Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

FP7

MESA Report Summary

Project ID: 604857
Funded under: FP7-TRANSPORT
Country: Belgium

Final Report Summary - MESA (MESA - Maritime Europe Strategy Action - FOSTER Waterborne)

Executive Summary:
The Maritime Europe Strategy Action (MESA – FOSTER WATERBORNE) project was conceived to support the activities of the WATERBORNE Technology Platform.
The MESA methodology was structured to foster new market needs, innovative ideas and research gaps through several implementation measures and groups such as:
1. Thematic Technology Groups of highly skilled and innovation-minded industry professionals and scientists, to identify the state-of-the-art and R&D gaps;
2. A Foresight Support Group, to identify long-term market, societal and regulatory needs; and
3. An Integration Group, to translate both the R&D gaps and the foresight needs into the WTB strategy.
4. A dissemination team, to ensure Europe-wide exploitation of the results and information gained throughout the project
The Thematic Technology Groups shared a common methodology and had the following objectives:
• Cluster major research projects relevant to the theme, and assess their relevant results;
• Organise appropriate conferences and workshops, bringing together industrial and research stakeholders;
• Identify gaps and RDI needs;
• Provide recommendations for future RDI;
• Monitor research project developments
• Propose research and innovation Implementation plans;
• Identify success stories in EU funded projects;
• Support the implementation of the research results for market uptake;
The responsibility of Foresight Support Group was to study trends in the Market, Societal, and Regulatory frameworks within the period to 2030. Along with the TTGs, the results of the Foresight Support Group fed into the work of the Integration Group. The Integration Group incorporated the leaders of the TTGs and the partners participating in the other WPs. This acted as an integration body, incorporating the results of the four TTGs and the Foresight Support Group, and supporting the preparation of the key Strategic documents, i.e.: Vision 2030; Updated Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda; Implementation Plan and Innovation Route Map;
Another input to the Integration Group was the Advisory Committee, chaired by CEREMA – chairman of the Mirror group inside the WATERBORNE TP. The Advisory committee was formed of National Administrations and representatives of the EC institutions. This ensured that the early documents received input from Member States and other European bodies formulating policy within the maritime sector.
The key areas for future opportunities have been identified as:
• Smart vessels, fleets and ports
• Automated and autonomous vessels
• Ultra low energy and emissions vessels and systems
• Safe, secure and adaptable passenger vessels for inland, inshore and offshore duties
• Green, efficient and flexible inland-waterway vessels

Project Context and Objectives:
The Maritime Europe Strategy Action (MESA – FOSTER WATERBORNE) project was conceived to support the activities of the WATERBORNE Technology Platform, by contributing to the:
• Definition and optimization of the European maritime research and innovation strategies;
• Improvement of the stakeholders network, the dissemination, the use of research results, thereby
• increasing the visibility of the R&I findings of the waterborne sector;
• Fostering the definition of the maritime R&I transport policies.
Consequently, the project involved the participation of key industrial, research and members of European associations, active in the maritime sector, in order to ensure the widest possible participation within the platform stakeholders by:
(1) Activating the participating associations networks;
(2) Involving the WATERBORNE TP non-participating associations through the well-established “WATERBORNE Method” (based on open workshops/groups/brokerage events/panels/forum);
(3) Participation of key industrial actors in the maritime sector covering the full value chain;
(4) Establishing solid Networks of EU funded projects, via four Thematic Technology Groups, encouraging easier circulation of the deliverables through the Transport Research and Innovation Portal (TRIP).
Under the CA ACMARE project, the WATERBORNE TP [WTB] completed its initial phase and established itself as a key adviser to, and a strategic partner of, the European Commission, for the generation of consensus views relating to maritime research policy. The WTB Research Strategy was developed and published in three key documents: the VISION 2020, the WATERBORNE TP Strategic Research Agenda (WSRA) and the WATERBORNE TP Implementation Route Map (WIRM). As a result of the subsequent project, CA CASMARE, the VISIONS2025, WSRA and WIRM Issue 2011, were published with the aim to provide support to the maritime community in the implementation and delivery of the WATERBORNE TP Research Strategy for and beyond Horizon2020. However in a changing landscape, under the pressure of the economic downturn, MESA was conceived in order to adapt and review the sector’s strategy.
The MESA methodology was structured to foster new market needs, innovative ideas and research gaps through several implementation measures and groups such as:
5. Thematic Technology Groups of highly skilled and innovation-minded industry professionals and scientists, to identify the state-of-the-art and R&D gaps;
6. A Foresight Support Group, to identify long-term market, societal and regulatory needs; and
7. An Integration Group, to translate both the R&D gaps and the foresight needs into the WTB strategy.
8. A dissemination team, to ensure Europe-wide exploitation of the results and information gained throughout the project
The Thematic Technology Groups shared a common methodology and had the following objectives:
• Cluster major research projects relevant to the theme, and assess their relevant results;
• Organise appropriate conferences and workshops, bringing together industrial and research stakeholders;
• Identify gaps and RDI needs;
• Provide recommendations for future RDI;
• Monitor research project developments
• Propose research and innovation Implementation plans;
• Identify success stories in EU funded projects;
• Support the implementation of the research results for market uptake;
The responsibility of Foresight Support Group was to study trends in the Market, Societal, and Regulatory frameworks within the period to 2030. Along with the TTGs, the results of the Foresight Support Group fed into the work of the Integration Group.
The Integration Group incorporated the leaders of the TTGs and the partners participating in the other WPs. This acted as an integration body, incorporating the results of the four TTGs and the Foresight Support Group, and supporting the preparation of the key Strategic documents, i.e.:
• Vision 2030;
• Updated Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda;
• Implementation Plan and Innovation Route Map;
Another input to the Integration Group was the Advisory Committee, chaired by CEREMA – chairman of the Mirror group inside the WATERBORNE TP. The Advisory committee was formed of National Administrations and representatives of the EC institutions. This ensured that the early documents received input from Member States and other European bodies formulating policy within the maritime sector.
The Dissemination Team was responsible for a number of activities, focussed on ensuring European-wide exploitation of the results of the MESA project, and to ensure the project itself benefited from receiving input from European industry, academia, ship operators, policy makers, etc. These activities included:
• The 3rd and 4th European Maritime Research Policy Conferences
• Support of TRA 2014 and 2016
• Development of a new Waterborne TP Website, with a message board facility to receive feedback on the TTG , Foresight and Strategic reports
• The Maritime Brokerage Event [MIBE2015]
• Waterborne Newsletters
• Production of the RDI Success Stories brochure
• Production of the SRIA brochures

The MESA project was implemented in eight Work Packages, i.e.:
• WP1 - Thematic Technology Group 1: Energy Efficiency
• WP2 - Thematic Technology Group 2: Safety
• WP3 - Thematic Technology Group 3: Production
• WP4 - Thematic Technology Group 4: e-Maritime
• WP5 - Market, Societal, Regulatory Trends and Innovation Agenda Conceptual Frame
• WP6 - Integration Group and Strategic Documents Updates
• WP7 - Dissemination, Database, Showcases
• WP8 - Project Management

Project Results:
The major results of the MESA project is the information and knowledge produced as a result of the four Thematic Technology Groups, the Foresight Group and the Integration Groups, in developing the following:
1. Clustered Research Projects and global state-of-the-art [SotA] of each technology theme, i.e. Energy Efficiency; Safety; Production; and e-Maritime;
2. Proposals for R&D Road Maps, in each technology theme;
3. Reports of the Foresight Group, in relation to Market, Societal, and Regulatory Trends to 2030
4. The Strategic documents, i.e.:
• Vision 2030;
• Updated Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda;
• Implementation Plan and Innovation Route Map;
The findings in these comprehensive reports can be summarised as follows:
Energy Efficiency
The State-of-the-Art analysis focussed on seven main areas, i.e.:
1. Ship resistance
2. Ship propulsion
3. Prime mover
4. Auxiliary energy (conversion) (solar, wind (not for propulsion), seaway energy)
5. Other on-board energy consumers
6. Energy Management Systems
7. Ship operations
The main conclusions were:
• During FP5, FP6 and FP7 a large number of energy efficiency related topics were supported. Based on the available information from these projects it is concluded that substantial progress has been achieved in a number of individual areas, e.g. in ship resistance and propulsion, and engine technology. Here, European manufacturers and suppliers are clearly among world market leaders and it can be reasonably concluded that at least part of this success is due to the work performed in European research projects. The developments and resulting products typically address individual solutions, as stand-alone solutions, promise substantial improvements. However, most projects fall short in reaching their full potential as often the integration of all advanced tools and concepts into a holistic energy saving approach is missing.

• This holds in particular for Energy management systems, where considerable work has been undertaken during FP7, and in the early phase of H2020. Meanwhile, a number of commercial solutions have appeared during recent years, however, a number of these cannot be tracked down to earlier developments performed in EU research. Although there is constant improvement in these, a general assessment is however that they all lack generality. Each of them addresses parts of the energy management problem, but there is hardly any complete solution available today.

• The analysis concluded that many individual developments that benefitted from EU research funding have helped to move the state-of-the-art in energy efficiency technologies forward. The improvements achieved have helped to considerably reduce energy consumption for a given transport task or other maritime operation. This leads to the general conclusion that the overall European maritime transport research initiative has been successful.

The major results of the MESA project is the information and knowledge produced as a result of the four Thematic Technology Groups, the Foresight Group and the Integration Groups, in developing the following:
1. Clustered Research Projects and global state-of-the-art [SotA] of each technology theme, i.e. Energy Efficiency; Safety; Production; and e-Maritime;
2. Proposals for R&D Road Maps, in each technology theme;
3. Reports of the Foresight Group, in relation to Market, Societal, and Regulatory Trends to 2030
4. The Strategic documents, i.e.:
• Vision 2030;
• Updated Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda;
• Implementation Plan and Innovation Route Map;

The findings in these comprehensive reports can be summarised as follows:
Energy Efficiency
The State-of-the-Art analysis focussed on seven main areas, i.e.:
1. Ship resistance
2. Ship propulsion
3. Prime mover
4. Auxiliary energy (conversion) (solar, wind (not for propulsion), seaway energy)
5. Other on-board energy consumers
6. Energy Management Systems
7. Ship operations
The main conclusions were:
• During FP5, FP6 and FP7 a large number of energy efficiency related topics were supported. Based on the available information from these projects it is concluded that substantial progress has been achieved in a number of individual areas, e.g. in ship resistance and propulsion, and engine technology. Here, European manufacturers and suppliers are clearly among world market leaders and it can be reasonably concluded that at least part of this success is due to the work performed in European research projects. The developments and resulting products typically address individual solutions, as stand-alone solutions, promise substantial improvements. However, most projects fall short in reaching their full potential as often the integration of all advanced tools and concepts into a holistic energy saving approach is missing.
• This holds in particular for Energy management systems, where considerable work has been undertaken during FP7, and in the early phase of H2020. Meanwhile, a number of commercial solutions have appeared during recent years, however, a number of these cannot be tracked down to earlier developments performed in EU research. Although there is constant improvement in these, a general assessment is however that they all lack generality. Each of them addresses parts of the energy management problem, but there is hardly any complete solution available today.
• The analysis concluded that many individual developments that benefitted from EU research funding have helped to move the state-of-the-art in energy efficiency technologies forward. The improvements achieved have helped to considerably reduce energy consumption for a given transport task or other maritime operation. This leads to the general conclusion that the overall European maritime transport research initiative has been successful.
• Following present trends and up-to-date information in the maritime industry, it is becoming evident that the market for energy efficiency improvement technologies, in particular, is extremely dynamic with new products or solutions available almost every week. At the same time it is similarly evident that for many of these, even a proper proof of concept is missing and must be provided before major market-uptake can be diagnosed. This is particularly important the volatility of the global energy price situation, as with the present low oil, and other fuel prices, a large number of costly energy saving solutions lose their previous competitive edge.
• Today, the motivation for implementing such technologies needs to come mainly from i) a long term perspective, as latest OPEC news forecast rising oil prices again for the next years and ii) the inherent fact that each fuel saving technology implicitly goes along with emission reductions and hence helps to comply with the further increased requirements to control and limit ship borne emissions.
• These considerations lead to the final conclusion that the exercise performed in MESA should be taken up by the industry and continued on a regular basis to ensure that up-to-date information will be available also in the years to come.
The following technology trends were found most relevant for maintaining technological and commercial competitiveness and leadership for the European maritime industry. These are:
• Hydrodynamics, Resistance & Propulsion: Whilst a lot has been achieved particularly during the last decade to improve hull forms and propulsive efficiency, not least due to recent numerical (CFD) developments originating from earlier framework research, further improvements of frictional resistance (mainly on ship hulls) through the use of advanced coatings, air lubrication techniques and boundary layer control methods, all considered in a life-cycle context, are required. In the present operational context this appears to be the most important element to further reduce energy consumption of maritime transportation. In addition, full scale validation of prediction methods, further aspects of operational resistances – including wind and waves – and dedicated developments for advanced propulsors, will form the basis of anticipated future developments.
• Powering: Improved engine design for operation in “off-design” conditions with a special focus on advanced control strategies. Mechanically new and advanced cooling systems and the use of new engine components and materials for improved corrosion, fatigue, fouling and high load performance will be required plus novel concepts for engine room design to work for integrated retro-fit concepts.
• The use of alternative fuels in the context of multi-fuel engines opens a complete new field. While LNG has been widely adopted in Europe as well as international, the next big step will be the adoption of even more alternative fuel concepts to be run in a single engine. This is associated with developments addressing technology as well as logistics with a special focus on life-cycle cost and impact assessment.

• Emissions: Emission reductions, though not strictly in the context of Energy Efficiency or savings, will play an important role in the future. Post treatment technologies, such as 2nd generation scrubbers, will receive more attention; modelling and more technical developments will be required. Here again, life-cycle considerations will play an important role.
• Energy Efficiency governance / EEDI: The presently (IMO) adopted approach to the formulation of the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) will need to be revisited in the future. A number of issues associated with the present formulation, including e.g. the minimum power requirement and conceptual rule driven designs need an adaptation of the design index, especially in view of the overall transport work / performance adding transportation time into the equation.
• Big Data / Ship Analytics: “Big Data” is one of the buzz-words in shipping terminology at the moment. Technological advances (IT) and advanced regulations (e.g. MRV guidelines) allow and require capturing a much larger amount of data relevant for the assessment of Energy Efficiency of a vessel. Whilst it will soon be possible to accumulate a large amount of information on fuel consumption, performance of individual components and the overall energy household of a ship, together with operational and environmental conditions, the processing of such data will remain a challenge. A proper analysis and decision-making support tools will remain the main task for future development.
The analysis revealed that there are a number of technology gaps which can be identified. These can be grouped into three main categories:
1. Individual technology gaps;
2. Lack of integration work;
3. No radically new powering technologies
The first group comprises mainly technologies which have been addressed as a whole and where research results indicated that still gaps exist to either explain phenomena in sufficient detail to exploit the positive effects to the max (an example is the air lubrication technology) or that technologies have been developed but a complete and comprehensive assessment is still missing to assure a shift to a higher technology readiness level and a sound transfer into industrial practice. Safety with respect to the introduction of new powering and fuel technology can serve as an example here.
The second group relates to the apparent lack of fully integrated energy efficiency solutions. While individual elements are already in place a full exploitation through integrated energy management solutions is still lagging behind and it is felt that a considerable additional potential can be unleashed when bringing the elements together in a consistent way. This relates largely to software techniques and the processing of large amounts of information in the context of “Big Data”. All relevant developments which have a wider impact on the global maritime sector so far, appear to be more or less incremental improvements of existing technology. A renunciation of existing “standard technology”, e.g. for the propulsion of ships, has not been addressed in past research in much detail. Such radical ideas constitute the third group of technology gaps found in the analysis.
The need for such type of long term strategic research has to be carefully balanced against more short term research needs, however the introduction of ECAs, the new European MRV rules and other emission related regulations aiming at limiting CO2 and other emissions, call for more stringent solutions. The most recent IMO Greenhouse Gas Study offers a number of different scenarios for the expected growth rates in international shipping. Even the most conservative assumptions indicate that the emission increases from shipping due to the increased traffic cannot be counterweighted by traditional means and the expected improvements which can be achieved by means of evolutionary developments and optimisations seen in the past years. Seen from this perspective it seems to be necessary to look into more radical, zero emission transport solutions for the future too and thus lay the foundations for a truly sustainable seaborne transport system in Europe and worldwide.

Safety
A large number of past research projects were analysed to produce a comprehensive definition of the state of the art of safety technologies in the maritime sector. Information has been grouped under a number of different interest areas, service and vessel types as follows:
1. Goal based regulations, accident reporting, and data reporting
2. System integration for safety and security
3. Survivability of smaller vessels in extreme conditions
4. Collision and grounding
5. Failure mechanisms
6. Safety of operations in sea and inland ports
7. Fire and evacuation
The analysis of past research projects has identified of a number of technological approaches, namely:
• Navigational tools
• Data network and communication systems
• Decision support systems
• Design software
• Knowledge exchange platforms
• Methodology / design concepts / requirements
• Monitoring instrumentation
• Remote vehicles and inspection robots
• Sensors
• Simulation tools
• Stabilising devices

To provide a common understanding of the current status of each of these technologies and the degree to which it has been implemented, the technology readiness level (TRL) of each was assessed. As a general principle, technologies with a TRL of more than 5 (“Component and/or breadboard validation in relevant environment”) were likely to require further funding for the development of demonstrators, whilst those below require further research funding.
Goal based regulations, accident reporting, and data reporting: the technologies available in this area are generally below TRL 5, indicating a need for further research funding. Technologies include:
• New data networks for security and ship monitoring data transmission
• Integrated Safety and Security Management Platform (ISSMP) software
• Decision Support system integrating different model
• Methods to forecast negative effects on the ship due to external forces (e.g. waves)
• Crisis Management systems
System Integration for Safety and Security: most technologies identified in this area are at TRL 6 or higher, suggesting that they are about to be implemented in real contexts.
Survivability of smaller vessels in extreme conditions: technologies identified include:
• Risk models
• Wave modelling
• Methodologies and design concepts aimed at increasing safety during extreme sea conditions or in an emergency.
Collision and Grounding: technologies identified include:
• Motion and acceleration monitoring systems
• Hull stress monitoring systems
• Active operator guidance systems
• Navigation planning aid tool to forecast compressive ICE dynamics and tool to assess the damage resistance related to ICE compression
• Docking aid (with laser meters and rope auto-tensioning) and mooring monitor on-board system
Except for few cases, most of the following are at TRL 5 or below.
• Failure mechanisms: there are a number of clustered projects in this subject area, whose target is that of preventing failures through the adoption of tools and software for assistance during navigation. TRL levels are typically above 5.
• Safety of operations in port: this covers port operating procedures and the associated support systems. TRL levels are typically greater than 5.
• Fire and evacuation: this is a significant area of interest, covering for example:
• Fire emission toxicity tests, methods and tools
• Fire safety engineering methodology
• Fire growth, toxic effects on people and effect on structural integrity simulation tools
• Evacuation of people simulation tools

Production
European industry is facing tough international competition, in particular in shipbuilding and maritime technologies. Despite market distortions by state aid and restrictive trade laws in some regions of the world, the European maritime sector has successfully established itself in high-value added niche markets for complex custom-made ships and has started to explore new opportunities in the emerging “Blue Growth” markets. This success has been achieved by advanced production methods, excellent networks and supply chains (production management) and secured employment and wealth in many maritime regions, as well as in the hinterland. Europe is leading the development of green technologies contributing to de-carbonization, energy efficiency and decreased life cycle cost. However, only competitive production will enable Europe to drive the development and implementation of those technologies in line with the policy goals. Shipyards play a key role in this process - their productivity, ability to integrate stake holders and technologies and quality largely defines the competitiveness of the entire production chain, as well as safety of ships, resource and energy efficiency of the products and the life cycle processes.
The SotA report covered the most important processes in the life cycle of modern ships, with emphasis on the production phase. A detailed bottom-up analysis was conducted in seven Technology Sub-Areas:
• Design tools and their integration;
• Production preparation and management tools;
• Metals and their processing;
• None-metallic structural materials and their processing;
• Materials and processes for corrosion and fouling protection;
• Assembly and outfitting techniques;
• Maintenance, repair, retrofitting and end-of-life.
The main conclusions were:
• A large gap can be observed between the state of production technologies in leading yards and smaller companies. While the description of the state-of-technology is primarily referring to leading yards, the situation in smaller yards is described where appropriate. Technology Readiness Levels achieved are usually given as ranges representing the different state of application across the industry. The analysis has underlined the need of technology transfer and technology adaptation to smaller companies to maximize the impact of research.
• Continuous research and development along strategic lines, rather than isolated projects, is important to achieve a sustainable improvement in competitiveness. RDI on production technologies on European, national and private level have contributed significantly to achieve and maintain the leading position of EU shipyards in high value-added niche markets.
• In an international comparison Europe the leading research and application of maritime production technologies relevant to its products. The efficient cooperation of research entities and industry in projects and implementation makes the European maritime research area (EMRA) unique. However, competing players in the global market tend to invest more in research infrastructure, “basic” maritime research to take up key enabling technologies and international rule development.
The following technology areas have been found of key importance for the competitiveness of the maritime industry and represent focus areas of research and development:
• Design for life cycle methodologies and tools have been developed and applied. This includes tools and processes for improved retrofitting as well as dedicated decision support and assessment tools. A more consistent use of operational data using the potentials of big data management and industry as well as more sophisticated and integrated life cycle simulation tools are technology gaps to be overcome in the next decade.
• Simulation tools and numerical modelling for investment and resource planning, robot programming and process modelling have been developed and are used by leading actors along the value chain. Those tools need to be further improved for new manufacturing processes and materials and to be integrated. Logistics and supply chain management are one of the major advantages of leading European yards versus their competitors.
• Automation of pre-assembly processes primarily of metallic structures has reached an impressive level in leading shipyards with a clear European lead in the use of low distortion welding processes. The level of mechanization and automation in block and final assembly, in outfitting, repair and retrofitting, in smaller shipyards and in the production of offshore structures bears a significant potential.
• The use of innovative materials and material combinations has made significant progress during the last years, but due to lacking long-term experience, lacking standardization and high cost and insufficient work sharing along the supply chain is not common practice yet. Nonetheless, the use of advanced material combinations, lightweight and adaptive structures, innovative coatings is a major contribution for greener shipping and competitiveness of shipyards and ship operators.

e-Maritime
In order to form a comprehensive overview of the current state-of-the-art for e-Maritime, projects were initially categorised against four main focus areas:

• Ship operations and e-Navigation
• Port operations
• Logistics Chain
• Regulations Management

For the purpose of this overview, e-Maritime was defined as the use of information exchange technologies to establish more secure and safer cooperation between ships and onshore stakeholders, in order to facilitate sustainable maritime transport.

A review of specific systems and applications of ICT technologies for exchanging information in the maritime domain, developed globally, indicated that European applications were considered to be state-of-the-art and more advanced in some areas, such as in the logistics domain and in Port Community Systems.

The rapid development in information and communication technologies will significantly increase digitalisation in all waterborne sectors. A higher degree of systems automation, the availability of smart sensors and global networks for data transfer between ship and shore will promote remote controlled, and semi or fully autonomous operation of assets. This will require secure systems and operations against cyber-attacks. Growing digitalisation in all waterborne sectors will result in the use of electronic data as a substitute for current legal paper documentation. It will also have a significant influence on how assets are designed and operated.

The main directions and topics for further technology developments that are beginning to emerge are as follows:

• Smart Ships: Vessels with reduced manning levels and automated information management and surveillance with shore-based assistance, protected from cyber-security risks. Improved integration with shore support centres for technical operation and remote maintenance.
• Smart Ports: Digital infrastructure and ICT innovation for ports, including: Robotics and automation; autonomous vehicles; the Internet of Things and Big Data Analytics, simulation and virtual reality, and cyber-security.
• European Marine Digital Highway: Shore-based marine information and communication infrastructure linked with the corresponding navigational and communication facilities aboard ships.
• Innovation in Hinterland Connectivity: Improved interconnectivity and integration between transport modes and established systems; safe and interconnected systems for data exchange and supply chain optimisation.

The key research priorities and the RDI needs for future development are as follows:

Ship Operations:
• Development of Decision Support and monitoring for on-board operations to capture information from machinery and bridge systems integrated in a reliable and maintainable network with high availability and connectivity, for a more efficient, safer and environmentally friendly operation.
• Development of e-inspection systems for monitoring for hull and machinery providing access to inspection tools database for a particular entity.
• Development of systemic model for a human oriented onboard Resilient Shipping Environment focused on improving the attractiveness of the seafarer profession, and the safety culture.
• Development of a decision support tool for Shipping Companies to optimise their crew repository information and long term assignment.
• Development of state of the art solutions for on board ship administration to provide integrated solutions for engine and bridge e-logs, crew allocation and resting hours monitoring, Master General Account, Crew licences and certificates etc.
• Development of a Decision support tool for e-Performance, incorporating AI and an energy efficient operation index (EEOI) adjusted for the actual vessel and voyage particulars.
• Development of information exchange protocol standards for e-Maritime Strategic Framework (EMSF) interoperability and standardisation of document formats, Ship Inspection Report Programme (SIRE) reports, and Charterers enquiries, etc.

e-navigation:
• Integrated approach to ship navigation; including the bridge systems and the integration of bridge systems with human operators, other ships, and the VTS as well as SAR.
• New systems for cooperation between vessel traffic services and ships for efficient transport systems, including the development of remote control or autonomous ships.
• Development of open solutions for integrated ship control to enable increased involvement of smaller manufacturers, more innovation and lower cost systems.
• Development of new interfaces for integration between bridge systems and the operator, including alarm management, to improve the human factor.
• Development of navigation solutions for smaller craft similar to those emerging for international shipping; this includes all types of information from charts, and alarm and warning systems related to safety of shipping.
• Development of open information standards for data, data transmissions and data networks for increasing the innovation rate in the e-Navigation area.

Port Operations and Ship-Shore Interfaces:
• Development of Intelligent holistic solutions for the efficient management of ships in ports for freight, passengers and workers, integrated with Urban Mobility Plans and solutions.
• Optimisation of interconnectivity between transport modes for efficient, safe, secure and environmental operation.
• Further harmonisation of customs procedures, vessel’s calls and clearance at ports, and IT systems adapted to the new regulations.
• Best practices repository for supporting e-Port Operations and processes, including mechanisms to facilitate knowledge exchange of enabling technologies in port operations and new e-port services.
• Development of existing interoperable e-Maritime systems (PCS, SW, CCS, TOS, TMS, etc.) and electronic ecosystems to extend the scope, functionalities and performance of current existing systems.
• Developments to improve the interoperability and integration between transport modes, including advanced logistic chain management systems and operational tools, to facilitate very fast sea/land interchange.
• Developments to increase the data exchange between ports in order to improve the situational awareness, the whole port call efficiency and track-and-trace information.
• Upgrading and update of current port IT systems e.g. PCS and development of new services exploiting IoT and Big Data analytics capabilities

Logistics:
• Development of decision Support and Monitoring Systems enabled for cloud operations for all actors both at the office as well as mobile users and integration to the different systems (e.g. SafeSeaNet, AIS, LRIT, eCustoms, etc.) to improve data quality and operational efficiency.
• Development of Big Data and Analytics, offering quality data to all interested parties, in order to improve service provision.
• Development of improved Security Systems to increase check and control reliability and improve the security at a European level, and to improve interoperability and control quality among governmental agencies.
• Development of systems to improve compliance, reduce red tape and enforce clear, understandable and European wide regulations to reduce unnecessary administrative complexity and the time involved.
• Advanced interoperable and secure networks and mechanisms, for the facilitation of knowledge exchange along the logistics chain and for efficient and reliable transport services.
• Harmonising and simplifying National and international requirements for ports and ships operating in different Member States for a more coordinated reporting formalities through the European Maritime Single Window.
• Advanced co-operative multimodal transport networks to fully integrate short-sea shipping and inland waterways into the logistics chains, with greater interoperability between systems.
• Development of improved interfaces between sea and multimodal transportation to enhance the competitiveness of short sea shipping. Integration of e-Maritime tools to include logistics operators, rail operators, short sea shipping providers and inland waterways operators
• The establishment of a Coordination and Support Action for transport users and researchers to identify areas where joint efforts will bring the greatest added value, enabling the transport sector to become more efficient, economical and environmentally sustainable.
• Further development of common definitions, rules, and common interoperable management framework architecture in order to improve the cooperation between the partners in the logistics chain. The applicability, scope, and commercial acceptance of standardization efforts also need to be addressed.

Regulations Management:
• Development of a data map from the internal system to the Maritime Single Window to enable automatic submission of reports.
• Further work is required on technical specifications and procedures for the National Single Windows (and the Maritime Single Window focusing on maritime transportation).

Market, Societal and Regulatory Trends to 2030

The MESA foresight activity provided market, societal and regulatory trends, with the aim of comparing these with present and expected technology developments and, thus, to be able to derive R&D needs to address identified gaps. This document provided the consolidated impacts on the waterborne industry foreseen until 2030 based on an analysis of the previously identified trends on population growth, food and water demand and supply, societal expectation related to health, safety, environmental and security, economic and waterborne trade growths, energy demand and supply, climate change and environmental damages and the effects of ICT. The following key trends and impacts were identified:

• Continued population growth and urbanization increases demand for focused waterborne services and upgrading of infrastructure
• Food and water demand is increasing with supply becoming challenged which calls for more water transport and aquatic food production.
• Society’s increasing expectations to adequate health, safety, security and the impact of industries on the environment will lead to more strict regulations and require the waterborne industries to improve in these areas.
• Developing countries will continue increasing their share in global economic growth, which will in turn increase trade in particular among these countries.
• Global growth of population and GDP will increase energy consumption, despite higher energy efficiency of facilities and equipment.
• Waterborne trade growth will be driven by economic growth of developing countries and global growth in demand for food, water and technological products.
• Climate change will lead to more flooding, draughts, extreme weather events and polar melting and will impact all waterborne sectors.
• The fast development in information and communication technologies will increase digitalization in all waterborne sectors and will significantly influence design and operation of assets

Vision 2030
As a consequence of the above inputs, the Vision 2030 has been agreed as follows:
Powered by continuing research and innovation, the EU maritime industry will maintain its position as a global leader in high value maritime business. Our ships will be the smartest, greenest and safest on the World’s seas; our autonomous vessels will be an increasingly common sight around the world and our passenger ships will be renowned globally for their safety and sophistication.
Smart ships, smart ports and smart infrastructure will be facilitated by the growing EU maritime data highway which will provide high capacity, low cost and secure data communications around our coasts. Close to zero environmental impact will be achieved by clean engines and clean fuels, low resistance hulls and rigorous management of all emissions. Adoption of green technologies on the operating fleet will be facilitated by plug-in refitting solutions.
Electric vessels in and around our maritime cities will be the norm. Port facilities will include clean, shore based power for larger vessels, and smaller vessels will routinely enter and leave ports and harbours under electric propulsion.
New sensors, data management and communications technologies will not only pave the way towards reduced manning and vessel autonomy but will also allow for smarter, cleaner and safer vessels. Fully integrated transport logistics will ensure the seamless transfer of materials and goods from source to final destination.
Safety and security of our shipping will be enhanced further by the development of improved materials for impact and fire resistance, by a better understanding of ship behaviour in abnormal conditions and by improved emergency planning and execution.
The EU will continue to lead the way with the design, build and operation of innovative, flexible, modular, and highly efficient working boats. With the inexorable increase in shipping and offshore activity, these vessels will take on an even more important role in the provision of the day to day services that keep our maritime industry on the move. The new challenges of Blue Growth will be met with specialised vesses, that are modular and reconfigurable throughout their entire operational life.
Increasing wealth around the world will lead to a growing middle class, with more disposable income to spend on goods, services and leisure. The EU will retain its lead in the design, build and operation of cruise vessels to satisfy this market and the recreational marine sector will lead the world with innovative craft responding to ever increasing customer expectations.
Advanced production technologies will underpin the high value products being built, using advanced modelling techniques, joining technologies and new materials to deliver flexible and cost effective solutions.
The future for the EU maritime industry is bright, with global trends clearly indicating an increasing market for the sophisticated, high value technologies and products for which our industry is renowned.

Potential Impact:
The primary objective of the MESA project is to provide a vision for research and innovation within the European maritime sector, and to encourage the implementation of that vision within industry, academia, waterborne transport operators, and European and national policy makers. Consequently the wide dissemination of that vision, and supporting documents, across Europe is of primary importance. It is also important that European stakeholders have the opportunity to update that vision, on an ongoing basis, as technological, market, regulatory, societal and environmental factors change.
The primary dissemination routes will be through the following:
• Waterborne TP, including its proposed new working groups
• Vessels for the Future Association
• Members States, through the Waterborne TP Mirror Group
• Other Transport and non-transport ETPs, where there is the opportunity for collaborative projects or technology transfer, e.g. related to energy efficiency, automation, materials, manufacturing, and renewable energy; as well as advanced logistics and intelligent mobility.
The primary information source will be the new Waterborne TP website. All documentation will be visible, and with feedback/recommendations for revision actively encouraged. This is particularly the case for those background documents, e.g. State-of-the-Art analyses.
One of the key impacts of the updated Strategic Documents, i.e. Vision 2030; SRIA; and Implementation Plan, is as the Waterborne TP input to discussions on the formulation of work programmes for Horizon 2020 and its successor Framework Programmes, representing a common view of the maritime sector, as represented by the wider European maritime associations, including ship builders, marine equipment manufacturers, research institutes, classification societies, and academia.
However, these strategic documents, and the valuable technological and foresight information within, are of value to other public and private organisations. For example, a number of Member States and Associated Countries are studying the contents, with a view to taking on their conclusions within their own National RDI Programmes. In addition, it will provide valuable information to individual companies and research institutes, in relation to privately funded RDI and commercial exploitation.
During the project the Dissemination Team was responsible for a number of activities, focussed on ensuring European-wide exploitation of the results of the MESA project, and to ensure the project itself benefited from receiving input from European industry, academia, ship operators, policy makers, etc. These activities included:
• The 3rd and 4th European Maritime Research Policy Conferences
• Support of TRA 2014 and 2016
• Development of a new Waterborne TP Website, with a message board facility to receive feedback on the TTG , Foresight and Strategic reports
• The Maritime Brokerage Event [MIBE2015]
• Waterborne Newsletters
• Production of the RDI Success Stories brochure
• Production of the SRIA brochures

A FOSTER Cross-modal Long Distance Freight Transport Workshop, was held on 30 January 2014 in Brussels. Both BMT and SEA Europe attended this workshop. The aim of the workshop was to discuss cross modal RTD topics for long distance freight transport, which involve at least two surface transport modes, and how to address them in future research programmes. Connecting transport modes was considered an important topic by the Commission and its linking with TEN-T and the Connecting Europe Facility an important goal, where Logistics and ICT play a key role. BMT and Sea Europe subsequently became partners in the SETRIS project, together with ERTRAC and ERRAC and other partners.
As a result of the important work of the MESA activities, the key areas for future opportunities have been identified as:
Smart vessels, fleets and ports
Waterborne transport will be an integral part of an efficient logistic chain. Connection with other transport modalities, or inland-waterway transport, will be seamless. Smart vessels will communicate with smart ports to limit congestion, waiting time and thus costs. Smart vessels will adapt their sailing speed to match harbour slots automatically.
An important facilitator for seamless integration of transport modalities will be the further harmonisation of administration between EU member states and regions. Smart vessels will automatically file the necessary paperwork, and provide port authorities with cargo information.
Constant real-time connected and monitored vessels worldwide will see ships become more closely integrated into logistics or supply chains. Global companies will focus on using a whole fleet to best effect, generating cost savings and improving revenue generation. This has the potential to create new shipping services, such as online cargo service marketplaces, more efficient pooling and leasing of assets, and new alliances.
Smart vessels will be able to adapt their operations not only to congestion in ports, but also to for instance weather conditions. Fuel consumption over the whole sailing route will be minimised by taking weather predictions and loading condition into account for selecting the optimal route and speed.
Ports will facilitate the energy transition of the fleet, by providing bunkering possibilities for different fuels, as well as recharging capabilities for electric or hybrid vessels. Safe solutions for bunkering of LNG will be provided, possible away from the quay.
Automated and autonomous vessels
With the increasing possibilities of ICT technologies, ships will become fully connected 24x7 throughout the world. This will create a wealth of opportunities in automated and autonomous vessels. Starting already now is remote monitoring of vessels, allowing for condition-based maintenance. Building on the increasing automation on-board, remote operations of vessels will become possible, eventually moving towards full autonomy of vessels. The wider use of Unmanned Autonomous Vessels (UAVs) – either aerial, underwater or on surface – will increase flexibility and energy efficiency of operations.
Remote operations require automation of all main systems on-board, and integration into a single communication channel to shore. A critical component will be the advanced navigation system, that will be able to maintain a vessel’s course, detect and adapt to changing sea and weather conditions, avoid collisions and operate the ship efficiently within specified safety parameters. The system will be flexible to allow for different levels of autonomy, depending on location, congestion, or emergencies.
On-shore control centres will be responsible for operating vessels in congested sea lanes, or in proximity to ports and terminals, and in emergency situations. These control centres will be equipped with system simulators designed to swiftly simulate scenarios including all ships involved, and facilitate human intervention.
Reliability and security of communication will be key to the success of the connected vessel.

Ultra low energy and emissions vessels and systems
LNG will be the main fuel, with uptake first on short-sea ships operating in areas with developed gas bunkering infrastructure. Large ocean-going vessels will follow when bunkering infrastructure becomes available around the world. All new-builds will be equipped with multi-fuel engines, to allow for a smooth transition of main fuels.
Ultra low or zero emissions will be achieved by electric propulsion in special areas, such as ports or ECAs. Locally operating vessels will be fully electric; other vessels will have hybrid propulsion systems. Ships will become wind-assisted, and batteries for non-propulsion workload will be recharged by solar energy.
The power required to propel the ship will be minimal due to high efficiency propulsors, air lubrication or special coatings, and a hull design optimal for actual operational conditions. Latest virtual reality and simulation tools will be used to design the ship fit for operations.
Safe, secure and adaptable passenger vessels for inland, inshore and offshore duties
Increasing population in coastal will require safe and swift waterborne transport. Ferries will be built according to high safety standards and with low emissions. Many ferries will be all electric, recharging in ports and from solar energy.
Demand for cruising will be driven by the growing middle class worldwide. Next generation cruise vessels will not only be larger, but also more diversified to match local market requirements and environmental restrictions. Use will be made of the newest light-weight materials to save energy. Noise emissions under water will be low to comply with strict regulations. Customer experience will be enhanced by more open spaces and glass in the superstructure, and by an integrated interconnection between ship’s IT infrastructure and passengers wearable devices.
The structural and safety aspects will be tackled by the latest insights in composites with regards to strength and fire resilience, hydrodynamic loads in the structure in intact and damaged situations, and in human behaviour for evacuation. Innovative rescue equipment will be applied.
Many technologies developed for cruise vessels and ferries will be applied to the newest recreational craft. On the other hand, recreational craft will be used as test bed for larger vessels, because of their relatively low power demand. Examples will be the electrification, and use of lightweight new materials. Super yachts will be used as launching customer for cutting edge technologies.
In a polarising world, security of passenger vessels against outside attacks is a growing concern. The newest vessels will be able to withstand outside terrorist attacks, and be invulnerable for digital hijacking.
Flexible craft for coastal and offshore duties
With the onset of the Blue Economy, an increasing number of vessels for coastal and offshore duties will be in operation. Although many of these activities require dedicated vessels, all activities benefit from lowering of costs by employing a modular design of vessel and equipment. Within a relatively short period of time, ships can be refurbished to facilitate new offshore activities. Many of the vessels will be deployed as search-and-rescue vessels in case of calamities.
The offshore workboats will be characterised by a large operation window in adverse sea states. Cost of operation will be minimised by allowing crew to perform their tasks in a safe and healthy manner for most of the year. Although energy efficiency will not be the main economical driver for these vessels, dedicated ship design and propulsors will ensure a low power consumption in transit and operation. Noise emissions, both into the ship and under water, will be low to comply with strict regulations.
Green, efficient and flexible inland-waterway vessels
The new generation inland-waterway vessels will provide an integrated, energy-efficient, and flexible alternative to road transport.
Emissions from inland shipping will be very low through the use of low-carbon fuels, and hybrid propulsion. Dedicated shallow-water propulsors, and air lubrication will increase the efficiency of ship significantly.
All ships will be digitally connected to shore and each other to exchange information on local water depth, current profile, operations of locks, and congestion. Based on this information, the operation of the vessel is optimised with respect to fuel consumption and interaction with the logistic chain. Parts of the river navigation will be autonomous.
Flexibility of the inland fleet will be achieved by modular concepts, and the further application of barge trains.

List of Websites:
The address of the project public website: http://waterborne-tp.org

Related information

Documents and Publications

Reported by

Community of European Shipyards Associations asbl
Belgium

Subjects

Transport
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