Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

FP7

SWARM Report Summary

Project reference: 303485
Funded under: FP7-JTI

Periodic Report Summary 2 - SWARM (Demonstration of Small 4-Wheel fuel cell passenger vehicle Applications in Regional and Municipal transport)

Project Context and Objectives:
Significant progress on development activities and preparation for demonstration activities were achieved during the second period of the project. This follows a short break in the demonstration activities during which a full review of the project was conducted allowing a rebalancing of the activities to ensure they are aligned with the partners’ commercial plans and that they benefit the regional H2 deployment plans in the respective project’s regions.

Key progresses in the last period include:
• Development and beginning of operation for two MicroCab Hydrogen Electric Vehicles (H2EVs) in Coventry (UK) alongside started process for recommissioning of Hydrogen Refuelling Station (HRS) at Coventry University (to be completed in Nov. 15). The fleet will soon be completed by an additional 8 vehicles, including the newly developed HyLITE vehicles. The existing HRS at Birmingham University will be recommissioned in early 2016, consolidating further the hydrogen refuelling network in the Midlands (UK).
• Successful build of the Riversimple Mark2 Alpha pre-production prototype, with innovative powertrain. The car is running and will be launched publicly in January 2016. The host city for the 2016 trial of 20 cars in the UK is under wraps for the time being but will be announced shortly. Site planning for the refuelling is the next phase of development, along with the go-ahead to build the trial cars.
• The Air Liquide HRS in Belgium on the Toyota premises in Zaventem has been confirmed. This station will be the first public HRS in Belgium and will connect the country to the European hydrogen network. The station can refill between 30 and 40 cars a day with each refill taking less than 5 minutes and will be operational by mid-2016.

Additional information can be found on the news section of the SWARM website: http://swarm-project.eu/news.html

The second period of the project was marked by significant changes to the project’s plan and scope and, to some extent, by a renegotiation of the project’s objectives.

The project was suspended starting from 01/09/2014 (M23) following a technical review by the FCH JU programme office that was held in July 2014 (M20). The project restarted officially on 01/06/2015 (M24) after renegotiation with the FCH JU. The activities for the project remain globally the same but the total number of vehicles was reduced and timespan adapted to ensure that the project objectives can be met.

The overarching objectives of the project remain the same. They are listed below.
1. Fleets of critical mass – by deploying hydrogen technologies in small vehicle classes, large vehicle fleets (up to 20 in each region).
2. Low cost small vehicles – the vehicles produced in this project will all have low volume production costs below 80,000 euros (in one case, the costs are below 50,000 euros).
3. New regional hydrogen fuelling networks – the project will enable the deployment of clusters of hydrogen filling stations in cities in all three European regions.
4. Increased density of fuelling in Europe – the three regions are well situated to extend Europe’s fuelling network, connecting Hamburg and the Scandinavian regions to Benelux and France and extending the hydrogen network in the UK out from London towards Scotland.
5. Demonstrate a complementary approach to hydrogen vehicle drive trains – these vehicles are all built in battery dominant hybrid mode. This is a novel approach, which optimises the cost, performance and energy efficiency of both battery and fuel cell/hydrogen storage technologies.
6. European SME’s – the project involves a range of European SME’s facilitating the introduction of dynamic new European companies into Europe’s hydrogen economy.
7. Strong involvement of European research institutions.
8. Maximum exposure.
9. Seed regions for future commercial rollout – the project supplies 3 new refuelling station sites in 3 new cluster regions.
10. As far as hydrogen supply is concerned, the employment of hydrogen derived from renewable energy sources or as by-product of chemical processes will be preferred.

The coming period (P3) will see key milestones for the project achieved with the demonstration activities staring in the three European regions and vehicles and supporting refuelling infrastructure starting operation. This will be presented to the public during a public kick-off dissemination event (most likely to be organised by in September 2016).

Project Results:
Key progresses in the last period include:
• Development and beginning of operation for two MicroCab Hydrogen Electric Vehicles (H2EVs) in Coventry (UK) alongside a recommissioned Hydrogen Refuelling Station (HRS). The fleet will soon be completed by an additional 8 vehicles, including the newly developed HyLITE vehicles. The existing HRS at Coventry and Birmingham University will be recommissioned shortly (Nov. 15 and Feb. 16), consolidating further the hydrogen refuelling network in the Midlands (UK).
• Successful build of the Riversimple Mark2 Alpha pre-production prototype, with innovative powertrain. The car is running and will be launched publicly in January 2016. The host city for the 2016 trial of 20 cars in the UK is under wraps for the time being but will be announced shortly. Site planning for the refuelling is the next phase of development, along with the go-ahead to build the trial cars.
• Commissioning work for the Air Liquide HRS will start in Belgium on the Toyota premises in Zaventem (in Oct. 15). This station will be the first public HRS in Belgium and will connect the country to the European hydrogen network. The station can refill between 30 and 40 cars a day with each refill taking less than 5 minutes and will be operational by mid-2016.

Potential Impact:
The project will deliver the following results that are key to the achievement of the FCH JU goals:
• enlargement of existing hydrogen refuelling sites and addition of new sites to interlink regions of hydrogen fleet operation
• employment of fleets of passenger and small transport vehicles
• provision of 35 and 70 MPa refuelling infrastructure at selected sites in the three regions, supplying up to 200 kg H2/day per region, ensuring that more than 50 cars or 5 buses can be re-fuelled per day in each region and 5 cars or 1-2 buses can be re-fuelled within one hour; concept for upgrading filling stations to 100 vehicles/day service, depending on the development of consumption figures at the various sites; guarantee of 98% refuelling availability
• hydrogen cost to consumer at station ~€10/kg (plus sales tax); cost improvements to be achieved by higher throughput after adding new customers; hydrogen purity and vehicle refuelling time according to SAE and ISO specifications; total hydrogen production efficiency over 60% due to use of industrial surplus and renewable energy derived hydrogen
• goal of 2,000h vehicle operation lifetime initially, with increase to 5,000h lifetime as project target (not achievable within project duration); MTBF >1,000 km; availability >95% and tank-to-wheel efficiency >40% (NEDC)
• broad dissemination, staff exchange and communication programme.

List of Websites:
www.swarm-project.eu

Contact

Madden, Ben (Senior Consultant)
Tel.: +44 330 119 0980
E-mail
Record Number: 188114 / Last updated on: 2016-08-24