Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

ERC

AdipoDif Result In Brief

Project ID: 205641
Funded under: FP7-IDEAS-ERC
Country: Switzerland

Towards fats that heal

Fat tissue has been considered to be an energy storage medium. Moreover, it has long been believed that fat is completely undesirable causing disorders such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension.
Towards fats that heal
Adipose tissue can be composed of brown or white fat cells or even brown-in-white cells. Recently, research has revealed that these tissues are critical in helping us maintain a healthy metabolism. The key to good health was found to be a balance between energy intake and energy consumption.

Scientists working on the project ADIPODIF (Adipocyte differentiation and metabolic functions in obesity and type 2 diabetes) investigated the role of adipose tissue in good health as well as metabolic disorders. Animal models were used and studies involved genetic manipulation and nutritional intervention using natural compounds.

Study outcomes revealed novel regulatory nodes in obese subjects that helped control fat tissue formation. Researchers proved that activating adipose tissue formation improved and restored metabolic health, a useful fact for treating or preventing type 2 diabetes. In particular, brown adipose tissue helps in burning calories.

Another important finding is the inter-convertibility of white fat into brown fat. As brown fat is metabolically active, converting white fat into brown could prove to be effective in weight loss programmes and obesity treatment.

Currently, ADIPODIF researchers are working on translating the results from animal experiments for clinical implementation. New approaches that increase our energy expenditure could prove to be therapeutically effective for metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Related information

Keywords

Fat, obesity, adipose, brown fat, metabolism, genetic, nutrition, diabetes
Record Number: 188506 / Last updated on: 2016-09-09
Domain: Biology, Medicine