Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Abstract

Two significant problems that need to be solved for any future fusion device are heat removal and particle control. A very promising method to attack these problems in tokamaks and helical devices is the use of a divertor, providing a controlled interaction zone between plasma and wall. By carefully designing a divertor, conditions can be created in front of the divertor targets, which lead to a sufficient reduction of the power load on the targets by strong radiation redistribution. Any solution of course needs to allow for an energy confinement that is at least sufficient for the realization of a fusion reactor.

Two different types of divertors are presently being investigated in helical devices: the 'helical divertor' and the 'island divertor'. So far divertor concepts have been investigated only in a few helical devices. Theoretical and experimental efforts have mainly concentrated on the suitability of divertor magnetic field structures, while detailed studies of the divertor plasma properties for the two types of divertor configurations have only recently begun. In the course of this exploration, a promising new high-density H-mode (HDH) plasma operational regime has been discovered on the Wendelstein stellarator W7-AS. It benefits from high-energy (up to twice the value of the International Stellarator Scaling ISS95) and low impurity confinement times, complemented by edge radiated power fractions of up to 90% in detached regimes. This allowed quasi-steady-state operation for up to 50 energy confinement times and so far was only constrained by machine operability.

Additional information

Authors: KÖNIG R, 1 Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Teilinstitut Greifswald, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (DE);RENNER H, 1 Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Teilinstitut Greifswald, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (DE);WAGNER F, 1 Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Teilinstitut Greifswald, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (DE);GRIGULL P, Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching, EURATOM Association, Garching (DE);McCORMICK K, Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching, EURATOM Association, Garching (DE);FENG Y, Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching, EURATOM Association, Garching (DE);KISSLINGER J, Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching, EURATOM Association, Garching (DE);SARDEI F, Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching, EURATOM Association, Garching (DE);WERNER A, Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching, EURATOM Association, Garching (DE);KOMORI A, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu-ken (JP);MASUZAKI S, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu-ken (JP);MATSUOKA K, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu-ken (JP);OHYABU N, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu-ken (JP);OBIKI T, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gakasho, Uji, (JP)
Bibliographic Reference: An article published in: Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, 44 (November 2002) pp.2365-2422
Availability: This article can be accessed online by subscribers, and can be ordered online by non-subscribers, at: http://stacks.iop.org/0741-3335/44/2365
Follow us on: RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube Managed by the EU Publications Office Top