Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

FP7

MARISA Report Summary

Project ID: 605318
Funded under: FP7-EURATOM-FISSION
Country: Belgium

Final Report Summary - MARISA (MyrrhA Research Infrastructure Support Action)

Executive Summary:
1. Executive Summary
MARISA lays foundations for MYRRHA
The main objective of the MARISA (MYRRHA Research Infrastructure Support Action) project is to bring the MYRRHA facility to the point where construction can commence. MYRRHA (Multi-Purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-Tech Applications) is a first-of-a-kind, large-scale nuclear research reactor designed to operate as an accelerator driven sub-critical system and as a critical liquid metal cooled reactor. MYRRHA has been chosen by the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) as a high priority. In the framework of the European Sustainable Nuclear Industrial Initiative (ESNII), a R&D platform aiming to demonstrate Generation-IV Fast Neutron Reactor technologies, MYRRHA has been identified as a major facility contributing to the EU’s Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SETplan).

Transitional project
The MARISA project marks the transition from the project preparatory phase to the construction phase for MYRRHA. The main objective of the MARISA project is to establish the fundamental conditions to bring MYRRHA to the level of development required to start construction work in 2019: an exceptional challenge, both in terms of engineering and project management.

MARISA has developed instruments to coordinate and to manage the MYRRHA project. Furthermore, the MARISA project has supported the creation of the MYRRHA consortium, pooling the expertise required for the deployment of lead-cooled fast reactor systems including the integration of different national and international research initiatives, the preparation of the MYRRHA licensing process, and the coordination of supporting R&D and technical work.

The MARISA project is coordinated by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN and the consortium involves 15 European organisations including universities, research institutes and industrial corporations. Most consortium members have been involved previously in major projects concerning the development of the Generation-IV Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) and Accelerator Driven System (ADS) technology.

Project Context and Objectives:
2. Summary description of the MARISA project context and the main objectives

2.1 The MYRRHA Project
MYRRHA (Multi-Purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-Tech Applications) is a first-of-a-kind, large-scale nuclear research reactor designed to operate as an accelerator driven sub-critical system and as a critical liquid metal cooled reactor. MYRRHA facility has been chosen by the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) as a high priority research infrastructure. In the framework of the European Sustainable Nuclear Industrial Initiative (ESNII), MYRRHA has been identified as a major facility contributing to the European Union’s Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SETplan). ESNII is an industry-led programme providing a platform for research and development aiming at the demonstration of Generation-IV Fast Neutron Reactor technologies.

In the current stage of development, MYRRHA is in the pre-construction phase. At this stage, main emphasis is on the development of the MYRRHA conceptual and basic engineering design, the establishing of the MYRRHA consortium, the execution of supporting R&D, and the preparation of the licensing process. It is planned to construct the MYRRHA facility on the site of the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK•CEN in Mol, Belgium.

2.2 MARISA lays foundations for MYRRHA
The main objective of the MARISA (MYRRHA Research Infrastructure Support Action) project is to bring the MYRRHA facility to the point where construction can commence.

The MARISA project will mark the transition from the project preparatory phase to the construction phase for MYRRHA. The main objective of the MARISA project is to establish the fundamental conditions to bring MYRRHA to the level of development required to start construction work in 2019: an exceptional challenge, both in terms of engineering and project management.

MARISA has developed instruments to coordinate and to manage the MYRRHA project. Furthermore, the MARISA project achieved further progress with respect to the creation of the MYRRHA consortium, the pooling of the expertise required for the deployment of lead-cooled fast reactor systems including the integration of different national and international research initiatives, the preparation of the MYRRHA licensing process, and the coordination of supporting R&D and technical work.

The MARISA project is coordinated by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN and the consortium involves 15 European organisations including universities, research institutes and industrial corporations. Most consortium members have been involved previously in major projects concerning the development of the Generation-IV Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) and Accelerator Driven System (ADS) technology.

2.3 MARISA main objectives
By establishing the appropriate instruments for the management of the project, the creation of the consortium, the initiation of the licensing process and the coordination and review of the engineering programme MARISA will provide the basic conditions for advancing the MYRRHA project to the implementation phase. The MARISA project includes six technical work packages, each with specific objectives.

One of the Work Packages of the MARISA project aimed to realise the essential steps for the establishment of the MYRRHA consortium. To reach this goal, the MARISA project examined different national and international research programmes and initiatives where MYRRHA can play a central role, for example in R&D and technology development for the deployment of lead-cooled fast reactor systems. Furthermore, a plan for integrating different national and international research initiatives was developed. On this basis, the position and the role of MYRRHA in a broader European and international context was defined. Also, a strategic roadmap for the realisation of the MYRRHA Consortium was established and the conditions of access to MYRRHA for different groups of users were defined.

A specific technical work package of the MARISA project aimed to establishing a legal and organisational framework for the MYRRHA project organisation including the definition of rules for the valuation of contributions from consortium members.
A supplementary objective of the MARISA project was to develop state-of-the-art principles, procedures and instruments for the management of the MYRRHA project. These management instruments pertain to the control of project costs, schedule management, human resources, information flows and intellectual property rights.

One of the key objectives of MARISA was to achieve further progress in the license application process for the MYRRHA facility. As part of this objective, MARISA addressed various aspects relating to the MYRRHA licensing process, including the Environmental Impact Assessment Report.

Finally, MARISA aimed to consolidate technical work relating to the MYRRHA accelerator, MYRRHA primary system and the MYRRHA Balance of Plant. To reach this objective, the MARISA project included a dedicated work package considering the following topics: (1) external review of the MYRRHA primary system to provide an additional validation step prior to passing to the construction phase; (2) coordination of work relating to the MYRRHA accelerator and (3) external review of the MYRRHA auxiliary systems (““Balance of Plant”).

Project Results:
3. Main Scientific & Technical Results and Foregrounds

3.1 MARISA Strategic Planning
3.1.1. MARISA Strategic Planning - Scope and Objectives
MARISA addressed a number of strategic issues in connection with the deployment of MYRRHA. One of the objectives of the MARISA project was to contribute to the establishing of the MYRRHA Consortium and the MYRRHA Users’ Group. As part of this assignment, the MARISA project examined different national and international research programmes and initiatives where MYRRHA can play a key role, for example in R&D and technology development for the deployment of lead-cooled fast reactor systems. On this basis, the position and the future role of MYRRHA in this domain was analysed and outlined. Furthermore, a strategic roadmap for the realisation of the MYRRHA Consortium was established and the conditions of access to MYRRHA for different groups of users were defined.

As a result of work performed under MARISA Work Package 2 (Strategic Planning), the following main achievements are reported:
• A roadmap defining the contribution of MYRRHA as a fast neutron spectrum research facility to the closing of the nuclear fuel cycle was established;
• A document describing the integration and the pooling of national research initiatives was delivered;
• A strategic roadmap for the establishing of the MYRRHA International Consortium was elaborated;
• A document positioning MYRRHA as an international ‘Open User Facility’ was drafted. This document defines and discusses potential modes and conditions of access to the MYRRHA research facility.

The next sections discuss the detailed achievements of MARISA’s Work Package on strategic planning.
3.1.2 Detailed description of achievements made
3.1.2.1 Roadmap defining the contribution of MYRRHA as a fast neutron spectrum research facility to the closing of the nuclear fuel cycle
Radioactive waste generated by nuclear fission and spent nuclear fuel contains minor actinides such as neptunium, americium and curium. Although present in relatively small quantities, minor actinides are the major source of decay heat, radiotoxicity and neutrons. In conventional reprocessing techniques of spent nuclear fuel, minor actinides are extracted - together with other radionuclides - from the spent nuclear fuel and transferred to waste streams that are conditioned in a matrix of glass, cement, ceramic or other stable media. Most national waste management programmes foresee interim-storage of the reprocessed and conditioned radioactive waste and spent fuel prior to final disposal in deep geological formations.

Advanced nuclear fuel cycles consider the re-use of plutonium and the reduction of minor actinides in the waste streams. In “Partitioning and Transmutation” (P&T), minor actinides are separated (partitioned) from the radioactive waste stream and are subject to a strong neutron flux in fast spectrum reactors. Transmutation is the process where minor actinides are irradiated in an intense neutron radiation field in high power nuclear fission facilities such as critical fast neutron reactors or subcritical accelerator-driven systems (ADS). In this process, minor actinides are converted into short-lived radionuclides thus reducing the level of radiotoxicity. Partitioning & Transmutation is thus part of a broader strategy regarding the closing of the nuclear fuel cycle and is therefore highly relevant to programmes and policies on the long-term management of long-lived and high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

As a European Fast Spectrum Facility and accelerator-driven system, MYRRHA has the potential to deliver a fundamental contribution with respect to the demonstration of the concept of the transmutation of minor actinides. In the framework of the MARISA project, advanced fuel cycles and waste management approaches considered in EU Member States and worldwide were reviewed. This assessment was used as a point of departure for identifying the role and the contribution of MYRRHA to research and the further development of transmutation in view of industrial deployment.

A second important field of application of the MYRRHA facility lies in the domain of research related to the testing and the qualification of innovative fuels and materials for the future fast reactor concepts and for programmes on nuclear fusion. The development of materials and fuels can only be performed in an irradiation facility where fully controlled and representative experimental conditions can be obtained. Hence, a flexible irradiation facility as MYRRHA has the potential of providing substantial contributions in this domain with particular emphasis on the development on technologies relating to the lead fast reactor.

The contribution of MYRRHA to studies relating to fundamental physics was identified as a third area of common international interest.

3.1.2.2 Plans to integrate different national research initiatives
Work Package 2 of the MARISA project has been designed to optimise and to maximise the future contribution of MYRRHA to research, development and the demonstration of technologies relating to the Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS). In view of this objective, an inventory of national and international research initiatives and requirements in relation to the research capabilities that will be offered by MYRRHA as ADS technology has been made. This enabled to define the position the MYRRHA project with respect to different national and international research programmes in different domains of common interest. More specifically, the role of the contribution of MYRRHA in the following strategic areas was investigated:
• MYRRHA as a demonstrator of the Accelerator-driven system concept;
• The role of MYRRHA in the demonstration of the feasibility of the transmutation of long-lived actinides as part of the long-term management of radioactive waste;
• The contribution of MYRRHA in support of the development of the Lead Fast Reactor (LFR);
• The contribution of MYRRHA to research relating to fundamental physics.

The MARISA project confirmed the fundamental role of the MYRRHA fast spectrum neutron facility in these strategic research areas. Furthermore, it was acknowledged that the integration of existing and future national and international research programmes alongside the MYRRHA infrastructure is beneficial in terms of effectiveness and the usage of resources and is fundamental for the advancement in concerned research areas.

3.1.2.3 Establishing of the MYRRHA International Consortium
MYRRHA is an innovative fast spectrum neutron irradiation facility, which is highly relevant to the European and the international community. According to current plans, it is envisaged that the Belgian Federal State will act as the major contributor to MYRRHA while other interested parties are invited to participate in the MYRRHA project through agreements that are to be concluded at the level of the State.

In the MARISA project, a strategic roadmap was developed in support of the establishing the MYRRHA consortium. As a starting point, potential members of the Consortium were identified. On this basis, four scenarios for the establishing of the MYRRHA Consortium were defined and assessed. A detailed SWOT analysis of the four scenarios was drawn up based on predefined evaluation criteria and taking into account boundary conditions such as potential limitations imposed by the legal framework of the MYRRHA Consortium. Finally, a roadmap, a timeline and resultant actions that are required for the stepwise realisation of the MYRRHA Consortium were established.

3.1.2.4 MYRRHA as an international ‘Open User Facility’
The MYRRHA facility is planned to be operated as an international “Open Users’ Facility”, providing access to a broad spectrum of users ranging from the research community at large to users with an industrial or commercial background.

The MARISA project has analysed the different groups of potential users of the MYRRHA facility and has defined different modes of access to the MYRRHA facility. As a starting point, the conditions for access as “Open Users’ Facility” of different facilities worldwide were reviewed. Thereby, guidelines and recommendations issued by the European Commission as well as examples from other facilities such as ESS-ERIC, IIL and the Stanford facilities were used as a benchmark. Finally, the terms for access to MYRRHA as an “Open Users’ Facility” were defined and were documented.

3.2. MARISA – Advancements made on MYRRHA legal framework
3.2.1. MARISA – MYRRHA Legal Framework: Scope and Objectives
MARISA’s Work Package 3 is dedicated to MYRRHA Consortium legal aspects.
The partners involved in the MARISA project used their long experience in the development of large nuclear infrastructures to the service of the MYRRHA project, building on existing mechanisms and suitable structures, and enriching the possible models with their knowledge of the MYRRHA specificities and requirements. Within the WP3, the partners defined a suitable legal framework for the MYRRHA undertaking. This has enabled the definition of tailored management and governing mechanisms relevant to the future MYRRHA consortium. This essential work has then permitted to develop complementary key-agreements for the MYRRHA undertaking, such as inter-governmental agreements outlining participation in MYRRHA, rules for in-kind contribution and Intellectual Property Rights management document.
The following results have been achieved:
• The legal structure(s) for the MYRRHA consortium was identified;
• A draft document for Intergovernmental agreements was written;
• The “Article” of Association” for the MYRRHA Consortium were drawn up;
• The governing rules and management structure were documented;
• The rules and procedures for in-kind contribution were outlined;
• A strategic document for provisions of Intellectual Property Rights management of the MYRRHA project was written.

3.2.2. Detailed description of achievements made regarding the MYRRHA legal framework
A project as MYRRHA requires a rigorous legal and organisational framework, not only because of the complexity of its scientific and technical dimension but also considering the diversity of actors, countries, organisations, who will participate in and benefit from MYRRHA. This demands an appropriate implementation of the MYRRHA project, with a sound basis of governance and management, enabling each partner of the MYRRHA consortium to be fully aware of the rules and thus confident in taking part in MYRRHA. An appropriate legal and organisational framework is a prerequisite for attracting potential new stakeholders and investors. In a dedicated Work Package, MARISA has addressed legal and organisational aspects relating to MYRRHA.
MYRRHA has been created as an infrastructure of broad international interest and importance. Accordingly, it is envisaged to implement MYRRHA as an international infrastructure with participation of the scientific and technical community worldwide. Participation in the MYRRHA project will be realised through the participation of interested parties at the level of the State. Within this context, MARISA has elaborated on a model of an intergovernmental agreement for the realisation of MYRRHA. Successive steps that must be made for establishing an international consortium were identified. On this basis a model for intergovernmental agreement for the construction and the operation of MYRRHA was drawn up.
In the framework of MARISA, an adequate legal structure for the setting-up, the construction, the operation and the decommissioning of the MYRRHA facility was identified. Different possible legal structures were analysed and their relevance and applicability to MYRRHA was assessed. Various important aspects such as the applicable rules concerning nuclear liability and contractual liability of the MYRRHA consortium and its members were analysed in great detail. On this basis, it was recommended to adopt the “Association Internationale Sans But Lucratif (AISBL)” as the legal basis for MYRRHA. The European legal structure of the “European Research Infrastructure Consortium” (E.R.I.C.) is not authorised for infrastructures falling under the EURATOM Treaty and being qualified as predominantly nuclear such as a nuclear research reactor. The Association Internationale Sans But Lucratif (AISBL) is a non-profit association based on Belgian law, with an explicit international purpose. VAT, excise rights, and taxes in general will require an additional in-depth assessment and their terms and conditions must be negotiated with the Belgian authorities. An E.R.I.C. legal structure would have been more advantageous for those aspects.
MARISA has elaborated on the definition of adequate organisational structure for MYRRHA, detailing the role and responsibilities of each governing body of the MYRRHA undertaking (including governing, advisory and steering bodies) and taking into account the specificities of the successive phases of the MYRRHA facility life-cycle (setting-up, construction, operation and decommissioning phases).

Members of the MYRRHA Consortium can take part to MYRRHA in-cash or in-kind contributions or a combination of both. MARISA has defined and outlined the essential parameters and common standards that will be used to reach in-kind contribution agreements with the Consortium partners. In the framework of MARISA, a template agreement for in-kind contributions has been drawn up. Thereby, the allocation of responsibilities, whether technical or financial, were defined, the procedures to be applied for evaluating and coordinating the in-kind contributions of the partners and the resolution of disputes, if appropriate.

MARISA has defined the general principles as well as detailed rules for the management of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) within the MYRRHA international consortium. An IPR policy will be set out, covering several different aspects, such as exchange of knowledge (background and foreground/results); confidentiality; IP protection and dissemination; Inventions by (seconded) employees; and exploitation of (jointly owned) intellectual property.

3.3. MYRRHA Consortium Management
3.3.1. MYRRHA Consortium Management - Scope and Objectives
Besides scientific, technical and economic challenges, the construction of innovative nuclear research infrastructures such as MYRRHA is particularly demanding in terms of project management. Accordingly, adequate instruments must be developed and implemented in support of the definition and the control of diverse activities during the pre-construction as well as during the construction phase.
During the pre-construction phase, main focus is on work relating to the completion of the engineering design, the execution of the supporting R&D programme, the preparation of license application files and the establishing of the Owners’ Consortium and the corroborating of a financing scheme and legal structure. These activities are diverse, are carried out concurrently and must therefore be planned and executed consistently in view of achieving predefined project milestones and deliverables as well as scientific and technical excellence in agreement with the project budget and schedule.
During the construction phase, a great variety of activities will take place on-site with involvement of a multitude of contractors, subcontractors representing different backgrounds, technical disciplines and roles. These activities must be adequately organised, managed and controlled within the constraints of the project’s budget and schedule. In order to meet these challenges, advanced project management procedures and instruments must be defined and deployed taking into account the constraints and the specifics of the MYRRHA project.
The main purpose of MARISA’s Work Package 4 was to define and to implement methods and instruments for the management of the MYRRHA project. To this end, the MARISA project developed and deployed advanced project management instruments taking into account the constraints and the specific features of the MYRRHA project.

3.3.2 Detailed description of achievements made on the MYRRHA Consortium management
3.3.2.1 Development of the MYRRHA Project Manual
In the framework of the MARISA project, a MYRRHA Project Manual was developed. The MYRRHA Project Manual is a compendium management procedures/processes required for the execution of the MYRRHA project. The MYRRHA Project Manual provides a formal framework for the effective implementation and accomplishment of all activities that are conducted as part of the MYRRHA project. Accordingly, the MYRRHA Project Manual describes all management activities related to the MYRRHA project in order to ensure that:
• The MYRRHA project objectives are achieved in the most efficient and effective way on the basis established procedures that are collectively supported and shared by staff working on the MYRRHA project;
• The MYRRHA project is realised in compliance with relevant regulatory requirements and according to appropriate quality and safety standards and regulatory requirements;
• Work performed in the framework of the MYRRHA project is sufficiently documented, thus providing a basis for the assessment of the performance of the project based on internal and external project reviews or audits, if applicable.

The MYRRHA Project Manual constitutes a common basis for bringing MYRRHA to a level of development required to enable the construction work to start. In the framework of the Coordination and Support Action MARISA, state-of-the-art management principles, procedures and instruments were developed and implemented in support of the supervision of progress towards the MYRRHA Milestones & Deliverables, the control of cost, the supervision of the MYRRHA schedule, the management of human resources and the administering of project-related information.

3.3.2.2 Implementation of MYRRHA project management instruments
The MARISA project has developed and implemented management instruments that are required in order to bring the MYRRHA project to a level of maturity needed to start construction work. More specifically, the following objectives were realised:
• A MYRRHA project Work Breakdown structure was drawn up. This Work Break-down constitutes a basis for planning and scheduling, budgeting and project control and progress monitoring;
• A high-level master project schedule and baseline planning for the construction phase of the MYRRHA facility was developed for Phase 1 of MYRRHA Implementation Scenario 1 (i.e. the construction of the 100 MeV accelerator);
• A project budget baseline was developed for financial planning, monitoring and control during the construction phase of the MYRRHA facility;
• A common platform for the management of information and documentation to be used during the pre-construction and the construction phase of the MYRRHA facility was established. This platform supports the controlled dissemination of information and the documenting is of prime importance:
o to ensure effective communication between different staff and contractors working on the MYRRHA project;
o to establish a reference knowledge base providing access to all project related information including – amongst others - scientific, technical and engineering information; documentation related to the MYRRHA licensing process and dossier, MYRRHA management documentation, and MYRRHA project reporting;
o to control access to different types of information, amongst others in view of preventing access to information with restricted distribution (protecting intellectual property rights).
• A “MYRRHA hiring policy and hiring plan” describing the principles and the policies for the hiring of internal staff working on the MYRRHA project was established. The “MYRRHA hiring policy and hiring plan” as drawn up as part of the MARISA project identifies staff requirements as part of MYRRHA Implementation Scenario 1 and contains a recruitment plan for the period 2016-2017.

3.4 MYRRHA Financial aspects
3.4.1 MYRRHA financial aspects - Scope and Objectives
The main purpose of MARISA Work Package 5 is to establish a model for the financing of MYRRHA. Furthermore, Work Package 5 identifies and reviews the major cost categories, the financing and the funding mechanisms during the different MYRRHA project phases (construction, operation and decommissioning phase). Work Package 5 consists of two tasks:
• Task 5.1: Financial arrangements;
• Task 5.2: Financial mechanisms.
The construction of innovative nuclear research infrastructures requires substantial financial resources during different phases of the project. In the framework of MARISA Work Package 5, mechanisms for the financing of the MYRRHA project have been identified and cost specifiers associated with the MYRRHA facility have been outlined. Results obtained as part of MARISA Work Package 5 have been used as an input to the MYRRHA business model. The MYRRHA Financial Model is used during negotiations with potential members of the MYRRHA Consortium and diverse stakeholders. In this sense, works performed as part of MARISA Work Package 5 has substantially contributed in preparing the transition from the pre-construction to the construction phase.

3.4.2 Detailed description of achievements made regarding the MYRRHA Licensing process
3.4.2.1 Financial arrangements
In the framework of Work Package 5.1 of the MARISA project (Seventh Framework Programme, European Commission), SCK•CEN analysed different mechanisms for the financing of innovative research facilities and considered their applicability to MYRRHA. These funding mechanisms were assessed both for the pre-construction phase and the construction phase.
As a point of departure, it was assumed that the cost associated with the pre-construction phase can be estimated in the order approximately 10% of the total cost of construction. The MYRRHA pre-construction cost was then broken down into the following categories: general and legal management, pre-licensing, basic engineering design and supporting Research & Development programme. The main sources of financing of the MYRRHA pre-construction phase were identified and discussed. It is anticipated that the cost of the MYRRHA pre-construction phase will be covered mainly by the Specific Endowment provided by the Belgian Federal Government and by financing through multi-annual Framework Programmes by the European Commission.
During the MYRRHA construction phase, in-cash and in-kind contributions from different Members of the MYRRHA Consortium are identified as the main sources of financing. These contributions are anticipated to be effected at the level of the States taking part in MYRRHA while technical contributions to MYRRHA are delivered by research and technical support organisations at the national level. MARISA deliverable D 5.1 discusses the mechanism of in-kind contributions. Thereby, management aspects relating to in-kind contributions are discussed. Furthermore, MARISA deliverable D 5.1 analyses and discusses complementary financing sources such as the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI), funding through loans provided by the European Investment Bank and financing through public-private partnership.

3.4.2.2 Financial mechanism
MARISA Deliverable D 5.2 (Mechanisms for the funding of MYRRHA) analyses the nature of costs arising during the major phases of the MYRRHA lifecycle. More specifically, capital expenditure and financial resources requirements were broken down in the following a series of major phases of the MYRRHA project lifecycle:
• The pre-construction phase involving the pre-construction engineering and design and the supporting R&D programme as well as preparation of the MYRRHA licensing;
• The MYRRHA construction phase during which the MYRRHA primary system and the
Reactor building, the MYRRHA accelerator and the auxiliary buildings are constructed;
• The MYRRHA commissioning phase;
• The MYRRHA operational/exploitation phase;
• The MYRRHA decommissioning phase.

The report describes for each of the phases the work content and the main cost drivers. Furthermore, the report discusses the cost specifics associated with each of these phases and points out appropriate mechanisms and funding sources applicable to the financing of MYRRHA.

3.5 MYRRHA License Application Process
3.5.1 MYRRHA License application process – Scope and objectives
The process of licensing and building a nuclear research facility is complex and involves different steps and interactions with various stakeholders. The MARISA project has addressed various aspects on the critical path of the MYRRHA licensing process. The objectives of work undertaken in the framework of MARISA regarding the MYRRHA licensing process are:
• to conduct an assessment or review of Environment Impact Assessment Reports from diverse nuclear facilities with the objective to learn from practical experience of comparable cases and to evaluate these cases in terms of applicability to MYRRHA;
• to perform a study and assessment of a scenario where a break of the beam window occurs and to investigates pathways for radionuclide release including mitigation measures;
• to draw up the “MYRRHA Notification File” as a first step in the MYRRHA license application process;
• to draft the “MYRRHA Environmental Impact Assessment report” (EIAR) as part of e MYRRHA license application process.

3.5.2 Detailed description of achievements made regarding the MYRRHA Licensing process
MYRRHA (Multi-Purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-Tech Applications) is a first-of-a-kind nuclear research infrastructure for science and innovation. The MYRRHA project aims to construct a fast neutron spectrum multi-purpose irradiation facility that is conceived as an accelerator-driven system (ADS) that can be operated in sub-critical and critical mode. The MYRRHA facility consists of a proton accelerator which is connected to a lead-bismuth-cooled reactor. The design and the construction of the innovative nuclear research infrastructures such as MYRRHA is particularly challenging since this requires the management of a large number of activities in view of performing technical excellence in compliance with the project budget and schedule.
The Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK•CEN is in charge of the overall design of MYRRHA, which is a first of a kind installation constrained by several requirements of different nature. This innovative nuclear research infrastructure also entails a number of important challenges with regard to the licensing process, which is different from the licensing trajectory pertaining to conventional nuclear power plants or nuclear facilities. Innovative methodologies and tools are requested not only to demonstrate the safety of the MYRRHA facility but also to assess the radiological and non-radiological impact of this multipurpose irradiation facility on its environment. Different scenarios and design options must be assessed and compared to standards and baselines considering - among others - environmental issues. Furthermore, an important aspect of the licensing process involves communication with and consultation of the general public.
The WP6 is related to the licensing process and, in particular, the Environmental Impact Assessment Report, which is a basic and essential step in the MYRRHA licensing process.
In the framework of the MARISA project, the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) licensing process of existing facilities was reviewed and assessed. Examples from large installations (nuclear reactors and accelerators) were studied in view of obtaining a better insight in the work expected to be done for the MYRRHA programme. Results from this assessment confirmed that the European Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency play a fundamental role in identifying and defining guidelines, standards and fundamental safety issues. Guidance given by these international organisations has been particularly instrumental in defining the MYRRHA licensing process.
MYRRHA is a fast neutron spectrum multi-purpose irradiation facility that is conceived as an accelerator-driven system (ADS) that can be operated in sub-critical and critical mode. The MYRRHA facility consists of a proton accelerator that is connected to a lead-bismuth-cooled reactor. The coupling of a fast reactor to a proton accelerator implies that safety studies must consider accidental scenarios involving accelerator coupling incidents. In these scenarios, the incident of a beam window failure has been put forward as a case study that was analysed as part of the MARISA project. In case of beam window failure, preventive arrangements must be made to avoid or to mitigate consequences in terms of environmental impact, as significant radioactive releases to the environment might occur via the beam line. Appropriate diverse and redundant barriers to prevent such scenario have to be foreseen and their safety function has been demonstrated. For the proposed double-window system under study within this task, this has been achieved through design development and laboratory testing, leading to the selection of appropriate reference material (Niobium) and foil thickness (10 μm).
Finally, a “Project Note” has been drafted in the framework of the MARISA project. On this basis, a draft detailed table of content for the Environmental Impact Assessment Report could be drawn up. This was effected for MYRRHA as a full installation, providing the supporting information and justification where appropriate. This Project Note also contains was further elaborated for the first phase in the construction of MYRRHA programme as defined in the updated MYRRHA roadmap, more specifically for the construction of the 100 MeV accelerator section and its proton target facility. According to the present schedule, this infrastructure is now planned to be ready by 2024.

3.6 MYRRHA Technical Coordination and Integration
3.6.1 MYRRHA technical coordination & integration - Scope and Objectives
MARISA’s Work Package 7 had as a main objective to ensure the technical coordination of work associated with the design of the MYRRHA Primary system, the MYRRHA Accelerator and the MYRRHA “Balance of Plant”. Work associated with these three topical areas was addressed in three Work Packages. The main achievements are discussed in section 3.6.2.
3.6.2 Detailed description of achievements made regarding MYRRHA technical coordination & integration

3.6.2.1 Review of the MYRRHA Primary System
The mechanical, thermo-mechanical and thermo-hydraulic design of the primary system of MYRRHA has been conducted by the SCK•CEN design team without feedback from external parties. To guarantee success and to maximize the credibility of the proposed solutions, an external review and integration of past experience on fast reactors is indispensable. In the framework of the MARISA project, the primary design activities were reviewed thereby integrating the relevant past experiences.
Work accomplished by the MARISA project involved four studies, which are described here in greater detail:
• Fuel Assembly tolerances: based on the review of a preliminary concept and the experience feedback of existing fuel assembly designs used in Phenix and SuperPhenix, the dimensions of some key components such as the wire and the tolerances were optimized. The study resulted into a drawing set which is manufacturable and which fulfils the thermo-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical requirements of the assembly.
• Fuel specifications and justifications: existing specifications from fast reactor fuel were provided as input for design criteria for the MYRRHA fuel. Only one subset is considered as relevant due to the different operational conditions between the sodium reactors and MYRRHA. On the other hand, the justification of some criteria cannot be extrapolated to a LBE-system. Because of the limitations of the existing knowledge base, new activities should be defined specific for a LBE system and cannot be resolved in this framework.
• Comparison between sodium pool and loop reactor concepts: initiated by an exploratory design optimization of the primary system, several design options were investigated in terms of their contribution to a reduction in the dimensions of MYRRHA and safety implication due to the design. One promising reactor concept is a loop-type option. This option was compared to the current pool-type configuration. Because several fast reactors such as Rapsodie, JOYO, BOR-60, SNR-300, PFBR, MONJU, BN-350, are indeed of the loop-type the experience feedback of both systems is requested. A comparative study was performed with focus on design, safety, operability, in-service inspection and repair, economics.
• Experience feedback about the use of inert gas in sodium fast reactors: to review and to improve the MYRRHA Primary Cover Gas and Ventilation System (PCGVS), the experience feedback of the inert gas management system of sodium fast reactors has been analyzed. This study included the functional specification, the system architecture, possible options, constraints and recommendations implementing similar systems.
In addition to work described above, the MARISA project captured the “Return of Experience” from nuclear infrastructures that have been built in France.

3.6.2.2 Coordination and efficient integration work relating to the development of the MYRRHA accelerator
One of the goals of the MARISA project was to integrate efficiently accelerator R&D activities by proposing an organisational scheme for the Initial MYRRHA Accelerator Consortium (IMAC). IMAC starts its activities along the design of the front end of the MYRRHA linac, the Low Energy Beam Transport Line (LEBT). The LEBT was designed and constructed in order to build know-how for intense hadron beams, to address technological issues and to study beam physics to improve injector reliability. The line was fully assembled in 2015 and was operational for beam measurements. The LEBT was qualified proving that specifications were met. This line is operated to address space charge compensation of intense proton beams: the specifications of the beam (emittance) are measured with a controlled injection of gas in the line. Experimental evidence of the influence of gas species and pressure on beam dynamics and space charge compensation were measured. Detailed modelling of the beam dynamics and optimal conditions of beam transport are presently under study.
To maximize the reliability of the Radiofrequent (RF) system, the engineering design of solid-state amplifiers for the radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) was fully worked out (176 MHz, 160 kW). An alternative modelling of the MYRRHA RFQ using the method of moments helps improve the understanding of the accelerator.
The IMAC organisational structure was investigated to provide an organisational basis for the construction of the MYRRHA accelerator. The current organisation is looked into through the LEBT collaboration. A state-of-the-art of the comparable accelerator projects ESS, SNS and SPIRAL2 is worked out in terms of organisation, human resources, budget and timeline. For each project, an analysis provides feedback for the construction phase of the MYRRHA linac. A PBS structure of the 100 MeV accelerator was worked out as the basis for accelerator lot definition.

3.6.2.3 Coordination of the MYRRHA Balance of Plant
In March 2010 the Belgian Government decided to support and finance the development of MYRRHA. From that moment on the MYRRHA project turned from a science primary system project to a project ultimately to be built.
For this purpose, the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK•CEN established a dedicated group of experts was defined as ‘Balance of Plant’. For all disciplines in the early stages of engineering an expert was hired (process, piping, electrical, buildings, HVAC, I&C). The major objective of this group was to integrate the primary system into the complete facility and to prepare a comprehensive Works Description elaborating the work of the future Engineer-consortium. This work is called Front End Engineering & Design or “FEED”.
The FEED has the following 3 major objectives:
• To produce sufficient detail in the design so as to allow assembling an investment estimate ± 25% for the complete project;
• To resolve all major safety and security issues so as to allow the Belgian Safety Authority to make up a positive prelicensibility statement;
• To subdivide the project into a number of lots and prepare the works description for the first lots, allowing the project to enter into tendering, awarding and construction. Each lot can be in EPCM, EPC or other. The intention was to keep the primary system into own hands of the MYRRHA Consortium.

More precisely, typical coordination activities for the Balance of Plant include: project and financial reporting, detailed planning, milestone definition, definition of work breakdown structure, setting up a project quality manual, integration of primary system in the balance of plant.
In addition to the very detailed Project Execution plan for all “System, Structures and Components” (SSC), capture grids were produced documenting the current state of knowledge. Based on this a first set of Functional Specifications were developed for all SSC. Functional Specifications are the narrative documents stating clearly what the covered SSC is supposed to do in all DBC situations: its normal functioning and its contribution to safety based on the Safety Approach.

3.7 MARISA Communication
3.7.1 MARISA communication - Scope and Objectives
The focal point of the MARISA Communication Plan is on the transfer of information generated by the FP7 project MARISA to targeted audiences. These targeted audiences are potential Members of the MYRRHA Owners’ and Users’ Consortium, the European Commission and organisations defining at the European level strategies, priorities, and policies in nuclear research and development. Particular emphasis of the MARISA Communication plan has been on the dissemination of information to the European Sustainable Nuclear Industrial Initiative (ESNII) and the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI).
The MARISA Communication Plan forms part of Work Package 8 and consists of the following tasks and associated objectives:
• The communication & dissemination of results from MARISA at EU level (ESNI, SET-Plan, European Commission, ESFRI, ...)
• The dissemination of information of results from the MARISA project that is directly relevant to the internal organisation and the management of the MYRRHA project towards the Members of the MYRRHA Consortium.

3.7.2 Detailed description of achievements made by MARISA communication
3.7.2.1 Communication and dissemination of information on results from MARISA to Stakeholders
MYRRHA is a cornerstone of the “European Research Area of Experimental Reactors” (ERAER) and is one of the three key research reactors forming part of the Strategic Agenda of the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNETP). MYRRHA was selected as the innovative research infrastructure endorsing one of the most promising nuclear technologies in the framework of the European Sustainable Nuclear Industrial Initiative (ESNII). MYRRHA will take on the role of European Technology Pilot Plant (ETPP) in the roadmap for the development of the lead fast reactor (LFR) technology. As part of Work Package 8.1, information generated by the MARISA project has been brought forward at the European Sustainable Nuclear Industrial Initiative (ESNII) (forming part of the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform) and the EU Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET-Plan) through participation in SETIS (Strategic Energy Technologies Information System).
The European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) qualified MYRRHA as a key research facility and included MYRRHA in 2010 in the ESFRI list of priority research facilities. In 2015, the MYRRHA Management Team drafted and submitted a status update on MYRRHA as part of the MARISA project. Following the assessment of the advancements made by MYRRHA, the position of MYRRHA on the ESFRI priority list was confirmed in 2016.
As part of the MARISA project, progress made by the MYRRHA project has been communicated to the “European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures” (ESFRI). More specifically, information relating to the MARISA project was communicated through the following channels:
• Participation to the Support Action “Communication and Policy development for Research Infrastructures in Europe” (CoPoRi) Workshop on “Best Practices” (Brussels, 4-5 December 2013);
• Drafting and official submission of a status update of MYRRHA for the “ESFRI Roadmap Update” in January 2015;
• Confirmation of the position of MYRRHA on the ESFRI Roadmap and participation to the ESFRI Roadmap 2016 Launch Event (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 10 March 2016).

3.7.2.2 Communication and dissemination of information on results from MARISA to Members of the MYRRHA Consortium
Achievements from the MARISA project such as the definition of the conditions of access, the elaboration of methods and instruments for the management of the MYRRHA project during the construction phase, the identification of research areas of mutual interest to potential Users’ Groups, the elaboration of the legal entity for the MYRRHA project, the definition of the framework for participation through in-cash and in-kind contributions and the coordination of scientific and technical work are of prime importance to future members of the MYRRHA Consortium. MARISA Work Package 8.2 has been established in support of the dissemination of results from MARISA to potential Members of the MYRRHA Consortium and the MYRRHA User’s Group. The following main achievements are reported as part of the MARISA communication plan:
• At the end of term of Contract of the MARISA project, no formal commitments for membership to the MYRRHA Consortium were acquired from potential candidate participant States. Therefore, specific actions regarding the communication of results from the MARISA project towards Members of the MYRRHA Consortium could not be put into effect as envisaged in the MARISA Description of Work. Alternatively, results from work performed by MARISA relating to, among others, conditions for participation, the valuation of partner contributions, legal and management aspects and others were not discussed in the framework of an existing consortium but were conveyed as part of the negotiation process with candidate States for participating in MYRRHA.
• The MYRRHA project has been conceived as international Open Users’ Facility. The establishing of the MYRRHA Users’ Group is a fundamental to the MYRRHA project. In the framework of the MARISA project, a Summer School on heavy liquid metal applied research was organised at SCK•CEN Mol. During the term of Contract of the MARISA project, two editions of the “MYRRHA Heavy Metal Summer School” took place, respectively from 15 to 19 June 2015 and from 13 to 17 June 2016. The Heavy Liquid Metals Summer School formed part of the MARISA communication plan under Work Package 8.2. The Summer School addressed potential future interest groups and users of the MYRRHA facility as well as delegates from organisations of future potential Members of the MYRRHA Consortium. The 2015 and 2016 editions of the MYRRHA Summer School covered various aspects of HLM technology that are essential for the engineering design and safety of nuclear systems. Lectures were given by experts from SCK•CEN and other internationally renowned research organisations. Various topical subjects such as the chemical, thermal hydraulic and materials issues and challenges in instrumentation and design were addressed. Complementary to the lectures, technical visits were organised to various experimental facilities that were constructed at SCK•CEN in support of the MYRRHA project. On the last day of the course week, participants had the opportunity to brainstorm in interactive sessions on best practices and selections of technologies for HLM cooled nuclear systems. The MYRRHA Summer Schools were instrumental in the establishing of an international network of potential users of the MYRRHA facility as well as for paving the way for active involvement in MYRRHA.

Potential Impact:
4 Potential impact including socio-economic impact and dissemination activities

4.1 The MYRRHA project – The broader socio-economic dimension
MYRRHA or the “Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications” is a first-of-a-kind, innovative nuclear research reactor operating as an accelerator driven system (ADS). The MYRRHA infrastructure consists of a proton accelerator of 600 MeV, a spallation target and a multiplying core with Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, cooled by liquid lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi). It is planned to construct the MYRRHA facility at the site of the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK•CEN in Mol, Belgium.

MYRRHA is conceived as the world’s first research facility that will allow for the demonstration of the concept of the MYRRHA accelerator driven system (ADS). MYRRHA will be the only fast spectrum irradiation facility in Europe, thus strengthening the European research area.

The MARISA project has advanced the development of MYRRHA. MYRRHA is a significant research infrastructure for flexible irradiations in the fast neutron spectrum. A wide range of work could be undertaken at MYRRHA extending from research in fundamental physics to the production of materials for renewable energy applications and nuclear medicine. The catalogue of applications of MYRRHA includes topical areas that are highly important in terms of socio-economic and societal relevance:
• MYRRHA will play a key role in studies investigating the conversion of long-lived radionuclides to radio-isotopes with shorter half-lives: a process called transmutation that has the potential to reduce the radiotoxicity of high-level radioactive waste and decreasing the critical period for geological disposal;
• MYRRHA will be able to offer testing conditions that are appropriate for development of nuclear fusion technology.
• Irradiation experiments will provide a basis for the development, testing and the qualification of materials and components for future, safer nuclear systems that generate less radioactive waste. MYRRHA will support demonstration programmes relating to GEN IV Lead Fast Reactor technology. As a critical lead-alloy based reactor, MYRRHA has the potential to contribute significantly to the development of sustainable nuclear fission systems as part of the transition to a low-carbon energy mix to mitigate climate change;
• A small fraction of MYRRHA’s proton beam will be redirected towards experimental devices for fundamental research on radioactive ion beam applications in areas such as nuclear and atomic physics, nuclear medicine and solid state physics.
• The facility will produce medical isotopes and will also be employed for applied life sciences including the development of new types of radioisotopes for medical applications.

MYRRHA was selected as one of the most promising nuclear technologies in the framework of the European Sustainable Nuclear Industrial Initiative (ESNII). MYRRHA will take on the role of European Technology Pilot Plant (ETPP) in the roadmap for the development of the lead fast reactor (LFR) technology. Furthermore, the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) qualified MYRRHA as a key research facility and included MYRRHA in 2010 in the ESFRI list of priority research facilities. MYRRHA is a cornerstone of the “European Research Area of Experimental Reactors” (ERAER) and is one of the three key research reactors forming part of the Strategic Agenda of the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNETP).

4.2 The MARISA project
The MARISA (MYRRHA Research Infrastructure Support Action) project is a coordination and support action plan that was established under the 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission. The main objective of MARISA is to bring MYRRHA to the level of advancement enabling progression from the pre-construction phase to the construction phase.

4.3 Achievements of MARISA and impact
This section discusses the main achievements and the impact of MARISA. The achievements of the different work packages forming part of MARISA are highlighted.
4.4.1 Integration of research and development and pooling of research capacities within Europe
In the framework of work conducted by MARISA, a plan for integrating and pooling of different research initiatives at the national and the international level was developed. The implementation of this plan will enable the efficient use of resources within the European Research Area for high-ranking research in the thematic areas forming part of the MYRRHA catalogue of applications.

Furthermore, the MARISA project has supported the definition and the positioning of MYRRHA as an international ‘Open User Facility’. The positioning of MYRRHA as an “Open Users’ Facility” will strengthen the European Research Area and will entail a catalytic effect on science and innovation.

Finally, MARISA has identified the role of MYRRHA with respect to the demonstration of the transmutation of long-lived radionuclides in view of reducing the level of radiotoxicity of spent nuclear in the framework of the long-term management of radioactive waste. This subject is highly relevant in terms of socio-economic significance: ensuring the future energy supply and delivering a substantial contribution to developing innovative approaches for the long-term management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are both considered as a major challenge.

4.4.2 Definition and deployment of a legal framework for MYRRHA
Innovative projects such as MYRRHA require a solid and consistent legal and organizational framework. The legal and organizational basis must consider the complexity of its scientific and technical dimension, the interests and the role and the responsibilities of diverse stakeholders participating directly or indirectly in MYRRHA. This demands an appropriate implementation of the MYRRHA project, with a sound basis of governance and management, enabling each partner of the MYRRHA consortium to be fully aware of the terms and conditions and thus confident in taking part in MYRRHA. An appropriate legal and organizational framework is a prerequisite for attracting potential new stakeholders and investors. In a dedicated Work Package, MARISA has addressed legal and organizational aspects relating to MYRRHA.

MYRRHA is an infrastructure of broad international interest and importance and it is envisaged to implement MYRRHA as an international infrastructure with participation of the scientific and technical community worldwide. Participation in the MYRRHA project will be realized through the involvement of interested parties at the level of the State. MARISA has elaborated on a model of an intergovernmental agreement for the realization of MYRRHA. Successive steps that must be made for establishing an international consortium were identified.
In the MARISA project, the legal structure for the setting-up, the construction, the operation and the decommissioning of the MYRRHA facility was identified. Different possible legal structures were analyzed in terms of relevance and applicability to MYRRHA. Various important aspects such as the applicable rules concerning nuclear liability and contractual liability of the MYRRHA consortium and the members of the consortium were analyzed in great detail.

MARISA has elaborated on the definition of adequate organizational structure for MYRRHA, detailing the role and responsibilities of each governing body of the MYRRHA undertaking (including governing, advisory and steering bodies) and taking into account the specificities of the successive phases of the MYRRHA facility life-cycle (setting-up, construction, operation and decommissioning phases).

Members of the MYRRHA Consortium can take part to MYRRHA in-cash or in-kind contributions or a combination of both. MARISA has defined and outlined the essential parameters and common standards that will be used to reach in-kind contribution agreements with the Consortium partners. In the framework of MARISA, a template agreement for in-kind contributions has been drawn up. Thereby, the allocation of responsibilities, whether technical or financial, were defined, the procedures to be applied for evaluating and coordinating the in-kind contributions of the partners and the resolution of disputes, if appropriate.

MARISA has defined the general principles as well as detailed rules for the management of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) within the MYRRHA international consortium. An IPR policy will be set out, covering several different aspects, such as exchange of knowledge (background and foreground/results); confidentiality; IP protection and dissemination; Inventions by (seconded) employees; and exploitation of (jointly owned) intellectual property.

Work accomplished in the framework of MARISA on the legal and organizational aspects has contributed to the advancement of the MYRRHA project: its implementation will represent an essential step forward in making the transition from the pre-construction to the construction phase.

4.4.3 Definition and deployment of adequate project management instruments for MYRRHA
In the framework of the FP7 project MARISA, state-of-the-art instruments for project management were defined and implemented. The control and usage of resources cost-effective, have contributed to bringing the MYRRHA project to a higher level of maturity. Accordingly, the MARISA project represent an essential step forward towards the realization of the MYRRHA facility including its applications, which are of broad interest and high socio-economic relevance.

4.4.4 Establishing of the MYRRHA cost and financing model
According to current plans, it is anticipated that the Belgian Federal State will act as a major contributor to MYRRHA while other interested participants are invited to take part in the MYRRHA project by means of agreements that are planned to be concluded at the level of the State. According to this model, scientific and technical contributions to MYRRHA are effected through national scientific and technical organizations under the mandate of the State.

As part of work that was conducted by MARISA, the cost specifications of the MYRRHA facility for different phases of the MYRRHA lifecycle were analyzed. On this basis, potential funding resources were identified. The analyses of the MYRRHA cost specifications and associated sources of funding were elaborated in detail and are used as input to the MYRRHA business model, which serves as a basis for discussion with potential Consortium Members for participating in MYRRHA.

Work performed under MARISA has contributed to the definition of the cost specifications and the major cost drivers during different phases of the MYRRHA project. Furthermore, the main associated mechanisms and potential sources of funding were identified. This information is used for the definition of the detailed MYRRHA financial model and business model, which is a keystone in financial planning. This realization represents an essential step forward with respect to making the transition from the MYRRHA pre-construction to the construction phase and thus the realization of the catalogue of application of MYRRHA, which is highly important in terms of socio-economic relevance and impact.

4.4.5 Contributing to progress in the MYRRHA licensing process
The Environmental Impact Assessment of the MYRRHA facility forms part of the broader MYRRHA licensing process. The licensing of the MYRRHA facility clearly has direct societal implications since it involves a public consultation and involvement step. This implies that the MYRRHA licensing file must be presented in a form comprehensible by the public at large and thus must be approached from a perspective, which is different from purely safety aspects to be demonstrated at the level of the design of a reactor or an accelerator. Public inquiries planned for both the exploitation license and the environmental license are further supporting the role to be played by the public, the municipality or the region.

4.4.6 Increasing confidence in the MYRRHA technical design
Under the MARISA project, work has been undertaken in support of the technical coordination of work associated with the design of the MYRRHA Primary system, the MYRRHA Accelerator and the MYRRHA buildings and auxiliary infrastructures (“Balance of Plant”). Organizations participating in MARISA brought in their expertise for improving and validating technical design options. This external review provides an additional validation step prior to passing on to the construction phase. On this basis, the MYRRHA design was brought to a higher degree of confidence in terms of technical development and cost-effectiveness.

List of Websites:

http://marisa.sckcen.be/

Related information

Reported by

STUDIECENTRUM VOOR KERNENERGIE
Belgium

Subjects

Nuclear Fission
Follow us on: RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube Managed by the EU Publications Office Top