Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Abstract

Even a 1/10,000 mm layer of boron or a boron/carbon mixture on the inner walls of fusion reactors prevents erosion of the wall and enables plasmas of hitherto unattained purity to be produced. From the early 1980s, walls were treated with amorphous carbon, containing hydrogen. This suppressed the release of metal into the plasma, but contamination of the plasma with carbon and oxygen remained a problem, the released oxygen itself causing further erosion of the carbon. When boron is introduced into the coating, it binds the oxygen. A further advantage is that material carried away tends to be deposited back onto the coating, making it highly durable. The article discusses: - the method used to deposit the coating from a gas mixture; - the properties of the coating, in particular the chemical bonding of the boron and carbon atoms; - the operational advantages and disadvantages of the boronised coatings, used in TEXTOR, as compared to beryllium, used as a wall coating or wall material in JET; - potential applications of these extremely hard and corrosion-resisting coatings in other technical fields.

Additional information

Authors: WINTER J, Kernforschungsanlage Jülich GmbH, Institut für Plasmaphysik, Jülich (DE);ESSER H G, Kernforschungsanlage Jülich GmbH, Institut für Plasmaphysik, Jülich (DE);REIMER H, Kernforschungsanlage Jülich GmbH, Institut für Plasmaphysik, Jülich (DE);WIENHOLD P, Kernforschungsanlage Jülich GmbH, Institut für Plasmaphysik, Jülich (DE)
Bibliographic Reference: Article: Sonderdruck Jahresbericht 1991 der KFA Jülich (1991) pp. 3-11
Record Number: 199210854 / Last updated on: 1994-12-02
Category: PUBLICATION
Original language: de
Available languages: de