Servizio Comunitario di Informazione in materia di Ricerca e Sviluppo - CORDIS

FP7

NET - HERITAGE Sintesi della relazione

Project ID: 219301
Finanziato nell'ambito di: FP7-ENVIRONMENT
Paese: Italy

Final Report Summary - NET - HERITAGE (European network on Research Programme applied to the Protection of Tangible Cultural Heritage)

Executive Summary:
The protection of cultural heritage under global change conditions will be a major concern for decision makers and researchers in Europe.
It will be viewed as a measure of the enduring civilization of Europe as well as sustained recognition of its worldwide leadership in this research area.
However, coordination is required to overcome the fragmentation of initiatives deriving from diverse and sometimes potentially conflicting approaches (research - administration - management - exploitation), the multiplicity and geographical dispersion of bodies and institutions involved with or in charge of cultural heritage, and the different local environmental, social and economic conditions.
To give only two examples, researchers are employed in different types of institutions including universities, research institutions, museums, galleries, and other heritage organisations across Europe. Except for the occasional conference, researchers are separated by the institutions that employ them.
The literatures of heritage science are invisible to non-researchers potentially interested in them.
Literatures can be made more directly "visible" to professional non-researchers either by unrestricted access to and searchability of the primary literature immediately against payment, or through open access to authors' written works after a short period of time, or, again, by creating a heritage community portal as was done in the NET HERITAGE project!
NET HERITAGE (European network on Research Programme applied to the Protection of Tangible Cultural Heritage) was the first significant initiative ever attempting to coordinate national RTD programmes of European countries and support the European RTD Programmes in the field of research applied to the Protection for Tangible Cultural Heritage, which is vital for the creation of a real European Research Area in a sector recognised for its worldwide leadership.
NET HERITAGE, through the partnership of Ministries, Funding Agencies and National RTD Authorities from 14 European countries allowed the first steps towards:
- the exchange of information and fulfilling existing needs to disseminate the results achieved by scientific and technological research applied to the protection of tangible cultural heritage (Heritage Portal web site)
- the launch of joint actions determined by the needs of ministries and agencies (definition of Strategic Research Topics and a Memorandum of Understanding between some countries in order to make common calls)
- the promotion of mutual learning and providing a route toward the greater spread of joint initiatives (definition of a Declaration of Support for the Model Framework for Advanced Education)

Project Context and Objectives:
(Problems to be solved)
The current state of exchange and dissemination of knowledge and information on heritage science can be grouped under the following headings: exchange among researchers, dissemination to policy-makers, to end-users and to professional non-researchers.
The value of heritage science is still all but invisible to policy-makers.
Nevertheless the 6th European Commission conference on "Sustaining Europe's Cultural Heritage:
From Research to Policy" (London, September 2004) affirmed that cultural heritage plays an essential role in Europe, and has a considerable impact in many areas of economic and regional development,while improving skills through technological innovation and social identity. The London Declaration recommended "better collaboration and coordination between the EU Member States, the European Commission, and other International Organisations ...[are necessary] to promote the excellence of European research applied to cultural heritage, to achieve European added value".
The exchange among researchers is fragmented. Researchers are employed in different types of institutions including universities, research institutions, museums, galleries, and other heritage organisations across Europe. Except for the occasional conference, researchers are separated by the institutions that employ them.
The process of science-based conservation is invisible to visitors to the places that depend on it.
There are many examples across Europe, such as the Energy Hall, Science Museum, London, and the Galleria dell' Accademia, Florence, where the public interest in Cultural Heritage has been ignited by technological innovation. The growth of the Internet and in-situ interactive displays provides new opportunities to convey an awareness of the richness of cultural heritage and its conservation, including conservation science.
The literatures of heritage science are invisible to non-researchers potentially interested in them.
Literatures can be made more directly "visible" to professional non-researchers either by unrestricted access to and searchability of the primary literature immediately against payment, or through open access to authors' written works after a short period of time, or by creating a heritage community portal.
The Tangible Cultural Heritage Research Area needs to attain the following principal benefits:
- coordinating actions within the European partnership, aiming to promote and maintain the excellence of European research applied to tangible cultural heritage;
- favouring the protection of the moveable and immoveable tangible heritage through measures designed for an integrated and sustainable development of the European environment;
- expanding the potential of the cultural heritage research sector, which has much in common with environmental and social sustainability, in particular, underpinning collaborative research in the fields of Sustainability and Cultural Heritage, Environmental Technologies, Global Change, Environmental Impact Assessment;
- enhancing the dissemination of research results and news in the field of protection of tangible cultural heritage;
- increasing the visibility of the social and economic importance of the cultural heritage sector both at the European level and among single member states;
- supporting educational and training programmes and activities in the sector;
- developing a common framework of policies aimed at improving the protection of cultural heritage;
- favouring common actions aimed at promoting European Cultural Heritage research outside Europe.

(NET-HERITAGE objectives and approach)
The NET HERITAGE project set out to achieve the following objectives:
- To contribute to the establishment of the European Research Area by improving the coherence and coordination of RTD efforts across Europe in the field of Research applied to the Protection for Tangible Cultural Heritage
- To underpin long-term perspectives in European research policies applied to Cultural Heritage
- To support related policies (Lisbon agenda, Sustainable development and Environment, Education, Tourism, Energy, Agriculture, Transport, Regional, Enterprises, Competition, Employment)
- To foster innovation and sustainable development in this important European sector;
- To address social issues of national programmes within a wider framework (science & society)
- To facilitate mutual learning and enhance multidisciplinary partnerships;
- To improve coordination of national research activities and minimising unintended duplication and redundancy;
The bottom-up nature of NET-HERITAGE was a challenging opportunity for programme owners and managers to underpin catalytic actions in support of RTD research applied to tangible cultural heritage.
NET-HERITAGE has satisfied a demand that exists in the research community involved in the protection of tangible cultural heritage, for an instrument capable of combining the advantages offered by national programmes over their international equivalent (e.g. the greater familiarity of researchers with local administrative procedures and personnel) with the benefits peculiar to international programmes (e.g. access to broader pools of both complementary expertise and resources).
NET-HERITAGE has facilitated the exchange of information and fulfils existing needs for disseminating the results achieved by scientific and technological research applied to the protection of tangible cultural heritage.
NET-HERITAGE has facilitated the launch of joint actions determined by the needs of ministries and agencies.
NET-HERITAGE has promoted mutual learning and provided a route towards the greater spread of joint initiatives.

Project Results:
According to the three main issues, Information Exchange, Strategic Activities and Joint Activities, the work performed and results are summarised below.
STEP 1. Information exchange
This first step dealt with the systematic exchange of information, best practices concerning the management of running RTD programmes on the Protection of Tangible Cultural Heritage (WP1) and the implementation of the European NET-HERITAGE Observatory on exchange of cultural heritage research information (WP2).
WP1: Systematic exchange of information and best practices concerning the management of running RTD programmes on the Protection of Tangible Cultural Heritage.
Within this issue the Ministry of Education and Science (MES) of Bulgaria, performed activities focusing on an overall assessment of Research Programmes applied to the Protection of Tangible
Cultural Heritage (TCH), through information exchange among Partners on capacities, national management, financing mechanisms, procedures, practices and evaluation.
WP1 constructed an information system that maps strategies, research programmes and research institutions in the field of Tangible Cultural Heritage protection, such as, actors, implementation, funding, duration, evaluation and dissemination. The information collected in a questionnaire and systematically stored in the information system enabled the identification of best practices (task 1.2.), the benchmarking of the management of research programmes (task 1.3.) and the mapping of participation in international programmes (task 1.4.). The material in the information system is unique in the sense that it gives the first overview of existing research programmes in this domain.
This preliminary mapping shows that, in strategic terms, the interaction between the government bodies in charge of cultural heritage and those in charge of research has to be reinforce, in order to ensure a broad, sustainable framework for Tangible Cultural Heritage research.
Some major conclusions were that all participating countries have funding schemes to support Tangible Cultural Heritage research activities.
The 14 partners of Net-Heritage identified 41 research programmes, proving the interest for this domain in Europe. Out of them, 13 key research programmes were identified in 10 countries, most of which are still running (Deliverable 1.1 Inventory of the key national strategies and research programmes applied to the protection of Tangible Cultural Heritage ).
The latter programmes reveal more similarities than differences in their management, and their scope is broadly overlapping. Most countries commission research projects by organizing open calls on a very regular basis (6 programmes are even organising calls on an annual basis, which demonstrates the space for cooperation among these programmes). Evaluation procedures place scientific excellence at the centre of concern and rely in almost all cases on independent peer review, with a steering committee responsible for the final arbitrages.
Unfortunately, in only a few cases can foreign research centres apply for a call and be funded, leading to the conclusion that these programmes do not really allow international cooperation among scientists.
Finally, budgets allocated to research in Tangible Cultural Heritage seem rather limited -even though some countries are putting special emphasis on the topic (e.g. France, UK).
Based on the analyses of the global strategy in terms of political and organisational frames, and of the programmes with a focus on the management, 45 Best Practices were identified. and a list of research centres of excellence has also been produced (Deliverable 1.2 Assessment Report of national RTD programmes and synergies between the programmes of participants in terms of management, financial issues and evaluation procedures).
Recommendations on common approaches were generated in consultation and with the consensus of all the Partners, and were provided to the NET-HERITAGE Observatory (WP2) for wider dissemination. Furthermore, this first mapping in the field of TCH research will be the basis for the implementation of future joint actions (Deliverable 1.3 Recommendations on common approaches).
Using the process of benchmarking, recommendations on common approaches were developed with the intention to obtain an idea of how to introduce better processes and standards within the field of TCH research in order to develop future cooperation (Deliverable 1.4 assessment report on participation in bilateral, European and international programmes in the field of protection of Tangible Cultural Heritage ). In particular, bilateral and multilateral programmes in which NET-HERITAGE partners participate provide opportunities for cooperation in research on Tangible Cultural Heritage. In bilateral programmes, cultural heritage is often a priority theme. However, the bilateral projects for specific research on Tangible Cultural Heritage are limited. Cooperation in the field is implemented mainly through multilateral projects within the framework programmes for research, technological development and demonstration activities.
Therefore, the JPI "Cultural Heritage and Global change: a challenge for Europe and prioritization of the research field in FP8- Horizon 2020" will be important for the sustainability of the achieved results, as well as future achievements.
Cooperation in common calls for research projects, with a virtual pot or common calls funding, might prove to be the appropriate cooperation mechanism.
The other activity in STEP 1 (Information exchange) was WP2: European Net-Heritage Observatory on Cultural Heritage Research Exchange of Information.
The NET-HERITAGE Observatory constitutes a permanent central access point on all issues relating to European cultural heritage for a wide variety of stakeholders, including Members of the European Parliament, leading researchers and SMEs. An innovative and key instrument for information exchange, it was active throughout the project and provided the basis for future dissemination and collaboration activities.
Within this issue the activities performed by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), United Kingdom, focused on the following tasks:
* Creation of the Editorial Advisory Board & UK stakeholders group
The Editorial Advisory Board (EAB) was established in November 2008, consisting of 11 members, including two external experts. The role of the EAB was to facilitate the provision of content to the Observatory, add value through the review of all content types, monitor the quality and relevance of information, and evaluate the need for multilinguality.
As part of task 2.1, a sample content template was designed for systematically gathering content for the Observatory. Observatory development meant that content could then be uploaded directly to the portal via the user logging in to the site, as opposed to using the template.
Strategic objectives and requirements of the Observatory were identified by the NET HERITAGE project partners, and the key audiences were profiled. A survey was conducted using a combination of telephone interviews and an online survey questionnaire, to identify the strategic objectives and requirements of the project partners. Following the work conducted through the questionnaires and interviews, a Functional Specification was drafted.
A UK stakeholders group was set up and met regularly. During its meeting, information on the UK role in NET HERITAGE was communicated, and the mechanisms for gathering content for the NET HERITAGE Observatory were discussed. A rapid build period of the Observatory based on the previously drafted Functional Specification then followed. Two test phases were built into the timetable and all Partners and Stakeholders were required to take part.
In December 2009, a beta version of the Observatory web portal was launched. All Partners were required to add content and feedback comments and suggestions for the site.
All content contributed by partners was uploaded onto the Observatory and new members of the site also contributed content. The project manager and web developer worked closely to correct any technical problems encountered by users following the release of the beta site. Changes were made to the site with the aim of improving usability e.g. links were added to each page to allow the user to "jump" from one section to another without the need to navigate back to the homepage.
The Editorial Advisory Board recommended that, for the site to reach a high enough standard for a public launch, the recruitment of an editor would be vital, in view of the rapid pace of development and the improved currency required.
* Consultative workshop
A consultative workshop for the Observatory was held on 22 September 2010 in the UK. The event was attended by NET HERITAGE partners, a select number of national experts and UK stakeholders.
The aim of the workshop was twofold: i) to showcase the Observatory to a small, select audience by demonstrating the stage of development of the beta site at that point in time, and, ii) to gain feedback from a users' perspective which could contribute towards the ongoing development of the site during the final year of the project. After the workshop all feedback was organised into two categories: feasibility and priority. The actions ranged between easily rectified errors and suggestions for relatively small changes to the site's appearance, to much more substantial comments regarding the depth of the content on the site. The necessary developments and improvements were then carried out by both the project manager and the web developer over the final year in order to improve the content, functionality and usability of the site.
* Site Name Change
In May 2011 the name of the web portal was officially changed from 'The Observatory' to the 'Heritage Portal'. This resulted from the recommendation of the project officers at the EC, favouring the choice of a more sustainable name for the site, and one that better reflected the continuity between the NET HERITAGE Project and JHEP Project, the Coordination Action project supporting the JPI: Cultural Heritage and Global Change: a challenge for Europe (JPI CH), under which the site was planned to continue.
STEP.2 (Strategic Activities)
Within this STEP, in view of the multidisciplinarity currently characterising the research area in the field of the protection of Tangible Cultural Heritage at the national programme level, strategic activities among RTD programmes on Tangible Cultural Heritage (WP3) focused on the following research priorities:
- Improved assessment of indoor and outdoor environments;
- Environmental monitoring (pollution, climate change, seismic risks);
- Innovative tools for non-destructive or minimal invasive damage diagnosis;
- Easy to handle and low cost measurement instruments for practical use by end-users, especially SMEs;
- Innovative materials and technologies for conservation and maintenance;
- Evaluation of treatments and materials used in conservation both at present and over recent decades, assessing their suitability and future consequences;
- Conservation of modern materials used in contemporary art and architecture and also in cultural information storage (CDs, DVDs, etc.)
- Evaluation and management of anthropic pressure;
- Security technologies and systems in museums, libraries, archives and for the movement of artefacts;
- Tele-surveys and Geographic Information Systems for the protection and management of TCH.
The WP 3 performed by the Ministry of University and Research (MUR), Italy, was structured into 3 Tasks.
The main result reported in Deliverable 3.1 (Report on common research gaps and priorities) achieved within Task 3.1 was the identification of 11 topics, with subtopics on which each Country expressed a score from 1 (low) to 5 (high) on needs, strengths and priorities.
This followed a process of national consultation, through the set up of national consultation panels composed of scientific experts and stakeholders. It provided for the first time a geographical distribution of needs, strengths and scientific priorities at the national level in the field of research applied to the Tangible Cultural Heritage protection.
The 11 identified topics were:
- Environmental assessment and monitoring (pollution, climate change, seismic risk)
- Investigation of damage mechanisms to establish preventive conservation strategies
- Measurement instruments of practical relevance for end-users
- Innovation on materials and technologies for conservation and maintenance
- Evaluation of treatments and materials used in conservation at present and over recent decades, assessing their suitability and future consequences
- Alteration and conservation of materials with special focus on modern materials used in contemporary Art and Architecture and also as cultural information storage (CDs, DVDs, etc)
- Anthropic pressure evaluation and management
- Security technologies and systems in museums, libraries, archives and for the movement of artefacts
- Tele-survey and Geographic Information System for protection and management of Tangible

Cultural Heritage
- Contemporary cultural heritage in spatial contexts
- Prenormative studies for the guaranteed protection and management of Tangible Cultural Heritage
In Deliverable 3.2 (Report on the possible convergence of RTD programmes and planning of common national research strategies in this domain) the evaluations carried out within the NET HERITAGE Partnership were processed, in order to give evidence of the national distribution of needs and competence, and to identify the convergence on common priorities.
Three thresholds for common priority identification were defined, as high, medium and low priorities, as follows:
- High priorities determined from 10 out of 14 countries giving scores 4 or 5
- Medium priorities determined from 8 out of 9 countries giving scores 4 or 5
- Low priorities determined from less than 8 countries giving scores 4 or 5
Great attention was paid to finding the best and simplest way of expressing a transferable synthesis of the expression of interest. i
The HIGH PRIORITIES LIST produced includes the following sub-topics:
2.1 Multidisciplinary approach on the synergic interactions between environment and materials.
2.2 Interactions between specific environmental factors (temperature, humidity..) and complex artefacts made by different materials.
3.1 Portable instruments for in situ measurements.
3.2 Non invasive instruments and methodologies for diagnosis and monitoring.
4.1 Development of new and appropriate materials and technologies for the upgrading or the construction of conservation buildings/rooms.
4.2 Development or improvement of products for restoration and conservation with low impact on the historical content of artefacts.
5.2 Innovative solutions for compatibility, durability and reversibility of new materials and treatments.
6.1 Development of strategies and procedures for storage and preservation of multi media supports and readability of the stored content.
6.2 Innovative proposals for conservation and durability of contemporary art materials (i. e. plastics, ceramics, new alloys, glasses, new dyes, concrete, mortars).
7.1 Development of management systems on quality and sustainability of indoor/outdoor cultural
heritage environments.
7.3 Development of scientific criteria and tools to measure and regulate tourist impact on cultural heritage sites.
10.1 Preservation of industrial heritage: objects, buildings and landscape. Finally, Deliverable 3.3 (Position paper on research gaps to generate recommendations for future joint activities and European RTD work programme), aimed to identify areas of potential future cooperation for use in generating recommendations for future joint activities. It reports the geographical distribution of the highest scientific priorities and analyses the respective evaluation of needs and strengths.
Major recommendations arising from the survey are:
- European Countries have common priorities and should seek common solutions in the field of research on cultural heritage;
- The list of high research priorities must be used to develop common programmes;
- Cultural heritage research needs to be included on the National Research Agenda;
- The presented survey can be used as a tool for an a la carte approach, on which to base the Joint Programming Initiative (JPI) Cultural Heritage and Global Change: a new challenge for Europe;
- The list of common high priorities should be taken into due account in the definition of the EU Framework Programme on Research and Innovation, Horizon 2020.
Finally, the survey highlights the strength of European research in the field of cultural heritage, and recommends that this research capability, which is assumed as a world reference point, is exploited to reinforce European competitiveness.

STEP. 3 was represented by the Joint Activities.
The implementation of common activities was achieved through the identification of common priorities to be incorporated in national RTD programmes, strategic test cases and common policies.
This STEP was carried out through the implementation of two Work Packages:
WP4 - Implementation of joint activities through the coordination between national RTD programmes on tangible cultural heritage; and WP5 - Implementation of joint activities through the coordination of advanced training in the field of tangible cultural heritage.
WP4, performed by the German Federal Foundation for the Environment (DBU), Germany, was designed to follow on from the establishment of strategic activities for the implementation of joint working mechanisms and joint action plans between Partners.
The five deliverables and two milestones encompassed were thus intended to allow the partners of the consortium as a whole to understand where and how chances and potentials for joint activities were to be harnessed (4.1 and 4.2), which requirements were needed to proceed (4.3), and how the public as well as national and European decision-makers could be reached to promote support and funding for the protection of TCH (4.4). An attempt was also made to weave this European process into the broader fabric of Tangible Cultural Heritage research worldwide (4.5).
The task of developing a theoretically viable strategy for joint progress in the Tangible Cultural Heritage field was immensely influenced by a rapid and helpful European development. During 2009 and 2010, much leverage was gained by the successful application of a new tool within the European Union's scientific policy arsenal, first conceived in 2007 during the Swedish presidency. The possibility of member state driven Joint Programming Initiatives (JPI) on common needs opened a new approach to TCH, which was, as a core issue of European identity, identified and established as a topic for the first JPI based approach.
In WP4, Task 1 explored cooperation mechanisms to enable future joint-funding "Test-issues programmes" in the priority fields and frontier domains. The task also dealt with keen interest of the majority of the partners in launching common calls.
Specific funding mechanisms (especially MES -Bulgaria, MCC - France, MICINN - Spain, AHRC - United Kingdom and ANCS - Romania) were investigated and the preferred funding mode for a call which would be a virtual mode was confirmed.
Subsequently, the degree of convergence of RTD programmes was analysed. This included highlighting the steps required to implement transnational research programmes and coordinated joint calls for proposals. On the basis of FP6 evaluation studies, NET HERITAGE WP1 deliverables, analysis of other selected ERA NET and Netwatch documents, the Deliverable 4.2 (The degree of Convergence of European RTD programmes and possibilities for common foresight) presents potential schemes of call management and evaluation procedures.
In the subsequent task, the importance of the cultural heritage sector within member states and on he European level was demonstrated by a large conference that took place on 24 March 2011 in Brussels, by the participation in the Green Paper Consultation of the European Commission in May 2011, and by a Parliamentary event held on 28 September in Berlin (see dissemination activities below).
Mechanisms of RTD programme networking for the enhancement of cooperation frameworks and integration in pre-accession, among EU geographical neighbours and non-EU geographical neighbour nations, were the issues explored in Deliverable 4.5 (A draft action plan for common RTD Programme initiatives in pre-accession countries, EU geographical neighbours and non-EU geographical neighbours). A survey was performed on cultural heritage research funding in 16 countries not part of NET-HERITAGE, including Norway, Croatia, Turkey and Israel.
In conclusion, the work done in WP 4 was increasingly connected to the JPI CH process.
Already after 18 months, the WP members chose to respond to the opportunities that became visible as the JPI CH process for Tangible Cultural Heritage research became a distinct option. On the basis of the thorough work done by the NET HERITAGE consortium as a whole, this helped to finally unlock immense and unexpected synergies for both processes, leading to an early call within the Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage and Global Change (JPI CH) and JHEP project (the Coordination Action to support the JPI CH).
The basis for a common research agenda was set up by the formulation of research priorities and by the identification of best practise of funding at the national level.
Partners of the NET-HERITAGE Consortium are participating in the "Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage and Global Change", which officially started in October 2011. Within the JPI CH, a common Strategic Research Framework for Cultural Heritage will be created.
Furthermore, most NET-HERITAGE Partners have agreed to participate in a common call. This call will be organised according to the principle of a virtual common pot, which means that under the umbrella of this corporate call, national governments will provide funds for the research by national researchers. The European Commission is invited to support these common activities, which demonstrate the willingness of Partners to cooperate beyond the framework of NET-HERITAGE.
The implementation of WP 5 'Implementation of joint activities through the coordination of advanced training in the field of Tangible Cultural Heritage performed by Ministry of Culture and National Heritage (MKDN), Poland, resulted in a 'Report on opportunities in advanced education in conservation-restoration and science for conservation in Europe'.
The report was based on information provided by all partner countries of the Net-Heritage project in the 'Questionnaire on the opportunities in advanced training in conservation-restoration and science for conservation in Europe'. The WP5 team was supported by the Panel of Experts selected from national experts on education in conservation and conservation science nominated by the project partners - Dr. Martina Caruana, Malta, Professor May Cassar, United Kingdom, Professor Annamaria Giovagnoli, Italy, Professor Roman Kozlowski, Poland, Professor Rocco Mazzeo, Italy.
Additionally, one external expert - Professor René Larsen, Denmark - was asked to join the Panel.
The six experts represented different backgrounds and professional areas and provided insight into various training schemes in different parts of Europe.
Based on the survey, the Panel of Experts made a number of recommendations forming the Model Framework for Advanced Education.
They are believed to be essential for encouraging opportunities to carry out advanced study and research in the broadest possible range of disciplines of the heritage field, and thereby better meet the many challenges to the long-term preservation of European cultural heritage.
The second phase of the WP5 implementation consisted of defining of the Model Framework for Advanced Education, and also opened the process of dissemination of the approach proposed by the NET HERITAGE project. The proposed Framework was presented to decision-makers and institutions involved in education in conservation-restoration and science based conservation. As a result, 10 ministries, funding agencies and other relevant institutions in the partner states responsible for funding and managing culture, education and research, signed a Declaration of Support for the Framework.
Support for the Framework was also obtained from ENCORE, the European Network for Conservation-Restoration Education, a network organisation of higher education institutions in the field of conservation-restoration, which currently has 42 members from 20 countries and 26 partners.
ENCoRE signed the Declaration of Support and decided to promote the NET HERITAGE approach.
As Italy (the Coordinator country) is not a member of ENCoRE, the Declaration of Support was submitted to the Italian Chemistry Society (SCI) at 'XII Congresso Nazionale di Chimica dell'Ambiente e dei Beni Culturali', 'La Scienza Chimica per un'armonica interazione tra Ambiente e Beni Culturali', Taormina, 30th September 2010. The Declaration of Support was recognised by the Italian Chemistry Society (SCI).
The most important results obtained through the activities carried out in this WP can be summarized as follows:
- Development of the 'Report on the opportunities in advanced education in conservation-restoration and science for conservation in Europe' - The report analyses advanced training options in Europe and is based on information provided by all partner countries of the NET-HERITAGE project in the 'Questionnaire on the opportunities in advanced training in conservation-restoration and science for conservation in Europe'. Three categories of advanced education opportunities were distinguished in the report: study and research leading to a doctoral degree, long courses not leading to a doctoral degree, and short courses and other training possibilities. The survey revealed that many institutions offer a diverse range of opportunities for advanced education, study and research, as well as several effective funding mechanisms. At the same time, the survey exposed a fragmented and dispersed field lacking in effective coordination of the educational offer.
- Development of the Model Framework for Advanced Education - Based on the survey, the Panel of Experts supporting the WP5 team made a number of recommendations which, it is believed, are essential for encouraging opportunities to carry out advanced study and research in the broadest possible range of disciplines of the heritage field, and thereby better meet the many challenges to the long-term preservation of European cultural heritage. These recommendations form the Model Framework for Advanced Education.
- Promotion activities through signing Declarations of Support by institutions funding and managing education and science, as well as institutions providing education - Ten ministries, funding agencies and other relevant institutions in the partner states responsible for funding and managing culture, education and research, signed a Declaration of Support for the Model Framework for Advanced Education. To reach the educational institutions, it was decided that the accepted Framework would be presented to ENCoRE. The Net-Heritage project, the WP5 report and recommendations were presented to the ENCoRE by the WP leader, who took part in the ENCoRE general assembly in Vienna, on 27 September 2010. The ENCoRE unanimously voted for signing the Declaration of Support and decided to promote the NET HERITAGE approach.
- Conclusion of an agreement on information exchange between the Net-Heritage project and ENCoRE - ENCoRE decided to supplement the Net-Heritage WP5 report with information on courses provided by the ENCoRE members, which had not been covered by the Net-Heritage survey.
It made the data-base developed within WP5 more exhaustive. The agreement also made it possible for ENCoRE to use information collected within the NET HERITAGE. The agreement has officially enabled the flow of information.
In conclusion, NET-HERITAGE has been welcomed throughout the European Member States as a substantial chance for the improvement of a network of scientific excellence on things most European cultural heritage. It has provided a possibility of joint action in this field. By close cooperation between funding bodies, programme-managers and the scientific community, important results were achieved. Among them, the vastly improved knowledge-basis, such as on funding possibilities, active organisations and individuals, recent but under-published results of research, and important future topics have been embraced by both the scientific community and funding bodies.
Surveys taken within NET-HERITAGE have provided Europe with solid and comprehensive information on common priorities, and the state of play of the scientific field. Fragmentation of the scientific community was addressed and partly remedied in well-attended public workshops and parliamentarian events both on the European level as well as in member states. Common action has clearly indicated the eminent economic importance of cultural heritage to European communities, both on the local and the regional level, as well as to the member states. It also is a strong issue for the cooperation with countries outside the European Union, and provides a chance to let the world profit from European excellence - as well as leading to economic opportunities for European SMEs.
The lack of a greater centralisation but also of proper funding was clearly felt, and is now indicated to the European Union.
Finally, it is essential to underline the strong coordination activities carried out by the Ministry for Cultural Heritage and Activities (MIBAC) among the partners and at the European level, present throughout the life of the NET HERITAGE project. This allowed not only the first successful coordination of Ministries and Research Agencies on the research applied to the protection of tangible cultural heritage, but also the laying of the scientific, cultural and strategic foundations for the proposal, launching and implementation a complex and ambitious process like the Joint Programming Initiative "Cultural Heritage and Global Change : a new Challenge for Europe". The process started in July 2009 on the initiative of the NET HERITAGE Partners, was presented at the Project mid-term meeting on March 2010, and was defined at the Final Meeting on September 2011.
For three years, the NET HERITAGE project served as a vital hub for the exchange of information among countries in terms of research applied to cultural heritage, by promoting dialogue not only among the countries involved but also with other European countries and international bodies. The
Coordination Unit promoted NET HERITAGE at the European and international level, disseminated the results of the project, and also enhanced the importance and visibility of this area of research.
The activities developed under the different WPs were able to produce the necessary evidence, data knowledge and, more generally, information to demonstrate that Cultural Heritage can truly become an opportunity for driving growth and competitiveness throughout Europe.

Potential Impact:
The most important potential impacts developed during the project were as follows:
* The sharing of strategic topics for the Tangible Cultural Heritage research area, which lays the foundation for the development of a Strategic Research Agenda that will guide the JPI CH process;
* The interest generated at the European and international levels in the economic, political, educational and social significance of the cultural heritage sector and the need of greater support for the development of competitiveness in European cultural heritage.
* The start of a permanent instrument of information and networks that will develop and be updated within the JPI Cultural Heritage, such as the HERITAGE PORTAL;
More in detail, the work performed within the NET HERITAGE Project led to the definition of a common Strategic Research Agenda in the field of research and cultural heritage, based on consultation within European Countries for the first time since the EU Framework Programmes on Research.
This result achieved within WP3 envisages the following impacts:
- Enhanced coordination framework for partners engaged in national programmes and activities in the field of protection of tangible cultural heritage;
- Better integration within a European Research Area (ERA) network;
- New approach leading to the convergence of long-term research strategies;
- Prerequisites for joint transnational research activities on a European scale;
- Fostering and implementation of debate within the national research networks in the field, including national research institutions, universities, stakeholders and technology platforms;
- Identification and analysis of common strategic RTD priorities
- Creation of the basis for the proposal and implementation of the JPI "Cultural Heritage and Global
Change: a new Challenge for Europe" Similarly, the recommendations forming the Framework for Advanced Education in the field of conservation-restoration and science for conservation developed within the NET-HERITAGE project are essential for encouraging opportunities to carry out advanced study and research in a broadest possible range of disciplines of the heritage field, and thereby to better meet the many challenges to the long-term preservation of European cultural heritage. The framework will improve opportunities of advanced study and research, enable the development of a more effective cadre, and ensure sustainable public access and protection of cultural heritage. It is also essential for the competitiveness of the European heritage sector, knowledge export, and the leadership of Europe in this area.
Moreover, ten institutions funding and managing education and science returned the signed Declarations of Support for the Framework for Advanced Education:
- Belgium - Miriam Serck-Dewaide the Director of the Royal Institute;
- Germany - Lutz Töpfer the Head of the Environment and Cultural Assets Division at the DBU (German Federal Foundation for the Environment).
- Island - Katrin Jakobsdottir the Minister of Education, Science and Culture.
- Italy - Antonia Recchia General Director of the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities.
- Latvia - Ints Dalderis the Minister for Culture of the Republic of Latvia.
- Poland - Bogdan Zdrojewski the Minister of Culture and National Heritage.
- Slovenia - Majda Sirca the Minister of Culture and Franci Demsar the Director of the Slovenian Research Agency.
- Spain - Anibal Gonzalez Perez General Directorate for Research and Management of R&D Plan of the Ministry of Science and Innovation.
- UK - Shearer West the Director of Research of the Arts and Humanities Research Council.
However, of course, the main impact of the project was approved by the GPC in November 2009 of the JPI CH. For the first time, cultural heritage was included among the major societal challenges along with Health and Food.
Thanks to the collaboration and intensive work produced, also by the NET HERITAGE partners, Italy had the honour of coordinating the JPI on Cultural Heritage And Global Change : A New Challenge For Europe.
In terms of dissemination, WP leaders conducted, throughout the project's life, many activities.
In particular, for the Cultural Heritage Observatory, a 3-phase marketing and communications plan was established in October 2009 consisting of:
1) Internal communication,
2) Strategic marketing to target potential Contributors and Sector Stakeholders,
3) Targeted marketing to promote future Users and visitors to the Observatory.
For each phase, the potential audience was established, and the key marketing messages, the call to action and delivery channels for targeting them were identified.
Following the beta site launch in December 2009 a PowerPoint presentation outlining the function of the Observatory (then known as the Heritage Portal) was distributed to each Net-Heritage project partner for use as they felt appropriate (at events, conferences etc.) as a promotional and information dissemination tool.
A monthly newsletter was created, with the first issue disseminated in July 2011. The newsletter functioned as both a promotional and information dissemination tool.
As of 13 October 2011 a total of 258 users have signed up to The Heritage Portal (which includes uploading their personal/professional profiles) and over 200 people have signed up to receive the monthly Heritage Portal newsletter.
A flyer was produced at the beginning of 2011, which functioned as both a promotional tool as well as a user guide, with instructions of how to sign up and contribute to the Observatory. Batches of 150 flyers were sent to each partner to distribute at their own national events, and an electronic version was also provided to partners to allow for translated versions to be produced and disseminated via email.
There are consistently between 200 and 300 hits on the site each working week day.
At the consultative workshop the Heritage Portal was showcased to a total of 38 academics and national experts in the field of cultural heritage research.
At least six major dissemination events took place, especially in the last two years of project.
An international workshop 'Heritage science in a changing world' was organised by the Polish partner, at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland in April 2010. The workshop was divided into two parts - the short conference in the morning session contained general lectures concerning heritage science and education, while the afternoon session comprised two pilot courses presenting the approach recommended by the NET HERITAGE project. The event was attended by over 100 participants from across Europe. It was opened by Piotr #uchowski, Secretary of State at the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage. The special guest of the event was Baroness Sharp of Guildford, the Chair of the Inquiry of the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee on 'Science and Heritage', who gave a lecture on the background and impact of the Inquiry. Lukasz Bratasz presented the 'Report on the opportunities in advanced education in conservation restoration and science for conservation in Europe' - Deliverable 5.1 of the NET HERITAGE project. A considerable part of the model framework focused on study and research for a doctoral degree, and one of its key recommendations was to embed in doctoral educational programmes modules developing communication and presentation skills, ability to design and manage projects and similar aspects. Subsequently, Peter Brimblecombe, Director of the Science Graduate School of the University of East Anglia, presented an ideal profile of the 21st century PhD student basing his lecture on the experiences of the PhD Programme of his University.
The morning lectures provided the background to the two parallel knowledge-exchange workshops of the afternoon. The recommendations of the model framework encouraged national research funding agencies to support such workshops as a way of disseminating project outcomes. The workshop led by Peter Brimblecombe - 'Managing heritage and access in an uncertain future' - concentrated on the impact of global climate change on the conservation of outdoor materials, and how it may also affect visitors' habits and preferences, which in turn influences the use patterns of heritage, with consequent impacts on economics and management.
Participants took part in an interactive heritage game to explore the potential impact of climate change on European cultural heritage. The second workshop led by Matija Strli# (Centre for Sustainable Heritage, University College London) - 'E=MC2: Efficiency is Micro-Climate Control' - concentrated on collections, and presented micro-climate control as an alternative to environmental management of large indoor environments. Participants discussed decision-making processes for the care of collections through case studies.
A conference called "Increasing Europe's competitiveness through cultural heritage research", organized by DBU partner, took place on 24 March, 2011, at the Committee of the Regions in Brussels. A total of 180 guests attended the Brussels event, among them two MEPs, the Secretary General of Europa Nostra, Ms Sneska Quaedvlieg-Mihailovic and the Slovenian Minister for the Environment, Mr Rokko Zarnic. Antonia Recchia, project coordinator, introduced the Net-Heritage project, Luisa Prista, Head of the Unit on « Environmental technologies of European Commission, Research and Innovation Directorate General, illustrated the current state and perspectives of Cultural Heritage within EU research policy, and Cristina Sabbioni introduced the JPI CH.
Another major event, again organized by the DBU partner, was a parliamentary evening that took place on 28 September, 2011, at the Pergamum Museum in Berlin. Members of all parties of the German Bundestag attended the event, including Petra Merkel, responsible for the Bundestag budget committee.
Finally, great importance was attributed to the end of the project, when a 3-day NET HERITAGE final meeting (21 - 23 September) event was organized at the Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali, Rome, Italy, to give maximum visibility to the main results of the project.
On the first day, a short conference, 'Science and cultural heritage in European training', was organised to promote the project's vision of how advanced education and research should be organised effectively. The programme included an introductory part, during which information on the project and, in particular, the outcome of the activities of WP5, were presented by the project leaders. Two experts gave opening lectures introducing the topic of the short conference - science and cultural heritage in European training.
- Antonia Recchia, project coordinator - Introduction of the NET HERITAGE project
- Cristina Sabbioni 'The impact of Net-Heritage Project: new perspectives in RTD'
- Lidia Laura Rissotto 'The role of Restoration and Conservation Advanced Schools in training restorers'
- Luigi Campanella 'Education and research in Sciences applied to Cultural Heritage'.
The introductory part was followed by six key-note presentations focusing on various areas of conservation science and the transfer of innovative solutions and methodologies into the practical conservation sector:
- 'Model Framework for Advanced Education in Conservation and Science for Conservation'. May Cassar, a member of the NET HERITAGE Panel of Experts and Director of the Centre for Sustainable Heritage, University College London, presented the model framework developed by the Net-Heritage project and set a frame for further presentations and discussion of the conference.
- 'Science and Cultural Heritage at the Getty Conservation Institute'. Giacomo Chiari, Chief cientist at the Getty Conservation Institute, surveyed the progress in transferring innovative non-destructive instrumental techniques to the conservation field, so that they can be used in the analysis and diagnosis of a wide range historic materials and objects, and in tracing directly physical micro-damage to ensure their safe preservation.
- 'The Art of Nanoscience for the Conservation of Art'. Luigi Dei, Associate Professor of Physical Chemistry at the Department of Chemistry of the University of Florence, demonstrated how nanoscience and nanotechnology are revolutionising approaches to conservation by providing materials tailored to the specific requirements of conservation treatments.
- 'Mathematical models of stone damage'. Roberto Natalini, Research Director at the IAC-CNR, drew attention to role of mathematics in providing effective tools to simulate deterioration processes.
Scientific understanding and modelling of how changes in environmental conditions ultimately affect heritage is crucial to the development of rational guidelines for responsible and affordable maintenance and management of heritage objects of different nature and exposure to environmental impacts.
- 'International experiences in education for Cultural Heritage'. Mario Micheli, Associate Professor of Museology & Art and Restoration Criticism at Roma Tre University, spoke about new developments in education for conservation in the international context.
- 'Research results applied to practical conservation-restoration within the area of leather and parchment'. Rene Larsen, Rector of the School of Conservation of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, used science-based conservation-restoration of leather and parchment to illustrate how knowledge transfer workshops and courses can provide conservation practitioners with an updated picture of the chemical and physical nature of heritage materials, their ageing processes, and usceptibility to deterioration caused by environment. He demonstrated the necessity of using adequate techniques for evaluating the state of preservation of materials and guiding their preservation.
A Flyer and a book abstract were produced and distributed during the event.
On the second day, the NET HERITAGE project internal meeting was held in the presence of the European Commission, and the third day, 23 September, was devoted to the official launch of the Heritage Portal and NET HERITAGE project Final Event.
The Heritage Portal Launch featured presentations by Antonia Recchia (Net-Heritage Coordinator, MiBAC), Philip Campbell (Editor-in-Chief, Nature), Professor Simon Keay (University of Southampton) and Rick Rylance (CEO, AHRC).
The public launch of the Heritage Portal in Rome was attended by over 150 people, some of whom were journalists, who helped to disseminate information about the site and its function.
A press release was also disseminated on the morning of the public launch of the Heritage Portal, in order to alert a wide audience to the existence and availability of this online resource.
The Heritage Portal Launch was followed by short presentations by all of the WPs leaders, who presented the main project results.
The event concluded with a round table, to which were invited representatives of countries that have a crucial role in implementing the JPI CH. They included Ireland, which inherits the Heritage Portal, and will continue its expansion and dissemination, and Turkey, which will have the important task of promoting the expansion of JPI to non-EU countries, the USA and BRIC.
The Heritage Portal was also disseminated to 25 European researchers taking the European course on Climate Change, Cultural Heritage and Risk between 3 - 7 October, 2011, held at the European University Centre for Cultural Heritage, Villa Rufolo, Ravello, Italy.

List of Websites:
The NET HERITAGE Project Web site (http://www.netheritage.eu), opened to the public on 15 October 2008, was continuously up-dated during the duration of the project. It addresses policy-makers and end-users, and includes all information concerning meetings, minutes, deliverables, and exploitation of results.
The other main website output of the project is Net Heritage Observatory changed in Heritage Portal
www.heritageportal.eu

Informazioni correlate

Contatto

Antonia Recchia, (Director General)
Tel.: +0667232606
Fax: +0667233026
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Numero di registrazione: 184328 / Ultimo aggiornamento: 2016-06-23