Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the possibility of using laboratory petrographic studies and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) reactivities in predicting industrial combustion behaviour expressed by entrained flow reactor (EFR) experiments. These come close to the conditions of power generation combustion and provide burn-off measurements giving kinetic evaluation of the reaction rate. The results suggest that in assessing a coal for pulverised fuel combustion, three factors should be considered: - rank for similar petrographic composition, - petrographic composition at the same rank, - weathering. If petrographic composition is similar, rank is important because reactivity decreases as rank increases, particularly for values of %R(0) below unity; through the bituminous range the decrease is inversely proportional to %R(0). On the other hand, at the same rank coals composed principally of vitrinite macerals can have a reactivity 50% greater than those which are mainly inertinite. This variation amounts to half of the change attributable to rank throughout the bituminous range. Also, weathering can increase the reactivity of bituminous coals by up to 25% over periods of a year. The use of an oxidation quotient may aid in assessing the extent of weathering.

Additional information

Authors: SKORUPSKA N M, The University, Northern Carbon Research Laboratories, Newcastle upon Tyne (GB);BEND S L, The University, Northern Carbon Research Laboratories, Newcastle upon Tyne (GB);HALEY E, The University, Northern Carbon Research Laboratories, Newcastle upon Tyne (GB);MARSH H, The University, Northern Carbon Research Laboratories, Newcastle upon Tyne (GB);EDWARDS I A S, The University, Northern Carbon Research Laboratories, Newcastle upon Tyne (GB)
Bibliographic Reference: EUR 14193 EN (1992) 161 pp., MF, ECU 8, blow-up copy ECU 25.50
Availability: (2)
Record Number: 199211142 / Last updated on: 1994-11-29
Category: PUBLICATION
Original language: en
Available languages: en
Follow us on: RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube Managed by the EU Publications Office Top