12633 EN (1990) 45 pp., MF, ECU 4, blow-up copy ECU 6.25
Availability: (2)
Record Number: 199010458 / Last updated on: 1994-12-01
Category: PUBLICATION
Original language: en
Available languages: en