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Abstract

An international round robin test on the analysis of carbonaceous aerosols on quartz fiber filters sampled at an urban site was organized by the Vienna University of Technology. Seventeen laboratories participated using nine different thermal and optical methods. For the analysis of total carbon (TC), a good agreement of the values obtained by all laboratories was found (7 and 9% r.s.d.). In contrast the results of the determination of elemental carbon (EC) in two not pre-extracted samples were highly variable ranging over more than one order of magnitude and the relative standard deviations (r.s.d.) of the means were 36.6 and 45.5%. The 10 laboratories that obtained similar results by using methods which reduce the charring artifact were put together to a new data set in order to approach a "real EC" value. This set showed 16 and 24% lower averages and r.s.d. of 14 and 24% for the two not pre-extracted samples. Taking the current filters as "equivalents" for urban aerosol samples we conclude that the following methods can be used for the analysis of EC in carbonaceous aerosols: thermal methods with an optical feature to correct for charring during pyrolysis, two-step thermal procedures reducing charring during pyrolysis, the VDI 2465/1 method (removal of OC by solvent extraction and thermodesorption in nitrogen) and the VDI 2465/2 method (combustion of OC and EC at different temperatures) with an additional pre-extraction with a dimethyl formamide (DMF)/toluene mixture.

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Additional information

Authors: SCHMID H, Institute for Analytical Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology (AT);PUXBAUM H, Institute for Analytical Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology (AT);LASKUS L, Umweltbundesamt, Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, Berlin (DE);ABRAHAM H J, Ministry of Urban Development, Berlin (DE);BALTENSPURGER U, Laboratory for Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry of the University of Bern and the Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen and Bern (CH);LAVANCHY V, Laboratory for Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry of the University of Bern and the Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen and Bern (CH);BIZJAK M, National Institute of Chemistry, Ljubljana (SI);BURBA P, Institut für Spektrochemie und angewandte Spektroskopie, Dortmund (DE);CACHIER H, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environment, Gif sur Yvette (FR);CROW D, Desert Research Institute, Reno, (US);CHOW J, Desert Research Institute, Reno, (US);GNAUK T, Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig (DE);EVEN A, ECN - Energy Research Foundation, Petten (NL);TEN BRINK H M, ECN - Energy Research Foundation, Petten (NL);GIESEN K-P, Niedersächsisches Landesamt für Ökologie, Hannover (DE);HITZENBERGER R, Institut für Experimentalphysik, Vienna (AT);HUEGLIN C, Abt. Luftfremdstoffe/Umwelttechnik, EMPA, Dübendorf (CH);MAENHAUT W, Institute for Nuclear Sciences, University of Gent (BE);PIO C, Department of Environment and Planning, University of Aveiro (PT);CARVALHO A, Department of Environment and Planning, University of Aveiro (PT);PUTAUD J-P, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Environment Institute, Atmospheric Process Unit, Ispra (IT);TOOM-SAUNTRY D, Remote Regions Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratory, Environment Canada, Downsview (CA)
Bibliographic Reference: An article published in: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 35 (12) (2001) pp. 2111-2121
Record Number: 200214701 / Last updated on: 2002-05-15
Category: PUBLICATION
Original language: en
Available languages: en