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Development and Validation of Methods for Customs Analysis - A review of methods which may be used to detect the presence of common wheat (triticum aestivum) in durum wheat (triticum durum) pasta products

Funded under: FP5-GROWTH

Abstract

Pasta has traditionally been produced from durum wheat (triticum durum) because it produces a better quality product than common wheat (triticum aestivum). If significant amounts of common wheat are present in pasta, adhesion of gluten proteins to starch granules is hindered which leads to loss of starch on cooking and results in pasta with a "sticky" surface. Common wheat as traded is cheaper than durum wheat; this price differential (currently approximately 110 EURO per tonne) may provide some suppliers of raw material and manufacturers with an incentive to fraudulently benefit by the undeclared addition of common wheat as supposed to 100% durum wheat pastas. In 1994, the EU production cost of pasta was 4.6 billion EURO, with an export value of 403 million EURO, and a production volume of 6.9 million tonnes. Italy produces over 70% of European pasta. Pasta is an important food in Europe. Italy has the highest per capita consumption (28 Kg per year), followed by Greece (8.9 Kg), Portugal (7 Kg), France (6.8 Kg), UK (4.8 Kg), Germany (4.5 Kg) and Spain (4.3 Kg).

from the above it is clear that there is a need for analytical methods which can detect and determine the amount of common wheat in durum wheat pasta products, taking account of the 3%(m/m) allowed for adventitious contamination. Quantitation however poses a number of poses a number of problems because of the natural variation in the target analyte between varieties of common wheat and also because of the influences of pasta manufacture, e.g. heating, which may cause renaturation of the target analyte. .

Additional information

Authors: LUMLEY I D, Laboratory of the Government Chemist, Queens Road, Teddington (GB)
Bibliographic Reference: EUR 19371 EN (2000) 58 pp.
Availability: Available free of charge from Documentation Service DG Research
Record Number: 200012240 / Last updated on: 2000-07-31
Category: PUBLICATION
Original language: en
Available languages: en