Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Periodic Report Summary 1 - CASSIS (Communication About SocioScientific Issues (CASSIS))

Progress on the CASSIS project has been good and we are following the original workplan.
A Dropbox folder has been established that is accessible to all members of the CASSIS group. The CASSIS website is at: http://blog.soton.ac.uk/mshe/projects/cassis and a newsletter has been developed: http://blog.soton.ac.uk/mshe/files/2014/11/newsletter.pdf
Five face-to-face meetings have been held between the four partner groups, and these have included seminars, workshops, fieldtrips and presentations. These were: Southampton 3-7 February 2014;
Toulouse (ENFA) 7-11 July 2014; Auckland 12-23 January 2015; Southampton 6-10 July 2015; London, 11-15 January 2016.
The initial Southampton meeting was focussed on development an effective communication system between the four universities, establishing the overall strategic plan and individual’s roles. At the first Toulouse meeting, working papers on theoretical frameworks, draft cartographies of controversies about possums (NZ), badgers (UK) and wolves (France), and the dimensions of SSI and SAQs were presented and discussed. The CASSIS group discussed the following question:
What is an appropriate communication framework to examine pest-agriculture interactions?
The research questions were developed. A toolbox of strategies was discussed to collect data to answer the following questions:
• What are people’s epistemological positions on pest-agriculture interactions?
• What are people’s axiological positions on pest-agriculture interactions?
• What are the reflections associated with these epistemological and axiological positions?
The first Auckland meeting focused on developing a common understanding of the theoretical understandings and research strategies, via workshops, field trips, formal presentations, discussions and a formal session where the CASSIS group presented their working papers at the Auckland Museum.
At the next meeting in Southampton, working papers were presented to provide directions for ongoing analysis of the data. There was an opportunity to collectively discuss photo questionnaire data and how this data could be presented so that there was a viable strategy to allow some comparisons between data sets. A series of presentations were given by all partners.
In August 2015, the CASSIS group ran a symposium Building a cartography about an SSI/SAQ at ESERA (European Science Education Research Association) conference in Helsinki. This enabled us to disseminate our findings so far, and receive constructive critique from international science educators to help us hone our work.
The following meeting in London focussed on the development of pedagogical strategies and ways in which data could be collected from this material. The focus was on each team presenting protocols that were used to develop and enhance pedagogical strategies. Presentations were given to critique and further inform a range of pedagogical communicative strategies.
The CASSIS partners have already published some papers in academic journals and further articles are in the pipeline.
Several doctoral and post-doctoral students are also working alongside the CASSIS project, and these students have also been presenting their ongoing research and ideas at the CASSIS meetings. An overall objective is to grow research capability of the ESRs both by establishing closer links between the universities and providing opportunities for these ESRs to develop their research experience.
Consequently the ESERA symposium was organised so that these ESRs were taking part and in some cases presented their group’s contribution. The CASSIS group is very aware that a way of developing and maintain these networks is that there is a commitment for the CASSIS team to present at Science Education and Science Communication conferences wherever possible.
Deliverables
D.2.1 working papers on theoretical frameworks. (Drop box Workshop 2 July Toulouse)
D 2.2- 2.3 Working papers to critique the appropriateness of different research designs; ethics proposals; and develop research questions and a research tool box of strategies to collect and analyse data. (Dropbox Workshop 2 in folders labelled ‘Discussion RQs’, ‘Auckland research’, ‘Tables for analysing’, ‘Ethical frameworks’).
WP 2b Auckland January 2015.
An extension of WP2a occurred with further development of the theoretical frameworks and research strategies that had been first presented in Toulouse.
Tasks 2.1-2.3 Developing a common understanding of the theoretical understandings and research strategies.
This occurred via workshops, field trips, formal presentations, discussions and a formal session where the CASSIs group presented their working papers at the Auckland Museum – 20 January 2015.
Deliverables
D.2.1-2.3 Working papers – theoretical frameworks and critique of research strategies.
See Dropbox - Workshop 3 Auckland labelled as follows:
• Workshop presentations
• Working notes and papers
• Museum presentations – invitation, list of attendees, powerpoints and audio presentations
• Museum organisation - invitation, attendee list and contacts emails
• ESERA symposium development and application.
Workshop presentations:
Each group presented their research that provided a focus for discussion on the theoretical framework for subsequent analysis. These presentations are identified as follows:
• Communication about SSIs – pilot work– UK group
• Using Actor Network Theory to amplify and diversify the diversity of voices in the 1080 debate
(NZ group)
• Mapping and analysing controversies about the use of synthetic pesticides in agriculture at 1983 and at 2007 (French team)
• The heritage management (getion patrimoniale): management of conflicts related to environmental issues on a territory. (Michel Vidal and French team).
Working notes and papers:
Notes, published papers, data and information for developing research projects have been deposited in Dropbox.
Museum organisation and presentations.
The purpose of the invited presentation at the Auckland Museum was to provide an opportunity to critique the research project that is being developed by the research group. It also provided local and national links. The following list of presentations are available in the drop box with pdfs.
• Hullo Possums – unravelling the SSI of 1080 aerial possum control using Actor Network Theory.
(NZ group)
• Badgers curdling the milk. (UK group)
• Socially Acute questions and Socio-Scientific Issues – Laurence Simonneaux
• Wolves in France: a hot potato (French group)
• Identifying participants’ voices in a debate about a controversial issue – Sally Birdsall (NZ) & Paul
Davies (UK).
ESERA symposium
The CASSIS group ran a symposium Building a cartography about an SSI/SAQ at ESERA (European Science Education Research Association) conference in Helsinki (31.08-4.09, 2015). The following papers were presented and these are in the Dropbox.
• Building a cartography about an SSI/SAQ
• Theorising the building of a cartography of SocioScientific Issues (SSIs) /Socially Acute Questions
(SAQs)
• Mapping controversies: pre-service teachers’ mapping of a controversial socio-scientific issue
• Does the analysis of local press allow the building of a map of the controversy about the re-appearance of the Wolf in Lozere?
• Unravelling the SSI/SAQ of 1080 possum control using Actor-Network-Theory (ANT)
WP3. Analysis of data
Task 3.1 an analysis of data that answers research questions posed in WP2b.
Deliverable
D3.1 Working papers that will be presented at Seminar 3 in Southampton. Month 19.
At the meeting in Southampton in July 2015, working papers were presented to provide directions for ongoing analysis of the data. There was an opportunity to collectively discuss photo questionnaire data and how this data could be presented so that there was a viable strategy to allow some comparisons between data sets. The following papers were presented:
• Strategies to improve communication about a Socio-Scientific Issue: Building a map to identify participants and opinions (Bev France & Sally Birdsall) presented at 46th ASERA (Australasian Science Education Research Association ) conference at the University of Western Australia, 1-3 July, 2015.
• A range of analytical frameworks were presented by the French team. That is: Jean Simonneaux – analysis of commitment; Laurence Simonneaux – analytical frameworks to analyse the photoquestionnaire; Laurence Simonneaux – analysis of expression of emotions during argumentation – using Plantin (2011). These frameworks will be used for subsequent analysis of the data that is being collected from the photoquestionnaire.
• Exploration of Prezi mapping to determine how agencies (farmers and conservationists) reflect different power positions (English group – Ralph Levinson)
• PhD students (ESRs) presented papers that explored the potential of different analyses.
For example
• Amélie Lipp discussed a strategy for her French participants to discuss a SAQ that was outside their experience – Management of the possum population of New Zealand.
• Amélie Lipp discussed the theoretical background exploring the ethical dilemmas.
• Brent Wagner – Space pedagogical encounters and culture from inside a socioscientific issue.
WP4. Developing pedagogical and communicative strategies
Task 4.1 Develop research-informed pedagogical communicative strategies to trial in WP5.
Task 4.2 Develop research questions and research design protocols for trialling these pedagogical communicative strategies within countries and between countries during WP5.
Deliverable
D4.1 Protocols for trialling pedagogical communicative strategies. Month 25
A meeting was held at University College London Institute of Education, 11-15 January 2016. This meeting focussed on the development of pedagogical strategies and ways in which data could be collected from this material. The focus was on each team presenting protocols that were used to develop and enhance pedagogical strategies. The following deliverables were presented in order to critique and further inform a range of pedagogical communicative strategies.
• ER1 - Christodoulou, A., (2016). UK students’ perceptions and awareness of the badger cull controversy.
A discussion about the criteria for analysis of these photo-questionnaires. Critique was that there were only images of the protest against the cull and nothing to illustrate the farmers’ point of view (ie those pro the budger cull).
• ER1- Simonneaux, L. (2016). French students perceptions of the wolf.
She used a framework that involved cognitive/emotional, identified the actants, ethical position – worldview, degree of engagement, and emotion using Platin’s axes.
• ER2-Birdsall, S. & ER1 - France, B. (2016). New Zealand’s students’ perceptions of landscapes and possums.
The detailed analysis of 230 photoquestionaires will be summarised to provide a story that can be linked to prior knowledge, perceptions of risk.
Pedagogical strategies were proposed, tested and reported on.
Levinson, R., Davies, P. (2016). Using Econetworks to analyse pre-service teachers' and post-16 students’ views of the badger-cattle TB controversy
This pedagogy was tested with the group as well as data from a participant group of teachers provided for analysis. Pictures were provided to build a photostory about the controversy of the badger cull and the link to TB. Noted that the justifications of decisions most valuable. It is important to identify students’ prior knowledge, questions asked, developing awareness of complexity of the issue. Discussed practicalities of the strategy.
France, B. Birdsall, B., Garthwaite, K., Gormley, K., Wagner, B. (2016). Identifying and trialling pedagogical communicative strategies.
Identified a range of data collection phases in this presentation. For example questions asked of scientists, people in authority; analysis of communicative boards in terms of Actor-Network Theory.
Visiting scholar – Dr Jerome Ravetz. The Post Normal Science of Bads. This presentation gave the group enough time to discuss the perception of risk when associated with PNS. The core of PNS is an existence theory – there exists a class of scientific problems for which there is no textbook answer. We discussed the techno-scientific problems that fall into this category. Links were made with the CASSIS group and Professors Laurence and Jean Simonneaux have invited him to visit ENFA.

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