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Abstract

Computational models for the simulation of air quality are important tools for regulatory, policy and environmental research communities. Between 1980 and 1982 the European Commission adopted five ambient air quality directives. The Framework Directive on ambient air quality and management, adopted in 1996, and the corresponding daughter directives will strengthen these. They will set specific limit values with target dates in 2005 and 2010 for achieving the standards. Air quality models are used to develop and investigate emission control strategies to achieve these objectives.

Up to now, computational air quality models and European air quality directives typically addressed individual pollutants separately. However, pollutants in the atmosphere are subject to thousands of transformation pathways and transport processes that control their concentration and composition, and it is becoming increasingly evident that when pollutant issues are treated separately, the resulting control strategies may solve one set of problems but may lead to unexpected aggravation of other related pollutant issues.

Additional information

Authors: CUVELIER C, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra (IT);GALMARINI S, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra (IT);GRAZIANI G, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra (IT);THUNIS P, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra (IT)
Bibliographic Reference: An article published in: Pollution Atmosphérique - numéro special - MaI 2002, pp.51-68
Availability: Homepage of journal publisher: http://www.appa.asso.fr/
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