Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Abstract

ITER is a type of fusion reactor based on the technology of the Tokamak reactor. The Tokamak comprises of a chamber surrounded by a magnetic confinement ring which will contain the plasma inside throughout the reaction cycle. The plasma inside the chamber is charged and has an induced electric current running through it to ultimately cause a fusion reaction when it reaches the critical temperature. ITER experiments are much larger than Tokamak therefore considerable amounts of information are required in order to effectively scale-up the procedure. This information comes from a database gathered from experiments run using Tokamak reactors to study the behaviour of the many different types of Tokamak in operation. The data used from this database has undergone a thorough statistical evaluation producing results with accompanying error bars. The prediction of the amount of time the thermal energy produced by the plasma can be contained for ITER experiments is based on scaling up of power law. The range of variables determined from the main parameters are studied individually to provide a comprehensive overview of reactor design. This information will aid in determining which of the factors will be most influenced by the scale up procedure and which variable will provide the most stable environment for ITER to operate.

Additional information

Authors: SAUTER O, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-ConfÚdÚration Suisse, cole Polytechnique FÚdÚrale de Lausanne (CH);MARTIN Y, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-ConfÚdÚration Suisse, cole Polytechnique FÚdÚrale de Lausanne (CH)
Bibliographic Reference: Article: Nuclear Fusion, Vol. 40 (2000) No. 5, pp. 955-964
Availability: Nuclear Fusion (Journal)
Follow us on: RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube Managed by the EU Publications Office Top