Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

FP7

Measuring civic competence in Europe - A composite indicator based on IEA civic education study 1999 for 14 years old in school

Funded under: FP7-JRC

Abstract

Measuring Civic Competence in Europe is part of a process to establish and monitor the learning outcomes needed to facilitate the development of active citizens in Europe. This report is an exploration of how civic competence can be measured and the results of these measurements across Europe and internationally. It describes what civic competence is in terms of the attitudes, values, knowledge and skills required and how it can be calculated using existing data from international tests. The data and scales used are from the IEA 1999 international Civic Education study of 14-year-olds in school. It clearly highlights the limitations of the data coverage for civic competence and explains which aspects of civic competence are not available and the implication for measuring civic competence. Following this the Civic Competence Composite Indicator is built using a framework comprised of 4 dimensions; Citizenship values, Social justice (both values and attitudes), Participatory attitudes and Cognitions about democratic institutions. Statistically the composite indicator was proved to be robust. The results of the CCCI ranking do not show clear geographical patterns and where patterns do occur these do not follow typical European scoreboard results. There is some tendency for Southern-European countries to be in the upper part of the ranking with Cyprus and Greece doing particularly well in the overall CCCI. For the four dimensions the results across Europe show that in countries with long standing stable democracies, where there are high levels of adult participation, young people's attitudes towards participation and Citizenship values are low. The opposite is true for less stable and more recent democracies that can be found in south and east Europe: in these countries young people have greater Participatory attitudes and values. North and West Europe fared better in the results for cognition about democratic institutions and the values of Social justice.

Additional information

Authors: HOSKINS B, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen, Ispra (IT);VILLALBA E, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen, Ispra (IT);VAN NIJLEN D, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen, Ispra (IT);BARBER C, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen, Ispra (IT)
Bibliographic Reference: EUR 23210 EN (2008), 132 pp. Free of charge
Availability: http://bookshop.europa.eu/is-bin/INTERSHOP.enfinity/WFS/EU-Bookshop-Site/en_GB/-/EUR/ViewPublication-Start?PublicationKey=LBNA23210 (Catalogue Number: LB-NA-23210-EN-C)
ISBN: ISBN: 978-92-79-08344-0
Record Number: 200910065 / Last updated on: 2008-11-20
Category: PUBLICATION
Original language: en
Available languages: en