Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

FP7

BIOSONIC Report Summary

Project ID: 315550
Funded under: FP7-SME
Country: United Kingdom

Final Report Summary - BIOSONIC (Novel Mobile Sonification Process for Local Valorisation of Lignocellulosic (Forest) Materials to produce Valuable Chemicals)

Executive Summary:
The BioSonic Project’s aim is to develop a novel ultrasonically-enhanced separation process that does not require high temperatures or pressures and is capable of producing pure wood fractions replacing the current harsh hydrolysis or steam explosion methods which degrade one or other of the output materials and performs much faster than traditional digestion processes. The BioSonic separation process is targeted to be cost-effective at a small enough scale to allow localised processing to take place. Due to its modular nature, it will also be easy to scale up for use in larger industrial settings, and as a drop-in piece of process plant for emerging bio-refinery fractionation of wood waste by SMEs at local, municipal and industrial scale.
The concept of the Lignocellulosic BioRefinery (LCBR) is gaining ground in the EU, as a way to increase the value obtained from wood waste such as sawdust and chippings, from €50/tonne to potentially as much as €500/tonne. To do this, the LCBR would cleanly fractionate the three components – cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin – without degrading them. Paper and bioethanol refineries create good cellulose at the expense of losing the value of the other two components through harsh reaction conditions. The absence of a non-degrading version of this process step has been quoted as a major barrier to commercialisation at the moment.

The BioSonic project aim is to develop a novel ultrasonically-enhanced separation process that does not require high temperatures or pressures, and is capable of producing pure wood fractions much faster than traditional digestion processes. The consortium consists of 3 SME-AGs who represent the forest operators that will benefit from the technology, and provide direct routes to market for the materials produced. They will train their member forestry SMEs in the operation of the new process, the strategic capacity planning for deployment to give best economy, and forging the relationships with the new supply chains of customers. The SME technology providers in the consortium will develop the technology at pilot plant level to demonstrate the effectiveness, economics and commerciality of the process, and provide training opportunities for potential operators. This ultrasonic process technology will be scalable for use by single SMEs at local, municipal and industrial scale.

Project Context and Objectives:
The BioSonic Project’s aim is to develop a novel ultrasonically-enhanced separation process that does not require high temperatures or pressures and is capable of producing pure wood fractions replacing the current harsh hydrolysis or steam explosion methods which degrade one or other of the output materials and performs much faster than traditional digestion processes. The BioSonic separation process is targeted to be cost-effective at a small enough scale to allow localised processing to take place. Due to its modular nature, it will also be easy to scale up for use in larger industrial settings, and as a drop-in piece of process plant for emerging bio-refinery fractionation of wood waste by SMEs at local, municipal and industrial scale.
The concept of the Lignocellulosic BioRefinery (LCBR) is gaining ground in the EU, as a way to increase the value obtained from wood waste such as sawdust and chippings, from €50/tonne to potentially as much as €500/tonne. To do this, the LCBR would cleanly fractionate the three components – cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin – without degrading them. Paper and bioethanol refineries create good cellulose at the expense of losing the value of the other two components through harsh reaction conditions. The absence of a non-degrading version of this process step has been quoted as a major barrier to commercialisation at the moment.
The overall industrial objective of the BioSonic project is the development of a pre-commercial prototype ultrasonic separation plant capable of very rapid, <30 minute, separation of up to 50 kg/hour of woody feedstock into three output streams – cellulose, lignin and C5/C6 compounds produced from the further hydrolysis of hemicellulose within the process equipment. Furthermore, we intend to produce the scale-up designs for a small industrial-scale plant capable of processing up to 500 kg/hour. This will enable the AG members, the forest owners, to either process themselves or sell to other processors of lignocellulose waste that is currently unused, to turn this into valuable materials.
We have selected 50 kg/hr as the prototype capacity because the plant needs to be of a certain minimum size to be scalable to the desired capacity (which again is a reasonable trade-off between mobile size and operator cost).
The scientific objectives of the project are to:
• To establish both empirically through a design of experiments approach the complex relationships between; pre-treatment processes and agents, pre-treatment conditions (pH, temperature, residence time), number of sonications (and whether any solid-liquid separation takes place in-between), organosolv liquor composition, frequency and power of the ultrasonics probe (and their effect on fractionation), distance of the slurry from the probe, time (flow rate of the slurry), pressure, thickness of slurry, composition of liquid phase in slurry, the pH and pKA of any acids being used, geometry of the sonication system
• To produce a model of the reaction dynamics to allow the calculation of scale factors
• To investigate the possibility for actual or “software” sensors for key process control parameters other than temp/pressure/pH, and to introduce these to the control strategy
The technological challenges of the project are to:
• To design and build a sonication unit with a reaction chamber which gives a sonic field distribution which can process the feedstock evenly in < 30mins, for a 50kg wet input (23% DM) rate.
• To design a separation process capable of >90% separation of the output streams at flow rates of up to 50 litres per hour
• To design and build a solids handling system with controlled size reduction and preforming capable of more than 50 kg/h continuous operation, which can be integrated with the sonication unit and vapour recovery systems.
• To design and build an automated control system with multipoint temperature, pressure, pH and conductivity measurements with time constant < 50 ms and squeeze valve feed rate control capable of closed loop control of the process to within +/- 10% (3SD) of optimum process conditions.
• To design and build the solvent extraction and recovery system to automatically separate the 3 streams, remove >95% of the solvent and return it to the input stages (in the case of the non-aqueous solvents).
• Assess the range and constraints of acceptable feedstocks, with respect to wood type, quality and moisture contents, particle size; also the trial other lignocellulosic materials such as straw and bagasse for compatibility. Design and optimise the pre-processing system for forestry waste
The Integrated technological objectives of the project are to:
• To design and construct a scaleable 50 kg/h continuous prototype reactor for < 30min sonic separation to 95% purity, and >70% efficiency, to prove the concept.
• To achieve repeatable product quality < 5% variation in distribution between output material yields from batch to batch of a given input material specification
• To use the prototype reactor to assess the range and constraints of acceptable feedstocks, with respect to wood type, quality and moisture contents; also the trial other lignocellulosic materials such as straw and bagasse for compatibility.
• To achieve a process able to repeatedly produce separation levels > 70% of wood weight
• To produce scalability designs for a reactor chamber design for 500 kg/h and max. 1000 kW sonication power for a plant with a manufacturing cost in serial production lower than € 750,000 including parts and be transportable.

Project Results:
The Bio-Sep Ltd’s patented novel ultrasonically-enhanced fractionation technology provides a low temperature (<100oC), low pressure (<5bar), intense physical pulping and reaction method for wood wastes, replacing the current harsh hydrolysis or steam explosion methods which degrade one or other of the output materials.
It uses this separation method to enable a low temperature and pressure version of a modified organosolv process to provide a continuous flow multistage plant that will break down lignocellulose (woody) material into its three useable material streams. The separation products will be useably pure / less degraded forms of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose (which can also be easily processed into C5 and C6 sugars within our process.

The concept of the Lignocellulosic BioRefinery (LCBR) is gaining ground in the EU, as a way to increase the value obtained from wood waste such as sawdust and chippings, from €50/tonne to potentially as much as €500/tonne. To do this, the LCBR would cleanly fractionate the three components – cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin – without degrading them. Paper and bioethanol refineries create good cellulose at the expense of losing the value of the other two components through harsh reaction conditions. The absence of a non-degrading version of this process step has been quoted as a major barrier to commercialisation at the moment. The BioSonic project aim is to develop a novel ultrasonically-enhanced separation process that does not require high temperatures or pressures, and is capable of producing pure wood fractions much faster than traditional digestion processes.

The Biosonic separation process is cost-effective at a small enough scale to allow localised processing to take place, overcoming the waste tourism problems that prevent the utilisation of waste products from dispersed SME producers. Due to its modular nature, it will also be easy to scale up for use in larger industrial settings, and as a drop-in piece of process plant for emerging bio-refinery operations. The low intensity processing conditions in Biosonic reactor will allow us to build smaller, lighter process vessels that do not need such stringent process safeguards, thus enabling us to provide mobile, flexible plant at an affordable price for SME users.
The mobile, rapid, safe bioseparation plant will process forest floor residue and wood waste on location, producing high value organic chemicals with up to 10 times the value of the woody biomass feedstock.
• Cellulose (€5bn world market) – can be used for fibres in paper, hygiene products, insulation; fillers; industrial chemical manufacture; conversion to bio-ethanol
• Lignin (€100M market) – used as solid fuel, as a biopolymer for binding and crystal modification, as a phenolic chemical precursor, and potentially as a carbon fibre source
• Hemicellulose (€1.3 Bn Euro market) – provides C5/C6 monosaccharides for food / pharma uses, as an oligosaccharide for stabilisers, coatings. Intermediate partially processed materials and mixtures such as lignosulphonates, could also be produced with this equipment and sold for lower production cost and lower price, giving lower-margin but still profitable production opportunities.
The technology will be able to produce, even at the small scale required by local processing
operations, and gross profit value of up to (502 - 328 =) €175 per tonne of wood waste processed. The economy of scale for the large model, operated more intensively, could result in profitability of (502-169 =) €330 per tonne of wood waste processed.
The Biosonic technology will benefit Forestry operators, who will have a technology that enables them to process low value production wastes (offcuts, sawdust, and forest floor waste) that otherwise would either be discarded or, at best, burnt as fuel. Continuous operation would require about 2-6 operators per plant, depending on size. In addition jobs will be created in collecting and local transport of feedstock materials.
Operators will be able to sell their output materials in various forms, analogous to current
modes of delivery used by some paper producers that have diversified to produce added value form their waste streams:

The overall objectives of the WP1 were:
• Define operational system and end-user specifications for overall BioSonic device.
• Establish both empirically through a design of experiments approach and modelling the complex relationships between; pre-treatment processes and agents, pre-treatment conditions (pH, temperature, residence time), number of sonications (and whether any solid-liquid separation takes place in-between), Organosolv liquor composition, frequency and power of the ultrasonics probe (and their effect on fractionation), distance of the slurry from the probe, time (flow rate of the slurry), pressure, thickness of slurry, composition of liquid phase in slurry, the pH and pKA of any acids being used, geometry of the sonication system.
• Conduct economics comparison with autoclave (Kraft cooking equivalent) technique as the standard for conversion targets
• Identify, explore and design up to 3 alternative conceptual lab scale solvent recovery system
• Compare suitability of available sensors for the auto-control system
The purpose of work package 1 was to set the project on a good footing by establishing the key objectives and specifications of the main project deliverable: the BioSonic pilot plant. A set of engagements were undertaken with key stakeholders to elicit requirements and to quantify them in a structured way. Desk-based design research was undertaken to explore alternative pathways for solvent and product recovery, from which conceptual designs were developed.
Significant Achievements in Work Package 1 included
• A User Requirement Specification for overall system, biomass flow & sensors
• Design of Experiments for initial stage of ultrasonics and process flow modelling
• Modelling of ultrasonics and process flow.
• Higher level techno-economic model for comparison of economics between Autoclave and second stage ultrasonics
• Design of Experiments for second stage of ultrasonics and process modelling giving optimal design
• Modelling of refined ultrasonics and flow in support of process optimisation.
• Effective and economic techniques for solvent recovery

The overall objectives of the WP2 were:
• Define the commercial feasibility of the BioSonic system.
• Identify and overcome any issues with upscaling to pilot plant scale and industrial scale

In WP2 initial investigation was carried out to identify and overcome any issues with up-scaling to the pilot plant scale and industrial scale. Whilst the lab system is well contained and processes a small amount of material, the main implications of scale up to pilot plant to be considered were the health and safety risks (chemicals, heat, power etc.), capital cost, carbon footprint, processing cost and the design phase of the project which must specify the correct equipment to prevent unexpected failure. The desired specification for up-scaling the pilot plant to industrial was to be designed according to European standards such as ATEX, Machinery, Electromagnetic Compatibility, Pressure Equipment, etc. A training plan for the pilot plant prototype has been developed.
Significant Achievements in Work Package 2 included:
• Additional milling may be required to reduce particle size and reduce potential blockages; rigorous screening also recommended; particles less than 2 mm desired.
• Changes to the process from pilot scale include: heat integration, concentration of sugar product, recycling of solvents, ethanol flash distillation using the heat in the biosonication reactors, liming to neutralise sugar product stream and consideration of additional calcium oxalate product
• URS considers: (i) location; (ii) emitted waste and noise; (iii) system voltage; (iv) process water; (v) cooling water; (vi) process heat; (vii) sawdust, organic acid, ethanol and MIBK storage; (viii) sugar solution, lignin and pulp product storage; (ix) corrosion resistance; (x) wastewater; (xi) waste organics and solids; (xii) safety relating to ignition and the materials used.
• A HAZID and HAZOP completed
• Training of pilot plant activities given to relevant project partners and supporting documentation provided;
• Operation Manual for use with pilot plant and to assist training
• BioSonic appears competitive in comparison with rival pre-treatment technologies taken from the literature (see Figure 3 in attachment)
• A series of recommendations for future enhancement of modelling outlined
The overall objectives of the WP3 were:
Build a first prototype based on developed specifications for the sonicator.
• Conduct lab testing on the sonicator, then improve and build another prototype which will also be tested.
• Using results of lab testing, build a final sonicator prototype unit with a reaction chamber which gives a sonic field distribution which can process the feedstock evenly in < 20 minutes, for a 50kg wet input (23% DM) rate per hour.
WP3 is at the core of the innovation in this project. Its main objective is to build a fully functional prototype of the sonicator including a continuous flow loop, recirculation system and effective temperature and pressure control, capable of processing up to 100g of feedstock per cycle.
Significant Achievements in Work Package 3 included:
• Improvements in hemicellulose yield were found when performing experiments in 0.1 M oxalic acid, rather than the acidified organosolv
• 2 pass BioSonic process developed, where pass 1 was an acid pre-treatment (1% oxalic acid, aqueous) and pass 2 was an acidified organosolv treatment (0.5% oxalic acid, 49.5% water, 34% ethanol, 16% MIBK)
• Summary of requirements and design formulated as summarised in Table 2 of the attachment
• Sonication unit built and commissioned with rest of pilot plant

The overall objective of WP4 were:
• to design the end product separation unit for the process, to separate the main reactant phases, and potentially to separate the C5/C6 sugar mixture if that is desired in the end user specification
Work in WP4 developed a number of alternative process designs through modelling and experimentation, and the final design was based on the innovation of using distillation to extract the liquid lignin, sugars and solvents. A comprehensive suite of analytic techniques for determining product quality and purity, to provide offline analysis in support of the pilot plant was also provided.
Significant Achievements in Work Package 4 included:
• Relevant analysis techniques for each type of product in the BioSonic Process identified including detail on analysis techniques
• Significant equipment items and associated P&ID obtained
The overall objective of WP5 were:
• This work package will focus on the requirements for sensor, software and hardware development for control and operational stability of the BioSonic solution
• To design and build an automated control system with multipoint temperature, pressure and the required process measurements with time constant < 500 ms and squeeze valve feed rate control capable of closed loop control of the process to within +/- 10% (3SD) of optimum process conditions

The control software specification is divided into 2 parts. The PLC software and the user interface software that runs on the HMI screen. The PLC software specification was developed for every stage in the representation of flow diagram. The Biosonic control software was developed and commissioned with all the sensors and HMI interface and have been successfully implemented, integrated and tested with the rest of the BioSonic software
Significant Achievements in Work Package 5 included:
• Developed specification for the implementation of the algorithm design
• Defined communications interfaces and software requirements for the HMI and PLC
• Implemented PLC code for SIMATIC S7-1500 PLC and HMI for TP1500 Comfort panel
• Development of the PLC code and HMI screens
• Initial testing completed successfully with minor corrections undertaken on the PLC and HMI code
• The Biosonic control software developed and commissioned with all the sensors and HMI interface
• During the initial runs and trials, further optimisation and changes have been successfully implemented in the software
The overall objectives of work package 6 are:
• Assess the range and constraints of acceptable feedstocks, wrt wood type, quality and moisture contents; also the trial other Lignocellulosic materials such as straw and bagasse for Compatibility. Design and optimise the pre-processing system for forestry waste to sawdust conversion, down to 3mm – 1mm.
• To design and build a solids handling system with controlled size reduction and preforming capable of more than 50 kg/h continuous operation, which can be integrated with the sonication unit and vapour recovery systems
Work in WP6 related to investigation of the effects of particle size and feedstock type on the BioSonic process and the associated modelling aspect including release of sugars and lignin, as well as the use of different feedstocks in the overall BioSonic process. An alternative techniques and a pilot machine has been built and successfully demonstrated for one step, wood powder significantly finer and more uniform than regular sawdust.
Significant Achievements in Work Package 6 included:
• The recovery of both hemicellulose and lignin fractions successfully modelled
• The use of different feedstocks modelled in an Excel-based process model
• The key findings for lignin and hemicellulose recoveries from the lab facility, using spruce, oak and pine, obtained as % of original biomass
• Lignin is released at an increased rate for oak in comparison to pine and spruce
• The additional extractives and acid soluble lignin in oak cause an artificial increased initial hemicellulose sugar recovery, but subsequently sugars are released at the same rate
• Different feedstock size investigated does not have a significant effect on the release of lignin and hemicellulose
• The BioSonic process is flexible and can be applied to several different feedstocks
• The hard-wood (oak) showed a greater rate of recovery of lignin than the soft-woods (pine and spruce)
• The size of the biomass appears not to effect recoveries significantly, which is positive for the process as large energy inputs milling can be avoided
• Methods of dust reduction proposed
• A hypothetical continuous size reduction process for wood chip proposed including a batch-wise process.
• Storage and handling requirements established for the pilot plant.
• Pilot machine developed and successfully demonstrated for one step, wood powder significantly finer and more uniform than regular sawdust
The overall objectives of work package 7 are:
• To design and build the solvent extraction and recovery system to automatically separate the 3 streams, remove >99% of the solvent and return it to the input stages (in the case of the non-aqueous solvents).
• To design and construct a scaleable 50 kg/h continuous prototype reactor for < 20s sonic separation to 95% purity, and >70% efficiency to prove the concept.
• To achieve repeatable product quality < 5% variation in distribution between output material yields from batch to batch of a given input material specification
• To achieve a process able to repeatedly produce separation levels > 70% of wood weight.
• To achieve scalability designs for a reactor chamber design for 500 kg/h and max. 1000 kW sonication power for a plant with a manufacturing cost in serial production lower than € 750,000 including parts and fit in a single 15m ISO container.
Work in WP7 in P2 was undertaken to complete the Design and Build of the Overall System and included completion of the definition and sourcing of the auxiliary items, design and build of the solvent recycling system, and integration of the complete system leading to evaluation, and comparison of the development trial results
Significant Achievements in Work Package 7 included:
• Full set of documentation including final Functional Design Specification, the final P&IDs and Bill of Materials, a summary of contents of a HAZID and HAZOP review and the Operation Manual, as well as high level Standard Operating Procedures and a supporting Experimental Data Sheet.
• A process model successfully written, supported by a heat integration framework and an Economics Model
• The material balance for a 450 kg/hr (biomass, dry basis) plant and product break-down, reported
• Material balance for BioSonic process including calculation of Heat and cooling flows
• An optimum Heat Exchanger Network Design proposed, giving energy savings of 87.9%.
• A summary of results for economic case studies obtained
The overall objectives of work package 8 are:
• Install the BioSonic system at selected test site.
• Testing of prototype BioSonic system, Laboratory and in-field testing of BioSonic system.
• Life cycle analysis.
Work in WP8 related to the final pilot plant trials and performance validation
Significant Achievements in Work Package 8 included:
• The BioSonic technology designed to enable forestry companies to process waste wood on or near to sawmills and pulping sites in order to benefit from the high value of its constituent parts.
• The BioSonic process focuses on the woody biomass supply chain input produced by forestry owners but can also be suitable for agriculture, plantation or processing of output lignocellulosic waste, and possibly by adaptation of technology for paper and textile waste material.
• The use of bio-based plastics, derived from biorefinery, will lead to a more sustainable society and help solve global environmental and waste management problems.
• Heat integration, to as great an extent as is economically possible, is important in reducing the environmental impacts of the BioSonic process
• The BioSonic process is projected to have a global warming footprint potential of 0.18 kg CO2e/kg [dry biomass]. This is comparable to analogous processes considered in the BioCore project.
• The Life Cycle Assessment completed
• Visual observation of the samples using sonication suggests that the wood has been more effectively fractionated, with much finer particles in the slurry, no large wood pieces suspended in the liquid and a much darker liquor

Potential Impact:
The Bio-Sep Ltd’s patented novel ultrasonically-enhanced fractionation technology will provide a low temperature (<100oC), low pressure (<5bar), intense physical pulping and reaction method for wood wastes, replacing the current harsh hydrolysis or steam explosion methods which degrade one or other of the output materials.
It uses this separation method to enable a low temperature and pressure version of a modified organosolv process to provide a continuous flow multistage plant that will break down lignocellulose (woody) material into its three useable material streams. The separation products will be useably pure / less degraded forms of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose (which can also be easily processed into C5 and C6 sugars within our process.
The Biosonic separation process is cost-effective at a small enough scale to allow localised processing to take place, overcoming the waste tourism problems that prevent the utilisation of waste products from dispersed SME producers. Due to its modular nature, it will also be easy to scale up for use in larger industrial settings, and as a drop-in piece of process plant for emerging bio-refinery operations. The low intensity processing conditions in Biosonic reactor will allow us to build smaller, lighter process vessels that do not need such stringent process safeguards, thus enabling us to provide mobile, flexible plant at an affordable price for SME users.
The mobile, rapid, safe bioseparation plant will process forest floor residue and wood waste on location, producing high value organic chemicals with up to 10 times the value of the woody biomass feedstock.
• Cellulose (€5bn world market) – can be used for fibres in paper, hygiene products, insulation; fillers; industrial chemical manufacture; conversion to bio-ethanol
• Lignin (€100M market) – used as solid fuel, as a biopolymer for binding and crystal modification, as a phenolic chemical precursor, and potentially as a carbon fibre source
• Hemicellulose (€1.3 Bn Euro market) – provides C5/C6 monosaccharides for food / pharma uses, as an oligosaccharide for stabilisers, coatings. Intermediate partially processed materials and mixtures such as lignosulphonates, could also be produced with this equipment and sold for lower production cost and lower price, giving lower-margin but still profitable production opportunities.
The technology will be able to produce, even at the small scale required by local processing operations, and gross profit value of up to (502 - 328 =) €175 per tonne of wood waste processed. The economy of scale for the large model, operated more intensively, could result in profitability of (502-169 =) €330 per tonne of wood waste processed.
The Biosonic technology will benefit Forestry operators, who will have a technology that enables them to process low value production wastes (offcuts, sawdust, and forest floor waste) that otherwise would either be discarded or, at best, burnt as fuel. Continuous operation would require about 2-6 operators per plant, depending on size. In addition jobs will be created in collecting and local transport of feedstock materials.
Operators will be able to sell their output materials in various forms, analogous to current modes of delivery used by some paper producers that have diversified to produce added value form their waste streams:
Based on the retail price of the output materials, the income achieved from chemical production from 150,000 tonnes of wood residue could rise to the level of €75million. Within this turnover figure, the value added could eventually rest between 150 and 300 € per tonne of material processed, depending on the scale of the operation.
There will obviously be a learning curve needed toward making the full use of the technology, so it is prudent to assume that the full potential value will not be reached in the first five years. Hence, taking a conservative estimate that, on average the professional users would only reach €175 of profitability per tonne of material processed, there would be an annual added value for the European forestry operators of €26 million for the processing of 150,000 tonnes, after allowing for the capital and operating costs of investing in the equipment. With the retail prices, and a mix of sales biased toward the smaller plants, we would expect there to be equipment sales of €25 million turnover (€10 million gross profit) to the supply chain SMEs in the consortium. These plant manufacturers belong to a SME dominated group of 180,000 enterprises that manufacture machinery and equipment.
At the EC level, the project results within the first 5 years post project are expected to be a direct increase in European turnover for the project beneficiaries of around €100 million, from the increased income for the forestry SMEs and the sales value for the equipment suppliers. This, resulting from a project with a total contribution value of €1.6 million, and followed up by a similar amount of investment in production of equipment, gives a return on investment ratio of more than 30:1.
From the point of view of the project participants, their joint value-added (profit) of €36 million is the result of their contributions to the project (€0.5M) and their post project investment of €1.6M, giving them a potential return on investment ratio of 17
With the new plants producing over €50 million of added value by year 5, and assuming €
100,000 turnover per capita, some 500 jobs will be created or protected in the rural districts and manufacturing companies in Europe
Main Dissemination Activities:
The BioSonic technology and process has continued to be disseminated to a wide range of EU academic institutions, research and development organisations, trade associations, forestry owners and administrators, biorefiners and biochemical processors, product manufacturers and other industrialists engaged in biotechnological activities through attendance at conferences and exhibitions, symposia and trade shows, poster presentations and leaflet distribution, live demonstrations of the pilot plant and other less formal contacts.
Description of Significant Results Obtained:
• The BioSonic Web Portal for partner and public use, http://www.biosonic-fp7.eu has continued to be updated on a regular basis including introductory presentation, videos of test rig and pilot plant operations, and five press releases
• BioSonic Project ‘Image’ has also been created and the intention is to apply for a Trade Mark
• BioSonic poster and leaflet production and update Oral presentations, poster sessions and leaflet distribution
• Members of the Consortium have been involved in over 62 major dissemination activities including attended conferences, seminars, symposia and trade shows, and raised the profile of the BioSonic project
• Biosonic project represented at Warwick Centre for Industrial Biotechnology and Biorefining official opening on 21 Mar 2013 at University of Warwick, UK, EU Joint Biorefinery Projects Conference in Brussels on 11/12 Feb 2014, EU Parliamentary Policy Conference in Brussels on 14 Oct 2014, CEPF Members Day in Brussels on 10 Dec 14, Industrial Biotechnology Showcase in London on 11/12 Feb 15, ACHEMA World Forum for Chemical Engineering and the Process Industry in Frankfurt on 15/19 Jun 15, Forest based sector Technology Partnership (FTP) Partnering Event in Munich on 27 Oct 15, and European Forum for Biotechnology and Bioeconomy (EFIB) in Brussels on 28/29 Oct 15
• Biosonic project presented at UK-Norway Valorising Wood Biomass Symposium on 25/26 Jun 2013 in Harpenden, UK
• Direct contacts in excess of 246, listed in a database, with academics particularly chemists and chemical engineers, bio-researchers and developers, trade association representatives and advisory bodies, forest owners and biomass suppliers, biorefiners and biochemical processors, and downstream product manufacturers.
• 5 press releases have been issued, the fifth on project completion issued Mar 16
• Three Technical papers, which will be validated, peer reviewed and published during 2016
• Video produced summarising the experimental work carried out on the BioSonic project
• Slide presentation produced on the workings and capabilities of the BioSonic pilot plant including commentary on the operation of the pilot plant

List of Websites:
The address of the web-site is: http://www.biosonic-fp7.eu. On accessing the website, the website’s public area pages containing non-confidential information can be viewed.

Reported by

BIO-SEP LIMITED
United Kingdom
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