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FP7

Simulation of the hybrid and steady state advanced operating modes in ITER

Funded under: FP7-EURATOM

Abstract

Integrated simulations are performed to establish a physics basis, in conjunction with present tokamak experiments, for the operating modes in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Simulations of the hybrid mode are done using both fixed and free-boundary 1.5D transport evolution codes including CRONOS, ONETWO, TSC/TRANSP, TOPICS and ASTRA. The hybrid operating mode is simulated using the GLF23 and CDBM05 energy transport models. The injected powers are limited to the negative ion neutral beam, ion cyclotron and electron cyclotron heating systems. Several plasma parameters and source parameters are specified for the hybrid cases to provide a comparison of 1.5D core transport modelling assumptions, source physics modelling assumptions, as well as numerous peripheral physics modelling. Initial results indicate that very strict guidelines will need to be imposed on the application of GLF23, for example, to make useful comparisons. Some of the variations among the simulations are due to source models which vary widely among the codes used. In addition, there are a number of peripheral physics models that should be examined, some of which include fusion power production, bootstrap current, treatment of fast particles and treatment of impurities. The hybrid simulations project to fusion gains of 5.6-8.3, beta(N) values of 2.1-2.6 and fusion powers ranging from 350 to 500 MW, under the assumptions outlined in section 3. Simulations of the steady state operating mode are done with the same 1.5D transport evolution codes cited above, except the ASTRA code. In these cases the energy transport model is more difficult to prescribe, so that energy confinement models will range from theory based to empirically based. The injected powers include the same sources as used for the hybrid with the possible addition of lower hybrid.

Additional information

Authors: KESSEL C E, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (US);BUDNY R V, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (US);GIRUZZI G, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (US);ARTAUD J F, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (US);BASIUK V, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (US);IMBEAUX F, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (US);JOFFRIN E, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (US);SCHNEIDER M, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (US);SIPS A C C, Département de Recherches sur la Fusion Contrôlée, Association Euratom-CEA sur la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (FR);MURAKAMI M, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (DE);LUCE T, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (US);ST JOHN H, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (US);OIKAWA T, General Atomics, San Diego (US);HAYASHI N, ITER International Team, ITER Naka Joint Work Site, Naka (JP);TAKIZUKA T, ITER International Team, ITER Naka Joint Work Site, Naka (JP);OZEKI T, ITER International Team, ITER Naka Joint Work Site, Naka (JP);NA Y-S, ITER International Team, ITER Naka Joint Work Site, Naka (JP);PARK J M, ITER International Team, ITER Naka Joint Work Site, Naka (JP);GARCIA J, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (JP);TUCILLO A A, National Fusion Research Center, Yusung-Gu (KR)
Bibliographic Reference: An article published in: Nuclear Fusion 47 (2007), pp. 1274-1284
Availability: This article can be accessed online by subscribers, and can be ordered online by non-subscribers, at: http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1088/0029-5515/47/9/026
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