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Abstract

Global warming is a key issue in todays environment therefore it is important to understand all the processes that affect the atmospheric system. Sulphur compounds are prevalent in the atmosphere in many forms, especially dimethylsulphoxide - DMSO- and dimethylsulphone. 10-30% of this sulphur is released from phytoplankton in marine systems around the world. Experiments were carried out in closed containers using FTIR spectroscopy. The two species named above were reacted with several important greenhouse gases such as hydroxide and nitrate radicals, chlorine atoms and ozone. The results of these interactions are placed in a database and models of atmosphere/ocean interactions produced. It is thought that dimethylsulphide species from the oceans may provide tropospheric aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei which may contribute to global warming through negative feedback. DMSO reacts with the gaseous species to form other compounds in the atmosphere. Particularly important is the reaction with hydroxide radicals which produces sulphur dioxide often seen in acid rain.

Additional information

Authors: FALBE-HANSEN H, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Environment Institute, Ispra (IT);SÏRENSEN S, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Environment Institute, Ispra (IT);JENSEN NR, Odense University, Department of Chemistry, Odense (DK);PEDERSEN T, Copenhagen University, Department of Chemistry, Copenhagen East (DK);HJORTH J, Copenhagen University, Department of Chemistry, Copenhagen East (DK)
Bibliographic Reference: Article: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 34 (2000) pp. 1543-1551
Availability: Atmospheric Environment (Journal)
Record Number: 200012130 / Last updated on: 2000-07-21
Category: PUBLICATION
Original language: en
Available languages: en