Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

FP7

GENDER-NET Report Summary

Project ID: 618124
Funded under: FP7-SIS
Country: France

Final Report Summary - GENDER-NET (Promoting gender equality in research institutions and the integration of the gender dimension in research contents)

Executive Summary:
The objective of the three-year GENDER-NET project (15 October 2013 to 15 October 2016) funded under the FP7 Science-in-Society work programme was to foster cooperation and coordination of initiatives carried out at national or regional level and addressing the common challenges still present in research institutions in achieving gender equality in research and innovation, namely, the persistent barriers and constraints to the recruitment, advancement and mobility of women as well as the lack of women in decision-making in the European scientific system, and the limited integration of the gender dimension in research programmes and contents which hinders research quality as well as the full potential for innovation.
GENDER-NET was the first ERA-NET (European Research Area Network) to be dedicated to gender equality in research, and to address it through both the promotion of structural change in research and higher education institutions, via the use of gender equality plans or equivalent initiatives, and through the promotion of the integration of sex and gender analysis into the various phases of the research cycle and into research-funding programmes.
The project brought together 13 national programme owners– i.e. ministries, national research-funding agencies or national organisations – from 12 countries in Europe and beyond (France, Spain, Norway, Switzerland, UK, Ireland, Cyprus, Belgium, Slovenia, Israel, Canada and the USA), with a shared commitment to gender equality. GENDER-NET also attracted a network of Observers, which grew from 3 to 10 organisations during the course of the project, and benefitted from the constructive support of an International Expert Advisory Board.
The GENDER-NET ERA-NET was a pilot transnational research policy initiative, purpose-built to foster mutual opening of national programmes and policies, strengthen the emergence of innovative joint strategies, policies and actions, and help reduce fragmentation across the ERA. Partners joined forces to strategically address this “gender challenge” through the following activities:
• Mapping and analysis of existing national initiatives, including awards, on the promotion of gender equality through structural change, and of their implementation at institutional level, and producing a synthesis report with recommendations, as well as common qualitative indicators for universities and other research-performing organisations to measure state-of-play and progress;
• Mapping and analysis of existing national initiatives promoting the integration of sex and gender analysis into research contents (IGAR), and developing guidelines, tools and recommendations (http://igar-tool.gender-net.eu; http://igar-map.gender-net.eu), as well as common indicators, in particular for research funding organisations;
• Identifying priority areas for transnational action and implementing selected strategic joint activities, which included: developing and piloting a joint gender equality training scheme, developing criteria for a transnational award on gender equality/IGAR, and devising a joint strategy for IGAR;
• Widely disseminating results – including via a project website (www.gender-net.eu) and a final dissemination and policy conference held in September 2016 in Paris, France, as part of the well-attended 9th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education –, widening the partnership, and exploring ways to sustain networking activities and further develop joint actions beyond the life of the project.
The GENDER-NET ERA-NET has successfully achieved its objectives, proving itself as a strategic tool for the implementation of ERA Priority 4 on gender equality and gender mainstreaming in research, and is cited in the Council Conclusions of 1 December 2015 as a reference network.
In addition, a call topic for an ERA-NET Cofund action explicitly based on the key findings of GENDER-NET was opened in the 2016 H2020 SwafS work programme. Several GENDER-NET members, joined by other national organisations, responded to that call with the GENDER-NET Plus proposal, which has just been positively evaluated, and should further strengthen gender equality in research and innovation across the EU by scaling up the joint efforts started in GENDER-NET.

Project Context and Objectives:
In March 2012, representatives from a number of national research programme owners and managers, which including ministries, funding agencies and other national organisations from EU Member States and associated countries, met in Brussels for an exploratory meeting on the possibility of setting up an ERA-NET scheme on the promotion of gender equality in research, based on existing national/regional programmes and initiatives.
The idea of taking advantage of the ERA-NET instrument (European Research Area Network) to step up the cooperation and coordination of programmes and initiatives carried out at national and regional level, with a view to their mutual opening and to the development and implementation of joint activities and policies on gender issues in research, had actually emerged several years earlier, shortly after the ERA-NET scheme itself had been introduced by the EC in FP6, among members of the then-called Helsinki Group on Women in Science. A proposal (acronym EOWIN) had been submitted in 2005, which, at the time, had not been successful.
In the different context of 2012, the EC was now envisaging to open a new call topic within the FP7 Science-in-Society work programme, for an ERA-NET more specifically dedicated to the promotion of gender equality in research institutions through structural change, and to the integration of the gender dimension into research contents, in order to address the persistent structural barriers to the recruitment, retention, advancement and mobility of women, and the lack of women in decision-making still existing in the European scientific system, as well as the very limited integration of the gender dimension into the various phases of the research cycle and in research programmes.
A core group of interested organisations – French CNRS and MESR, Spanish MINECO, Norwegian RCN and UK’s ECU – decided to pick up the challenge and build a proposal in response to call topic SiS-2013-2.1.1.2 ERA-NET which opened in the 2013 FP7 SiS work programme. CNRS took on the lead of the project, gathering interest from more national stakeholders from across Europe and North America, and an ambitious proposal was developed and submitted to the EC in 2013.
The successful GENDER-NET ERA-NET proposal initially brought together a consortium of 12 committed partners coming from 11 countries which included 7 Member States, 2 Associated Countries and 2 Third Countries, and consisted of 4 Ministries (from France, Spain, Slovenia, Switzerland), 7 National research organisations, agencies, authorities, councils, academies or foundations (from France, Norway, Ireland, Belgium, Cyprus, Canada and the USA) and 1 national charity organisation (from the UK), namely:
1. National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), France – coordinator
2. Ministry for National Education, Higher Education and Research (initially MESR, later becoming MENESR), France
3. Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (MINECO), Secretary of State for Research, Development and Innovation (SEIDI), Spain
4. Research Council of Norway (RCN), Norway
5. Department of Economy, Education and Research (WBF), State Secretariat for Education, Research and Innovation, Switzerland
6. Equality Challenge Unit (ECU), UK
7. Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canada
8. Higher Education Authority (HEA), Irish Research Council (IRC), Ireland
9. Fund for Scientific Research (FNRS), Belgium
10. Research Promotion Foundation (RPF), Cyprus
11. Ministry of Education, Science and Sport (MESS), Slovenia
12. National Academy of Science (NAS), USA
Three organisations were also joining from the start with an Observer status:
1. German Research Foundation (DFG), Germany
2. Dual Career Network Deutschland (DCN), Germany
3. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), Canada
As enshrined in the amendment to the Grant Agreement taking action on October 15th 2015, the consortium was expanded in the course of the project to include a thirteenth partner – the Israeli Ministry of Science, Technology and Space (MOST) joining for the last year of the project – and 10 observers. The following 7 organisations successively joined in, with an Observer status:
1. Austrian Science Fund (FWF), Austria
2. Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG), Austria
3. Technology Agency of the Czech Republic (TA ČR), Czech Republic
4. Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (MESC), Iceland
5. Committee for Gender Balance and Diversity in Research (KIF), Norway
6. NordForsk, Nordic cooperation on research and research infrastructure
7. National Science Foundation (NSF), USA.
The three-year ERA-NET project, with an allocated total budget of 1 545 219.39 €, started mid October of 2013 and concluded mid October of 2016.
The GENDER-NET work plan consisted of four Work Packages building on one another to propose a consistent and strategic transnational research policy initiative:
• WP1-Coordination, Management and Dissemination (led by CNRS, project coordinator Anne Pépin), divided into 6 Tasks: Tasks 1 and 2 addressing the set-up and implementation of project management and coordination, Task 3 covering the organisation of our consortium meetings, Task 4 on our communication and dissemination strategy and liaising with key stakeholders across Europe and beyond, Task 5 dedicated to the widening of the consortium, and final Task 6 on the development of plans for sustaining GENDER-NET joint activities beyond the life of the project;
• WP2-Gender Equality in Research Institutions through Structural Change (co-led by RCN and Swiss WBF, with a strong involvement of ECU), divided into 5 tasks: Task 1 to set-up and monitor the WP2 workplan, 3 mapping & analysis exercises carried out more or less in parallel in Tasks 2, 3 and 4, on national/regional and institutional level gender equality initiatives including laws, programmes, action plans and awards, and final Task 4 offering a synthesis of findings and identifying core elements for the development of strategic transnational initiatives and common indicators;
• WP3-Gendering Research Contents and Programmes (co-led by MINECO and Canadian CIHR), divided into 4 tasks: a set-up & WP-monitoring task, Task 2 dedicated to a mapping & analysis exercise of national/regional initiatives promoting the integration of the gender dimension into research contents containing 3 sub-Tasks addressing the successive steps (design and launch of an online survey, production of a compendium of collected material followed by a comparative analysis report), Task 3 on the development of a toolkit to support research-funding organisations, universities and researchers, and a final synthesis Task 4 on elevating the identified promising practices for the design of strategic transnational initiatives and common indicators;
• WP4-Strategic Transnational Activities and Policies (initially due to be led by MENESR, and eventually co-led by CNRS and MENESR), divided into 8 Tasks covering a selection of key joint transnational activities building on the results of WP2 and WP3: a first task to set-up and monitor the WP4 workplan; Task 2 on the development of gender equality trainings for decision-makers; Task 3 exploring a possible framework and methodology for a twofold joint Award/Incentive on gender in research; Task 4 developing joint qualitative indicators for measuring progress towards structural change in research-performing organisations; Tasks 5 and 6 addressing the development of a joint transnational strategy for integrating the gender dimension into research contents and programmes; Task 7 for identifying additional key topics for future joint action on gender equality in research; and finally, Task 8 focused on the organisation of a final dissemination and policy conference.
The specific objectives of this very first ERA-NET dedicated to gender equality in research were translated into 16 Deliverables, 4 for each Work Package (D1.1, D1.2, D1.3 and D1.4 for WP1; D2.5, D2.6, D2.7 and D2.8 for WP2; D3.9, D3.10, D3.11 and D3.12 for WP3; and D4.13, D4.14, D4.15 and finally D4.16, for WP4). Their respective contents are presented below, and described in greater details in section 4.1.3 of this report.
These Deliverables were attained through a set of 16 Milestones, which became 17 following the amendment procedure (3 milestones for WP1; 3 for WP2 as well; 4 for WP3; and 7 for WP4) and consisted of our kick-off and bi-annual consortium meetings, a succession of thematic workshops involving invited experts and key stakeholders, the launch of our key WP3 survey, the entry of new partners and observers, a high level strategic seminar on sex/gender analysis in research contents, a list of identified possible transnational gender equality activities for future implementation, and the final dissemination and policy conference.
The full list of updated Deliverables and Milestones has been provided online as a complement to the present narrative Final Report. All the project objectives were successfully reached, albeit with some delays, for which explanations have been duly provided in the project periodic reports for Months 1 to 18 (which was also our Deliverable D1.3) and Months 19 to 36 (submitted along with the current Final Report, which was our Deliverable D1.4).
With the aim to promote gender equality through structural change in research institutions, as well as the integration of sex and gender analysis into research contents and programmes, GENDER-NET partners have carried out extensive work, produced new findings, informed policy recommendations and developed innovative tools, designed trainings, organised key events and disseminated project results, which can be summarized as follows:
1. Through WP2: the mapping and analysis of national-level laws/programmes/policies/initiatives on the promotion of gender equality through structural change existing in GENDER-NET partner/observer countries (10 countries at the time; Deliverable D2.5 of Task 2) and how these translate at the institutional level (around 50 universities and research-performing organisations (RPOs) surveyed; Deliverable D2.6 of Task 3) as well as joint assessment of existing national/European Award schemes addressing the promotion of gender equality in research institutions (8 award schemes examined; Deliverable D2.7 of Task 4), and a synthesis report and impact assessment offering recommendations on identified priority topics (Deliverable D2.8 of Task 5)
2. Through WP3: the mapping (Deliverable D3.9 of Task 2a & 2b) and comparative analysis (Deliverable D3.10 of Task 2c) of national-level laws/strategies/policies/initiatives on the promotion of the Integration of sex and Gender Analysis into Research contents (IGAR), in Europe and beyond (40 national organisations surveyed, from 22 different countries). An interactive map has been created to present these results, with factsheets by country and organization, and level of implementation: http://igar-map.gender-net.eu/en/
3. Through WP3 as well, and WP4: the development of a manual for the implementation of IGAR, for research-funding organisations (RFOs), researchers and grant applicants, and reviewers/evaluators, as well as recommendations for the Integration of sex and Gender Analysis in University Curricula (IGAUC) in the STEM fields (Deliverable D3.11 of Task 3 of WP3). A practical and comprehensive website was specifically designed for this purpose: http://igar-tool.gender-net.eu/. A Strategic Seminar on IGAR for high-level research policy decision-makers from Member States and Associated Countries was also organised in Brussels in Spring of 2016 (Milestone MS17 of WP4 Task 5), a synthesis report based on WP3 results was produced with recommendations for transnational activities on IGAR (Deliverable D3.12) and a report on the steps taken by GENDER-NET towards a comprehensive joint strategy on IGAR was (Deliverable D4.16 of WP4 Tasks 5 and 6)
4. Through WP2, WP3 and WP4: the development of common indicators for measuring state-of-play and progress in the implementation of structural change in favour of gender equality in higher education and research institutions (Task 5 of WP2 and Deliverable D4.15 of Task 4 of WP4) and to monitor the implementation of IGAR and IGAUC (included in WP3 Deliverables D3.11 and D3.12), as well as the drafting of recommendations for the creation of a transnational European Award scheme, on both of the above themes (Deliverable D4.14 of WP4 Task 3)
5. Through WP4: the development of transnational trainings on gender equality and structural change in research and higher education, addressing unconscious bias more particularly and involving academic champions and scientific experts, targeted at national and institutional decision-makers, with 2 pilot sessions delivered in partner countries Slovenia and Cyprus, in June 2016, and the drafting of a practical guide for delivering such trainings (Deliverable D4.13 of Task 2)
6. Through WP1 and WP4: the internal and external communication on the project, through the creation of an attractive logo and a public website also offering an intranet (http://www.gender-net.eu; Deliverable D1.1) and the production of material (leaflets, posters, presentations templates and contents, etc.; Deliverable D1.2), and the dissemination of project results through presentations at key conferences and in numerous events at internal, national and European and International level, via a mailing list, and in the final GENDER-NET dissemination and policy conference organised on September 12th 2016 (Milestone MS16 of WP4) as a integral part of the 9th edition of the European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education hosted by France in Paris, in order to reach a wide audience and maximise policy impact.
7. Through WP1 and WP4 again: the strategic widening of the consortium, within the constraints of a limited budget, which led to an additional ministry joining the project as Beneficiary, and to 7 more organisations joining as Observers; and the exploration of possible ways to carry on the GENDER-NET networking and to further develop joint activities beyond the lifetime of the project. The latter effort led several GENDER-NET partners, observers and organisations represented on our Expert Advisory Board, joined by other national/regional research-funding organisations, to develop, in parallel to GENDER-NET activities and under the leadership of CNRS, a proposal in response to the new call topic SwafS-02-2016 opened in 2016 for the creation of an ERA-NET Cofund promoting gender equality in H2020 and the ERA on the basis of the GENDER-NET ERA-NET results. The submitted proposal, entitled GENDER-NET Plus, which reaches a total budget above 11 Million euro, has just been successfully evaluated according to the invitation letter to grant preparation from the EC just received by the project coordinator (Anne Pépin, CNRS) on December 17th 2016.

The main results and foregrounds of the GENDER-NET ERA-NET are described in more details in the following section (4.1.3), and the impact of the project and main dissemination activities and exploitation of results are detailed in section 4.1.4.

Project Results:
Work package 1: Coordination, Management and Dissemination
(Total duration: M1-36), WP1 Leader: CNRS (France)

CNRS led this WP in their capacity as scientific and administrative coordinator to GENDER-NET and succeeded in running an efficient scientific co-ordination as well as administrative management of the activities of the ERA-NET, which enabled the consortium to effectively deliver the project and maximise the added value of the partnership collaboration.

There were 4 Deliverables overall in WP1, all delivered: D1.1 “Project logo and website” (WP1, Task 4); D1.2 “Production of communication and dissemination material” (WP1, Task 4); and two Deliverables, D1.3 “Periodic progress report” (WP1, Task 2) and D1.4 “Final report including future plans” (WP1, Task 2), which were actually wrongfully inscribed as a Deliverables in the DOW, as these were contract requirements, the latter of which we are fulfilling with the current report.

There were 3 Milestones in WP1 which were all reached:
1. MS1 “Kick-off meeting” (WP1, Task 3), was organised at Month 1 (host CNRS, Paris, France);
2. MS2 “Meetings of the Steering Committee and General Assembly” (WP1, Task 3), took place as planned, at Months 6 (host FNRS, Brussels, Belgium), 12 (host RCN, Oslo, Norway), 18 (host CNRS, Paris, France), 24 (host RPF, Protaras, Cyrpus), 30 (host HEA/IRC, Dublin, Ireland) and 36 (host MINECO, Valencia, Spain);
3. MS3 “Entry of new partners” (WP1, Task 5), was materialised by the signature of Amendment request N°1 to the Grant Amendment, with the following results:
o The Ministry of Science, Technology and Space of the State of Israel (MOST) was added as new full beneficiary.
o The Austrian Science Fund (FWF), Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG), KIF Committee for Gender Balance and Diversity in Research in Norway, the Icelandic Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (MESC), the platform for joint Nordic research and research infrastructure cooperation (NordForsk), and the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic (TA CR) were added as new Observers.

Main results are summarized below, per Task.

Task 1: Set up of project management systems - (Month 1-3)
CNRS Responsible

This task included writing and agreeing on the project workplan in association with individual WP workplans, reporting, risk and performance management, management of intellectual property rights. It was carried out successfully by CNRS, in conjunction with WP2, WP3, and WP4 co-Leaders. As no Consortium Agreement was mandatory, the general rules contained in the Grant Agreement, the fact that all GENDER-NET Deliverables were public, and the positive collaborative spirit established within the consortium, have guaranteed the success of the project.

Task 2: Implementation of project management and coordination - (Month 1-36)
CNRS Responsible

This task included day-to-day project management, financial management, monitoring and reporting of activities against the project’s WP work plans, effecting communication across the partnership and with the EC appointed officers, and effecting project closure and delivery of final report.

Day-to-day management was carried out thanks to the full time employment of a European Project Manager at CNRS (Federico Zemborain, then Jeanne Collin), with guidance from the scientific coordinator (Anne Pépin) and support from the CNRS Administrative Management Department.
Financial management: The GENDER-NET Grant Agreement was signed by the EC on December 17th 2013, pre-financing was received by CNRS from EC and distributed to Beneficiaries by March 2014. The EC’s approval of RP1 reports was received by CNRS on April 7th 2016, and the second pre-financing payment received early May 2015 and distributed to Beneficiaries on May 20th 2016. The GENDER-NET Amendment Request N°1 –with revised budget breakdown– was sent to the EC by CNRS on July 11th 2016, received on July 25th 2016, completed on September 8th 2016, and finally signed on October 24th 2016. Following the submitted RP2 reports and current final report, as soon as CNRS receives the final payment and balance calculation from EC, CNRS will proceed with the distribution of remaining funds among partners.
Monitoring and reporting of activities against the project’s WP workplans:
Monitoring: The project work plan was regularly monitored, with necessary adaptation of the Gantt Chart undertaken upon agreement from the General Assembly, and from the Project Officer. Justification for encountered delays in certain tasks and the achievement of certain Deliverables and Milestones have been provided in the two interim reports for RP1 and RP2. For a sound monitoring of the project’s progress, CNRS was systematically invited to WP2, WP3 and WP4 work package and task work meetings. CNRS also monitored the completion of all due Deliverables.
Periodic Reporting: From the onset of the project, CNRS informed the consortium partners about the reporting procedure and timeline, and sent templates and detailed instructions long ahead of time for periodic reporting (narrative and financial) and final reporting. Tailored guidance deemed necessary from the coordinator to a significant number of inexperienced partners.
Effecting communication across the partnership:
Frequent communication was established, in person, by e-mail, phone, Skype and other remote modes, between the coordinator and WP leaders and Task leaders, as well as with the whole partnership. An intranet was set up (a CORE sharepoint space accessible from the homepage of the project’s website www.gender-net.eu) was set up and regularly updated for partners to share and consult project documents.
Communication with the EC appointed officers: CNRS has been in very regular contact with the project officers, by e-mail and phone, as well as in person on several occasions, including the kick-off meeting and final conference and several workshops and dissemination events. Change of PO during RP1 (Isabelle Cavé replacing Luisa Mascia, gone on maternity leave, and L. Mascia returning as of April 2015, but only part-time at first) induced some delays in the resolution of certain pending issues, and the preparation of the GA amendment procedure took significant effort.
Effecting project closure and delivery of final report is being done through this final reporting and follow-up tasks upon receiving feedback from the EC.

Task 3: Organisation & secretariat activities of the Steering Committee and General Assembly meetings (Month 1-36)
CNRS Responsible, with hosting partners

Steering Committee meetings were organised, as planned, immediately prior to the General Assembly meetings planned every six months. The consortium meetings took place at:
• Month 1: Kick-off meeting at CNRS Headquarters in Paris, France, on 21-22 October 2013;
• Month 6: hosted by FNRS on 26-27 March 2014, in Brussels, Belgium;
• Month 12: hosted by RCN on 15-16 October 2014, in Oslo, Norway;
• Month 18: hosted by CNRS on 26 March 2015, in Paris, France;
• Month 24: hosted by RPF on 30 September 2014 in Protaras, Cyprus;
• Month 30: hosted by HEA/IRC on 6 April 2016 in Dublin, Ireland;
• Month 36: hosted by MINECO on 3-4 October 2016 in Valencia, Spain.
An Extraordinary General Assembly, focusing on WP4 and meant to clarify the French MENESR’s involvement and the Swiss WBF’s situation with respect to over-spending, was organised in Paris, on August 31st, 2015, hosted by MENESR.
Minutes have been produced by CNRS and adopted by the consortium. Agendas and lists of participants to all the above meetings, with photos, have been presented in the additional information documents provided with the two periodic reports.

Task 4: External communication and dissemination activities on project - (Month 1-36)
CNRS Responsible, with hosting partners

The aim of this Task was to disseminate and mainstream the outputs and outcomes of the project at a national, European and International level. Two deliverables were due (both in RP1):
• D1.1 Project logo and website (WP1, Task 4): the logo, selected via crown-design, was available at Month 5, and the public website (http://www.gender-net.eu) built via the CNRS website toolkit, was launched at Month 11, along with the intranet.
• D1.2 Production of communication and dissemination material (WP1, Task 4): leaflets, posters (printed on paper, plastic roll-ups, virtual), factsheets, Word and Powerpoint templates featuring the colourful project logo, videos, and many project presentations, were produced.

External Communication: The project logo & graphic charter were used in our online tools (http://igar-tool.gender-net.eu, http://igar-map.gender-net.eu), our published Deliverable Reports, project leaflets or posters, PowerPoint presentations for talks in conferences/colloquia/workshops and other events, Word/PDF documents with specific information for dissemination events.
Each material was regularly updated and latest versions made accessible via the GENDER-NET website, which was frequently updated with news about project activities, photos, videos, and latest news on activities developed by partners and observers and mentioning GENDER-NET.
Since September 2014, website connections statistics indicate an average monthly traffic of roughly 1500-2000 visits, on 5500 to 7500 pages, and from in between 750 and 1000 different visitors. The traffic has continued to progress, with November 2016 registering over 2600 visits from around 1800 unique visitors, and already over 2000 visits as of December 20th, 2016.
Deliverable reports, once validated by the EC, were sent to a professional editor to be reformatted in the same publishable layout. All new releases were then advertised through the GENDER-NET Mailing list (around 1500 subscribers) via a Free Email Marketing Solution (MailChimp).

Dissemination activities: Apart from the final dissemination and policy conference (see below WP4 Task 8), a large number of dissemination activities have been undertaken by the coordinator and project partners over the course of the project, at internal, national and European and international levels, which have been reported upon in the two periodic reports and informed online as part of the current final report.

Liaising: The GENDER-NET project coordinator, as well as other consortium Beneficiaries, Observers and EAB members, have actively liaised and in some instances developed cooperation with key committees, stakeholder organisations and projects, including:
• Helsinki Group on Gender in Research and Innovation (through several of our members)
• ERAC
• H2020 Strategic Configuration Programme Committee
• H2020 Advisory Group on Gender
• H2020 SwafS Advisory Group
• The “gender doers” from the ERA stakeholder platform: NordForsk (became an Observer), EUA, Science Europe (the Working Group on Gender & Diversity launched in 2014 developed its work as a complement to GENDER-NET, as several of its members are part of GENDER-NET, i.e. CNRS, RCN, SRC, FWF, DFG), LERU (Katrien Maes, Chief Policy Officer, was invited to Bern workshops)
• Several FP7-SiS & other H2020-SwafS funded projects, including GenPORT, INTEGER, GENIS LAB, STAGES, GENDERTIME, TRIGGER, EGERA, GENERA, GARCIA, PLOTINA, LIBRA, Equal-IST, HEIRRI, SPARKS, RRI-Tools, HYPATIA, SiS-net and EVIMalaR.
• genderSTE COST targeted policy network (through several of our members)
• EIGE (in given expert advice for the GEAR toolkit on the gender equality plans for RPOs, and presenting GENDER-NET at the SHIFT GEAR launching event on October 20th 2016)
• EPWS (in its annual general assemblies and conferences)
• TAFTIE, the European Association of leading national innovation agencies (e.g. FFG)
• MEPs (invited to our strategic seminar and selected events).

Informing the NETWATCH platform: The project coordination team was initially in contact with the NETWATCH platform, then with the ERA LEARN 2020 platform (https://www.era-learn.eu) which replaced it, updated the GENDER-NET ERA-NET project description, and liaised with the network.

Informing other European online platforms: GENDER-NET coordinator has provided updated information to the GenPORT web portal (http://www.genderportal.eu/projects/promoting-gender-equality-research-institutions-and-integration-gender-dimension-research), and individual Deliverable reports have been registered as well (e.g. http://www.genderportal.eu/resources/gender-net-analysis-report-award-schemes-gender-equality-and-structural-change).

Task 5: Widening the GENDER-NET consortium - (Month 1-36)
CNRS Responsible

CNRS worked actively in reaching to key potential partners to strategically widen the consortium, within the limited budget available. In August 2015, Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) and the Israeli Ministry of Science, Technology and Space (MOST) expressed their will to join as Beneficiaries. Eventually, SFI opted out due to internal reorganisation, but the Israeli Ministry became a full beneficiary on 15 October 2015 (M25) as per Grant Agreement.
Seven new Observers joined and actively participated to meetings: Austrian Science Fund (FWF), Austria; Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG), Austria; Technology Agency of the Czech Republic (TA ČR), Czech Republic; Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (MESC), Iceland; Committee for Gender Balance and Diversity in Research (KIF), Norway; NordForsk, Nordic cooperation on research and research infrastructure; National Science Foundation (NSF), USA.
With respect to additional EAB members, the General Assembly decided to invite experts in an ad hoc manner for specific events, Key science and gender equality policy-makers were targeted and accepted our invitations at workshops, strategic seminar, trainings and final conference.

Task 6: Future plans for developing sustained activities (Month 12-36)
CNRS Responsible

In close link with WP4 Task 6, the consortium explored possibilities to continue the GENDER-NET networking efforts and joint activities beyond the life of the project, “possibly through a targeted ERA-NET-like or another scheme according to provisions made by Horizon 2020”, as written in the DOW. This work mainly led to reflect on:
A possible ERA-NET Cofund scheme:
Call topic H2020-Swafs-02-2016, explicitly dedicated to scaling up the GENDER-NET activities through an ERA-NET Cofund action, was published by the EC in the 2016-2017 SwafS work programme. GENDER-NET partners saw this as a key opportunity for expanding activities and helping Member States reach their ERA Roadmaps’ objectives. CNRS organized a strategic exploratory meeting on April 18-19th 2016 in Brussels for interested GENDER-NET stakeholders and other national/regional funding organisations from across Europe, Canada and the USA. Following this, in parallel to GENDER-NET activities, a proposal entitled GENDER-NET Plus, led by CNRS and involving a large number of GENDER-NET partners and observers as well as new countries and organisations, was therefore prepared to address all call requirements, and submitted in August 2016. On December 16th, project coordinator CNRS received an invitation letter to grant preparation, which revealed that the GENDER-NET Plus proposal had been positively evaluated, thus sowing a concrete realisation of the exploration work developed in this Task.
The promotion of further networking activities with: the Helsinki Group, and possible Future Network of National Representatives (GENDERACTION proposal submitted to the SwafS-08-2016 call topic); Science Europe and its Working Group on Gender & Diversity; the EQ-UNI European Network on Gender Equality in Higher Education; EIGE Network and their new online toolbox, officially launched on Oct. 20th in Brussels.


Work package 2: Gender Equality in Research Institutions through Structural Change
(Total duration: M1-36), WP2 co-Leaders: RCN (Norway) and WBF (Switzerland) with strong involvement of ECU

As per revised Annex 1 of the GENDER-NET Grant Agreement, the overall objective of WP2 was to: exchange best practices through networking activities and the mutual opening of a series of national/regional, global or targeted initiatives/programmes/policies on the promotion gender equality within research institutions through structural change; carry out a joint analysis and impact evaluation of existing initiatives; and accordingly, devise a framework for the implementation of transnational activities.
This objective was reached by WP2 co-leaders RCN and WBF, with strong support of ECU, and with crucial efforts from the coordinator and all GENDER-NET partners and observers who provided data and made important input to WP2-related deliverables and milestones.

WP2 contained 5 Tasks, which were successfully fulfilled, and main results are detailed below. The entire WP2 work was focused on 5 categories or themes that had been predefined in the DoW, as key components of the implementation of gender equality through structural change, i.e.:
• Recruiting, retaining and the advancement of women researchers, including leading positions
• Facilitating in/out-going mobility of women researchers
• Improving work environment, work-life balance and dual careers
• Anchoring gender equality issues at leadership level
• Identifying decision-making structures and procedures at regional/national level

In its duration, WP2 has successfully implemented all tasks, and albeit with some delays, has completed its 4 due Deliverables and reached its 3 Milestones, namely:
- D2.5: Analysis report on existing plans and initiatives at national level, prepared by RCN (Lead beneficiary of Task 2), investigated existing national and regional initiatives undertaken by GENDER-NET project participants to stimulate gender equality and enact structural change with regard to gender equality in research institutions.
- D2.6: Analysis report on existing plans and initiatives in selected research institutions, prepared by WBF (Lead beneficiary of Task 3), summarised research carried out in order to understand the impact of existing national/regional initiatives and award schemes in selected research institutions that aimed to stimulate gender equality and enact structural change. It provided an overview and analysis of existing institutional initiatives and also examined whether methods from institutional initiatives can aid the design of national strategies and initiatives.
- D2.7: Analysis report on existing awards and corresponding stimulatory initiatives, prepared by ECU (Lead beneficiary of Task 4), researched the impact of existing award schemes aimed at creating greater gender equality, and their ability to stimulate gender equality and enact structural change in research institutions.
These 3 joint assessments were conducted in parallel (with a slight delay for D2.6, which partly depended upon D2.5 and D2.7) and, together, formed the basis of future work in GENDER-NET for developing transnational initiatives and indicators on structural change. Delays in actual delivery dates were agreed beforehand with our PO.
- D2.8: Synthesis report on selected structural change initiatives and indicators for monitoring of state-of-play and progress, was a synthesis report based on the 3 Deliverables above, and presented a selection of promising structural change initiatives and made recommendations for transnational actions and common indicators for monitoring the state-of-play and progress, expected to have a significant positive impact on gender equality in research institutions. Change in actual delivery date of D2.8 was agreed with the EC in advance.
- MS4: Three expert workshops to refine analysis of mapping of Tasks 2, 3, and 4, were conducted in Month 12 (October 2014) in Oslo, alongside the project Steering Committee meeting and General Assembly. The workshops, aimed to present first findings, and refine them, brought together GENDER-NET ERA-NET partners, observers and EAB members, and included presentation of scope, methods and initial findings followed by discussion. Participants provided positive feedback and reflections, and also proposed some areas for further analysis.
- MS5: Workshop on criteria for selection of indicators for monitoring of state-of-play and progress. Initially due in RP1 (Month 13) it was conducted jointly with MS6 for better efficiency, in Month 19 (May 11th 2015), in Bern, Switzerland. Change in actual delivery date of MS5 was agreed by GENDER-NET ERA-NET Project Coordinator with the EC in advance.
- MS6: Workshop to identify common elements for transnational implementation on structural change was conducted in Month 19 (11 May 2015) in Bern. Recommendations developed by GENDER-NET ERA-NET partners, observers, EAB members, as well as guest speakers and invited experts at the merged MS5/MS6 workshop formed the basis for work in WP4 Task 2 (Designing and implementing joint gender equality training schemes) and Task 4 (Integrating common indicators for a monitoring of the qualitative achievement of gender equality policies).

All Deliverable reports have been widely disseminated and are available here: http://www.gender-net.eu/spip.php?article55&lang=en. Main results par Task are reported below.

Task 1: Create WP workplan, monitor progress (Month 1-36)
RCN and WBF responsible

During the entire project period, WP2 co-leaders and Task leaders worked together to make sure the objectives of WP2 were reached and all results elaborated in WP2 would have a positive impact on results in other WPs, and in WP4 in particular.
The working method included regular Skype calls to monitor implementation of the WP and operative decision-making, face-to-face meetings to address strategic issues related to the effective implementation of the WP2 objectives and preparation of progress reports (e.g. reports for 6-monthly consortium meetings). Where possible, the face-to-face meetings took place as side-events of GENDER-NET ERA-NET consortium meetings. The GENDER-NET ERA-NET Coordinator has actively supported the WP2 work on Task 1, including participation in activities mentioned above during entire project period.
WP2 also conducted a number of dissemination activities aimed at knowledge transfer and promotion and visibility of the GENDER-NET project (see Table A2 of current report, as well as periodic reports).
Cooperation and mutual understanding developed among WP2 partners will further serve for mutual support and knowledge transfer after the project ends.

Task 2: Performing a joint assessment on the promotion of gender equality through structural change at regional/national level (Month 1-20)
RCN responsible

Completed Deliverables and Milestones:
- Deliverable D2.5 Analysis report on existing plans and initiatives at national level, successfully submitted in Month 18
- Milestone MS4 Expert workshops to refine analysis of mapping of Task 2, conducted in Month 12 in Oslo.
The main goal of WP2 Task 2, i.e. to perform a joint assessment on the promotion of gender equality through structural change at national level, was accomplished by submission of D2.5.
As for methodology, a template was sent out to project partners and observers in January 2014 and by summer 2014, contributions from Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland, Norway, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, the UK and the USA had been collected. Material was then compiled and analysed, feedback from partners and coordinator was incorporated and the report was finalised with recommendations by March 2015.
The material was generally rich as regard to gender equality legislation, plans and regulations and there were some good examples of mechanisms contributing to the implementation of gender equality plans. On the other hand, the material contained relatively few examples of measures targeted at some core elements or preconditions for structural change, specifically measures improving leadership involvement, or "gendering" of mobility schemes and policies. Uptake of structural change would also benefit from funding schemes addressing recruitment and retention of women, mobility, dual careers and work-life balance issues, or or requesting that the above be addressed by applicants’ institutions before receiving funding.
Following up on task 2, RCN contributed to the content and quality of the discussions on criteria and selection of indicators and the possibility of transnational implementation at the MS5/MS6 and workshops in Bern, in May 2015, by inviting Norwegian experts with specific competence in the field of research indicators and gender statistics.

Task 3: Performing a joint assessment on the promotion of gender equality through structural change at institutional level (Month 1-20)
WBF responsible

Completed Deliverables and Milestones:
- Deliverable D2.6 Analysis report on existing plans and initiatives in selected research institutions, successfully submitted in Month 18
- Milestone MS4 Expert workshops to refine analysis of mapping of Task 3, conducted in Month 12 in Oslo.
The main goal of Task 3 in WP2, i.e. to perform a joint assessment on the promotion of gender equality through structural change at institutional level, was accomplished by submission of D2.6.
As for methodology, an online survey was designed and desktop research carried out in order to collect information on institutional action plans, central or decentralised/area-specific institutional initiatives implemented by selected institutions within the framework of existing national/regional initiatives and award schemes undertaken project participants’ countries (in CH, DE, ES, FR, EI, NO and UK) to stimulate gender equality and enact structural change.
Findings showed that a gender-responsive national policy context (e.g. creation of legal/policy frameworks, national initiatives and awards for promoting gender equality in science and technology) is a significant driving force for stimulating gender equality and enacting structural change in research institutions. Another external factor that activates structural change dynamics and builds critical mass is transnational and inter-institutional cooperation between selected institutions, including through EU-funded projects. A summary map of most innovative and promising practices implemented in the 52 selected institutions, classified according to the five key areas, was produced.
WBF hosted the MS5/MS6 and MS10 workshops (conducted on 11-12.05.2015 in Bern, Switzerland) and did the preparatory work for these workshops. In addition to the logistics, the preparatory work included setting of the agenda, programme and organising key speakers. Conceptual work on MS5/MS6 was conducted in close collaboration with Task 2 and Task 4 leaders of WP2, as well as with the GENDER-NET project coordinator.
During the entire project, WP2 Task 3 Team continued to conduct regular working meetings related to the project implementation and monitoring. As part of WP1, a number of extraordinary consultations were also organised with the Head of Euresearch Bern to get assistance and find solutions for outstanding issues related to the amendment to the GENDER-NET GA requested by WBF for including the University of Bern as third party and address budget-related issues.

Task 4: Understanding the impact of award schemes and their ability to stimulate gender equality or enact structural change (Month 1-20)
ECU responsible

Completed Deliverables and Milestones:
- Deliverable D2.7 Analysis report on existing awards and corresponding stimulatory initiatives, successfully submitted in Month 18
- Milestone MS4 Expert workshops to refine analysis of mapping of Task 4, conducted in Month 12 in Oslo.
Task 4 in WP2 had a principle aim of exploring a range of national/regional award schemes that recognise individual higher education/research institutions and/or departments in terms of gender equality, which aim to affect the institutional environment for academic researchers with respect to the representation and retention of women researchers, and which can be expected to have some impact on structural change.
As for methodology, following desk research and discussion with GENDER-NET, the following 8 schemes were selected for analysis: Athena SWAN (UK and Ireland), EC HR Excellence in Research (Europe), Gender Equality Award (Norway), Gender Equity in the Workplace Award (Australia), The Pleiades Awards (Australia), Project Juno (UK and Ireland), Total E-quality Award (Germany), Proposed gender equality award (Iceland). In addition to desk research, a total of 12 interviews were conducted between May and August 2014 with awarded institutions and with organisations sponsoring these awards.
Based on the research, it was concluded that the following elements in award schemes had evidence of significant impact on structural change: Award focussed on gender; Specific to higher education and research; Significant academic involvement/lead; System of progression (levels, renewals); Requires departmental action; Requires action planning in relation to gender; Ongoing monitoring of progress and impact; Requires gender disaggregated data.
The research concluded that an adequately resourced award scheme could act as a motivator to change, an effective framework and help embed work. D2.7 recommended that any transnational award should include the following elements: 1) Guiding principles rooted in common issues across the ERA, 2) Continuous progression and review, 3) Institutional and departmental levels across all disciplines, 4) Academic lead involvement, 5) Action planning based on self-assessment, 6) Culture-change approach, 7) Peer review assessment.

Task 5: Designing and developing common best practice for a transnational context (Month 18-36)
RCN and WBF responsible, with strong input from ECU

Completed Deliverables and Milestones:
- D2.8: Synthesis report on selected structural change initiatives and indicators for monitoring of state-of-play and progress, submitted at Month 31.
- MS6 Workshop to identify common elements for transnational implementation on structural change held jointly with MS5 Workshop on criteria for selection of indicators for monitoring of state-of-play and progress (11.05.2015 in Bern, Switzerland)
The overall objective of Task 5 was to build on results of Tasks 2, 3 and 4 to design and develop core elements for transnational strategic initiatives that could be piloted and implemented in WP4. This objective was achieved through conduction of MS5/MS6 workshops and submission of D2.8. Another important element of Task 5 was that WP2 partners acted as reference point for related activities implemented in WP4.
The D2.8 report attempts to define some core elements of transnational strategic initiatives. Three areas are highlighted: research funding, researcher mobility and leadership. These areas illustrate two core elements vital for improvement: first, essential elements for further progress are not yet followed up by appropriate measures; and second, there are national examples with solid proof of a high impact factor, but the successful approach is not yet transnationally adopted.
The MS6 Workshop was implemented together with MS5 and brought together 38 GENDER-NET participants as well as guest speakers and invited experts. Invited experts representing various stakeholders made important contribution to group discussions and overall workshop success.
The MS5/MS6 Workshop’s objectives to develop criteria for selection of indicators for monitoring of state of play and progress on structural change and to identify common elements for transnational implementation on structural change were achieved.
Group discussions, facilitated by an expert external facilitator (Maria Scordialos, Living Wholeness Ltd), proposed quantitative and qualitative descriptors to measure structural change to improve gender equality in research. In addition, one group discussion was held to identify potential projects for transnational implementation for improving gender equality in research.
One aspect of the workshop MS6 was to explore the desirability of a joint transnational award scheme, based on the recommendations of D2.7. It was recognised that an award scheme could be a catalyst for addressing structural issues on gender equality and if it linked to research funding, could have a significant impact. There was also consideration that to create and maintain such a scheme requires a considerable level of resources. One starting point could be to use the Athena SWAN award framework and refine it for a transnational context. These findings were used in the development of work in WP4 Task 3 on a possible joint Award scheme.
From MS5/MS6, it was agreed that the focus should be on qualitative descriptors because there were already many quantitative descriptors (e.g. national statistics, Eurostat, She Figures, EIGE index, and undergoing work by the Working Group on Gender & Diversity at Science Europe). These recommendations formed the basis for the work developed in WP4 Task 4 (Integrating common indicators for a monitoring of the qualitative achievement of gender equality policies).
As for transnational activities, the workshop recommended developing a methodology for pilot leadership trainings to be conducted in those selected GENDER-NET countries which did not yet have a programme promoting structural change. The trainings should be tailored to their communities. These recommendations formed the basis for the work developed in WP4, Task 2 (Designing and implementing joint gender equality training schemes). For more details, please see section on WP4 below.


Work package 3: Gendering Research Contents and Programmes
(Total duration: Months 1-36), WP3 co-Leaders: MINECO (Spain) & CIHR (Canada)

The objective of WP3 – which was co-led by MINECO and CIHR, with strong involvement of CNRS, participation of FNRS, and later involvement of HEA/IRC – was to exchange best practices on the integration of the gender dimension in research and innovation contents and programmes, building on the mutual opening, through networking activities, of national and European initiatives on the use of sex and gender analysis in disciplines beyond social science and humanities.
WP3 collected information on national policies and programmes Integrating Gender Analysis into Research (which we label IGAR); developed a comprehensive description of existing programmes; produced a comparative analytical report; designed manuals for adapting the common best practices to transnational contexts; and developed a strategic framework for implementing transnational activities.

There were 4 Deliverables due in WP3:
1. D3.9 (Compendium of existing national and regional initiatives on the integration of the gender dimension in research contents including country and institution facts sheets)
2. D3.10 (Comparative analysis report on gendering research contents)
3. D3.11 (Manuals with guidelines on gendering research contents)
4. D3.12 (Elevating Promising Practice: Potential Transnational Actions for Integrating Gender Analysis into Research)

And 4 Milestones as well:
1. MS7 (Data/information collecting tools disseminated to participating countries and institutions with on-going programmes)
2. MS8 (Expert workshop on comparative analysis of national/regional policies and programmes on the gender dimension in research contents)
3. MS9 (Two workshops delivered with recommendations on the gendering of research contents for funding agencies, evaluators, curricula development)
4. MS10 (Workshop to identify common elements for transnational implementation and criteria for indicators for monitoring of state-of-play and progress on the integration of the gender dimension in research contents)

Main results are reported below per Task, and more detailed Task reports can be found in the first and second periodic reports.


Task 1: Create WP work plan, monitor progress (Months 1-36)
MINECO and CIHR responsible

WP3 co-leads and task leads focused on the definition of a rationale for a common coordination strategy and devised a work plan to ensure that all activities be carried out in a timely manner. To ensure effective coordination of Tasks during this period, while providing oversight for the key activities and deliverables, WP3 co-leads adopted the following coordination approach:
• Provide oversight for WP3 overall, including the respective tasks’ progress and time lines.
• Monitor progress towards WP3 outputs (milestones/deliverables) against the work plan.
• Facilitate smooth communication and information sharing with WP3 Task leads and participants, including effective communication between WP3 and other GENDER-NET WPs participants
• Organise and establish the agenda for WP3 meetings
• Compile six-monthly and any other progress reports prepared by WP Task Leaders and provide oversight to ensure the successful completion of objectives and tasks, as well as interim and final reporting on WP3.
A significant number of WP3 coordination and work meetings were organised, either remotely or in person, taking advantage as much as possible of other scheduled events (e.g. biannual consortium meetings, workshops, etc.), which have all been listed in the two interim reports.

Task 2: Develop data/information collection tools on national/regional policies, programmes, plans and strategies integrating gender analysis in research contents, collect the existing data, create a compendium and produce a comparative analysis report (Months 1-18)

• Sub-task 2a: Developing data/information collection tools (Month 1-10)
CNRS and CIHR Responsible
MS7 Data/information collecting tools disseminated to participating countries and institutions with on-going programmes: co-led by CNRS and CIHR, was achieved at Month 10.
A survey questionnaire was designed by co-Leaders CIHR and CNRS, which objectives were: a) to capture successful national and regional policies, programmes, plans, and strategies that facilitate the integration of sex and gender analysis into research (IGAR) – especially outside humanities and social sciences, b) to identify gaps for which the GENDER-NET project could provide support.
The survey, developed with input from partners and EAB members (EU-US Gendered Innovations Program Director Londa Schiebinger in particular), covered the following areas:
1. General Information on respondents
2. Policies and strategies aimed at integrating sex/gender analysis in research
3. Research funding programmes fostering the integration of sex/gender analysis in research
4. Guidelines and training materials for applicants
5. Guidelines/training for grant proposal reviewers
6. Recommendations and/or models for university curricula development in scientific and technological fields (other than humanities and social sciences)
7. Transnational activities
8. Additional information
Areas 2 to 6 were considered the 5 core areas of analysis for work developed in WP3.
Technical help was also provided by FNRS to develop an online survey (not foreseen initially) which was tried and tested, and eventually launched mid-July 2014 (through the following link: http://www.surveygizmo.co.uk/s3/1683565/Gender-Net-Survey-June-2014) to a large number of national and regional organisations, including all GENDER-NET partners and observers, Science Europe and TAFTIE member organisations, members of the ERA-related Helsinki Group, key organisations in North America (e.g. NIH).
The survey dissemination plan instilled a positive collaborative approach among GENDER-NET partners and also stimulated additional collaborative relations with organisations not initially in GENDER-NET but that became engaged in the project, such as new Observers FWF and FFG.


• Sub-task 2b: Collecting data/information and producing a comprehensive description of existing national/regional initiatives aimed at fostering the integration of sex and gender into research content (Month 3-15)
CNRS and CIHR Responsible
40 national organisations from 22 countries have answered the survey, including 8 Ministries, 23 research-funding organisations (RFOs), 2 research-performing organisations (RPOs), 2 organisations that are both RFO and RPO, and 3 others. 18 of the 40 responding organisations were members of the GENDER-NET extended Consortium, 11 respondents were RFOs/RPOs involved in the Science Europe Working Group on Gender & Diversity, 7 organisations have declared being represented on the Helsinki Group on Gender in Research and Innovation, and only one of the TAFTIE members (funding agencies for applied research and innovation in Europe) answered the GENDER-NET survey: the Austrian FFG.
D3.9 Compendium of existing national and regional initiatives on the integration of the gender dimension in research contents, including countries factsheets was delivered at Month 18, with slight delay, due to issues encountered in sub-Task 2a, and unforeseen efforts needed to obtain clarification from a number of respondents regarding their answers to the survey. Main results of D3.9 are the following:
1) Successful National Examples:
• Only 16 out of 40, i.e. 40%, have or follow a policy or specific strategy aimed at integrating sex and gender analysis into research content.
• 4 of the above organisations do not have funding programmes for research.
• 11 responding organisations, from 9 countries, currently have or follow a policy or specific IGAR strategy, and also have some kind of policy requiring applicants to specify whether they are considering sex/gender in their research designs.
• 9 out of these 11 organisations provide guidelines and/or training materials/workshops to assist applicants with IGAR. In addition, 2 organisations also have developed some sort of guidelines or training materials even though they do not have any IGAR policy or strategy.
• There are 6 organisations, which come from only 4 countries (Austria’s BMWFW, FWF, FFG; Canada’s CIHR; Ireland’s IRC; Spanish MINECO) which declare having guidelines and/or training materials/workshops to assist evaluators in reviewing the sex/gender components of research proposals. These 6 organisations actually cover all the following 4 areas: policies and strategies, research-funding programmes, guidelines and trainings for applicants, as well as guidelines and trainings for reviewers.

2) National Gap Areas/Challenges
• Only 16 organisations out of the 40, coming from 9 out of the 22 responding countries, currently have a policy or specify strategy aimed at IGAR, while 24 national organisations, coming from 18 countries, do not have such a strategy/policy.
• Among the 24 national organisations currently without a policy/strategy, 8 declare they do plan to introduce one.
• Only 11 out of 40 organisations have some sort of guidelines/trainings for applicants and/or for reviewers. Most survey respondents state they would welcome assistance with this.
• Among organisations which do have policies/strategies/programmes, some have also mentioned that they had encountered some challenges/obstacles in implementation, due to e.g. lack of awareness of applicants, lack of expertise/understanding of issues and research benefits at stake (especially in fields outside SSH), or a diversity policy in which gender is just one among other themes
• Only one organisation declared having recommendations or models for university curricula development in scientific & technological fields. However, 30 out of the 37 organisations that answered “No” specify that they do not have any responsibility for university-level curricula.
• A limited number of universities developing such gendered curricula have been mentioned by the respondents. This aspect has been further addressed in WP3 Task 3.
The resulting GENDER-NET Compendium and fact sheets were pioneering efforts at international level documenting all key existing national-level policies, programmes, strategies and initiatives on the promotion of IGAR. And D3.9 has provided a sound basis for all following WP3 tasks.


• Sub-task 2c: Producing a comparative analysis report (Month 12-18)
MINECO and FNRS Responsible
The D3.9 compendium was analysed to identify common threads at national and regional levels, and a comparative analysis report (D3.10) was produced by MINECO, with support from FNRS, CNRS and CIHR. The D3.10 report was meant to serve as an inventory of successful national/regional policies, programmes, plans and strategies, and as a core reference document for developing common criteria, guidelines, recognition schemes, and other implementing tools.
To move forward on developing this comparative analysis report, an expert workshop (MS8 Workshop on Comparative analysis of national/regional policies and programmes on the gender dimension in research contents) was organised on 26-27 February 2015 (Month 17) in Brussels, and brought together key stakeholder representatives, as well as experts on IGAR.
The workshop was dedicated to the following key components:
• Presenting the main findings of the Compendium (D3.9) focusing on success factors in case of proactive countries (good practices) and barriers in case of relatively inactive countries.
• Sharing and discussing the topic of criteria and success factors in public policies towards the integration of gender in the contents of research. A panel composed of international experts on IGAR was invited to provide input.
To this open part of the workshop, GENDER-NET invited representatives/appointments from EU institutions and other national institutions which we thought strategically interesting for the project, including Helsinki Group members, DG RTD, European Parliament Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality, European Parliament Committee of Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE), DG G Economic Affairs and Competitiveness (Council of the EU), ERC, LERU, EARTO, etc.
During the restricted part of the workshop, results were gathered from GENDER-NET partners, observers and experts in the following areas: Identifying successes and challenges, Identifying key indicators to measure success, Identifying elements for the comparative analysis, Identifying ideas for joint transnational activities.

D3.10: Comparative analysis report on gendering research contents
The structure and a summary of the results of the comparative analysis report contains the following key elements:
1) Introduction setting the background and rationale for D3.10, including definitions and concepts.
2) Comparative section where the data from the compendium is analysed. The 40 respondent organisations are analysed and compared following 2 main dimensions: i) type of organisation (ministry, RFO, RPO, etc.), ii) proactivity level on IGAR regarding the implementation of measures in the 5 core survey areas.
• 2.1) Results by type of organisation: 8 respondent Ministries (20% out of the total sample), 23 RFOs (58% out of the total sample), 21 out of them from European countries and 2 of them from Canada. There were also 2 RFO/RPOs (5% out of the total sample). Only 4 national RPOs responded (10% out of the total sample). And finally, 3 respondent organisations were included in the “Others” category (7,5 % out of the total sample)
• 2.2) Results by level of proactivity: respondent organisations are categorized according to their proactivity level in implementing IGAR. 9 organisations (22,5% of respondents) are categorized as proactive (at least 3 of the 5 core survey areas), 9 organisations (23% of the sample) (1 or 2 of the 5 core survey areas) are categorized as relatively active, and 22 organizations (55%) are relatively inactive (no measures in any of the 5 core areas).
• 2.3) Relation between the level of proactivity and the type of organisations. No consistent relation between these two dimensions was found.
• 2.4) Comparisons with regards to the particular measures reported by the organisations, their level of implementation, whether they have indicators or impact evaluation of certain measures, etc. Analysis mainly focuses on approaches and patterns found within and between the 5 core survey areas.
3) Successes and Promising Practices identified from the responses to the survey on the ways in which organisations are enforcing IGAR. The examples presented serve as an inventory of cases which can be applicable to other contexts (transferability) and which provide valuable lessons and insights into new ways of integrating the gender dimension into research contents.
4) Barriers and Challenges that have been identified by organisations as motives to their lack of implementation or success of different measures aimed at IGAR in their own contexts.
5) Case Studies: 3 cases from the respondent organisations have been chosen for being good examples regarding the general objective of integrating the gender dimension in their own research funding systems: CIHR, IRC and NIH.
6) Main conclusions identified in the comparative analysis.
An interactive map presenting D3.9 and D3.10 results in a picturesque and practical way, i.e. sorting results per country, per type of organisation, per organisation, and per level of proactivity, was developed by CNRS, MINECO, FNRS and a subcontracted website developer, and is accessible via the GENDER-NET project website and directly through here: http://igar-map.gender-net.eu/en/map
These D3.9 and D3.10 baseline documents have provided a sound basis for all following WP3 tasks and WP4 tasks related to IGAR.


Task 3: Designing support material for adapting common best practices to transnational contexts (Month 13-36)
MINECO and CIHR Responsible

This task was designed to promote the exchange of best practices on the integration of the gender dimension in research and innovation contents and programmes (re-labelled IGAR) and produce supporting tools. For this task, an expert workshop (MS9) was organised in order to work around recommendations on IGAR for funding agencies, evaluators, and curricula development.

• MS9 Workshops:
On the 24-25 March took place at CNRS Offices in Paris the 2 workshops with Recommendations on the gendering of research contents for funding agencies, evaluators, and curricula development. The approach and structure of the workshop were as follow:
o Workshop 1: Recommendations on the gendering of research contents for Funding Agencies and reviewers/evaluators. The following areas were discussed and analysed:
- Work sessions to develop Training modules and guidelines tailored to the different calls for proposals and related supporting documents
- Work sessions to develop Training modules and guidelines for research grant proposal reviewers/evaluators on how to assess the significance of sex and/or gender in proposals
o Workshop 2: Recommendations on the gendering of research contents for curricula development in scientific and technological fields.
- Work sessions to develop Recommendations and models for curricula development in scientific and technological fields (other than humanities and social sciences) including multi-disciplinary/interdisciplinary approaches
- Planning for implementing transnational activities on the gendering of research contents for funding agencies, evaluators, curricula development.

• D3.11) Manuals with guidelines on gendering research contents: for i) funding agencies; ii) evaluators of grant proposals; iii) curricula development; iv) indicators for monitoring of state-of-play and progress
D3.11 is presented in 4 sections as follows:
1) General Introduction to GENDER-NET and definitions and concepts related to sex and gender in research, as well as normative/regulatory framework, mainly at European level.
2) Manuals with Guidelines on Integrating Gender Analysis into Research (IGAR), providing guidelines and checklists on IGAR to assist national/regional RFOs, grant applicants and peers reviewers/evaluators with the know-how to integrate sex and/or gender considerations into research (policies, programmes, projects). For RFOs, recommendations are provided in the following key areas of the funding system: Policy and/or strategy; High level support and leadership at institutional level; Research funding programme; Strategic training, Dissemination materials and awareness-raising activities; Gender specific research; Monitoring and evaluation; Budget and resources; Supplementary and/or eligible funding. For applicants and peer reviewers/evaluators, the key guidelines follow the research cycle: Research approach, Literature review, Research questions and hypotheses, Research methods, Ethics, and Dissemination/Knowledge translation, and also suggest in which sections of the H2020 application form these recommendations should be integrated. Additionally, it presents several examples which seek to provide elements of reflection and concrete cases of the relevance of IGAR (in H2020 societal challenges and other areas of interest), as well as useful references suitable to RFOs, applicants and/or peer reviewers/evaluators.
3) Recommendations and models for Integrating Gender Analysis into University Curricula (IGAUC): These recommendations are important given that HEIs are crucial to avoid generating and transmitting gender-biased knowledge. IGAUC is oriented to guide students in developing IGAR skills to identify gender biases in research, and adequately apply IGAR methods in knowledge production and transfer. Recommendations are provided at HEIs level and/or national level. The last subsection presents 7 cases of experiences related to IGAUC, coming from 6 universities (5 European and one in the U.S.) and a Network of professors and scientists: Charité University Hospital of Berlin, TU Berlin, TU Braunschweig, University of Valencia, Brown University, University of Barcelona, and the Women's & Gender Research Network NRW (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany). The first 4 cases are existing programmes at European universities, and the three last ones are examples of inspiring initiatives aimed at supporting the promotion of IGAUC at different levels.
4) Relevant indicators for monitoring of state-of-play and progress to facilitate evaluation of the integration of gender analysis into research: The last section of the report proposes a set of main and complementary indicators aimed at supporting policy makers, RFOs and HEIs in the monitoring and evaluation of IGAR and IGAUC goals, as a way of measuring advancement and change.

In the framework of Task 3, an innovative on-line tool (http://igar-tool.gender-net.eu) and introductory video on IGAR (available at the same web site) were also developed by MINECO, CNRS and a subcontracted website developer, to assist RFOs and RPOs as well as researchers and peers reviewers/evaluators with the know-how to integrate sex and gender considerations into policies, programmes, and projects, and to raise awareness about the importance of sex and gender in research and innovation.
D3.11 is available in its edited format at the GENDER-NET deliverables website: http://www.gender-net.eu/IMG/pdf/GENDER-NET_D3-10_-_Comparative_analysis_of_existing_national_initiatives_on_the_integration_of_the_gender_dimension_in_research_contents.pdf


Task 4: Develop a strategic framework for implementing transnational strategic activities (M18-36)
HEA and RCN Responsible

Task 4 of WP3 was aimed at identifying the core elements of a framework for implementing transnational strategic activities and monitoring common indicators. The task was carried out in close collaboration with WP4, and was designed to trigger Task 5 of WP4 (Implement a joint strategy for the gendering of research contents and programmes).
A workshop related to this task (MS10) was organized to identify common elements for transnational implementation and criteria for indicators for monitoring of state-of-play and progress on the integration of the gender dimension in research contents (due Month 18). It was successfully reached with minimal delay on May 12th, 2015 (Month 19), as it was purposely organised jointly with WP2 Milestones MS5 and MS6 held in Bern, Switzerland) in order to maximize project efficiency. Several key experts were invited (Anne Therese Lotherington, UiT Arctic University of Norway, on qualitative IGAR indicators; Katrien Maes, LERU, regarding LERU’s upcoming paper on GRI; Roberta Pattono, DG RTD, regarding upcoming SHE Figures and new IGAR indicator).
The deliverable/output associated to this task was report D3.12, entitled “Elevating Promising Practice: Potential Transnational Actions for Integrating Gender Analysis into Research” (renamed following the GA amendment procedure).
The report comprised an introductory section, which defined IGAR (Integrating Gender Analysis into Research) and placed it in the context of the ERA roadmap, and was followed by two main sections:
1) Synthesis of ‘Promising Practices’ at national/institutional level, based on work developed in Deliverables D3.9, D3.10 and D3.11.
2) Core Elements of a Framework for Implementation of Transnational Strategic Activities and Monitoring of Common Indicators on IGAR: Data; Policy and coordination; Training and awareness; Funding and programmes; Expertise and information-sharing/dissemination; Engagement; Awards/Prizes.

Key S&T results of Task 4:
• This task and the wider work package (WP3) brought a much-needed focus to the integration of sex/gender analysis into research contents (IGAR), or the lack thereof. IGAR (as well as gender equality) is a key implementation priority (No.4) within the ERA Roadmap 2015-2020, which notes that “the gender dimension in research content is commonly overlooked”
• The synthesis carried out as part of this task provides evidence for a range of promising practices across Europe in relation to IGAR. These promising practices span national policies and strategies, legislation, research funding programmes within jurisdictions, scientific peer review and evaluation and the Integration of Sex/Gender Analysis into University Curricula (IGAUC). At the same time, the ‘intelligence’ gathered by GENDER-NET illustrates very starkly how far Europe has to go as a whole to embed a comprehensive framework of practice for IGAR.
• When considered in the context of the ERA roadmap, this evidence has strong potential impact as it helps to deliver on a priority need, as articulated by the roadmap to ‘draw attention to key areas where action is likely to pay most dividends for the majority of national research and innovation systems.’ The data gathered by GENDER-NET will provide a diverse range of actors within European research and innovation systems insights into promising practices and how these might be applied locally. This is particularly important for the newer member countries of the European Union, and will help to catalyse and gradually harmonise a consistent level of good practice across the union.


Work package 4: Strategic Transnational Activities and Policies
(Total duration: Months 12-36), WP4 Leader: CNRS (France) and MENESR (France)

The aim of WP4 was to implement strategic joint activities and policies for the promotion of: a) gender equality in research institutions with an aim to increase the number of RPOs and RFOs developing and implementing gender equality plans or equivalent initiatives; b) the integration of gender analysis in research contents and programmes (IGAR).
All 8 Tasks of WP4 were carried out from Month 20 to 36 (15/06/2015 to 14/10/2016), except for Task 1 which had started in RP1. All 4 WP4 Deliverables were completed, and submitted in M36:
• D4.13–Manual on joint gender equality training scheme (WP4, Task 2)
• D4.14–Framework and methodology to set up joint award/Incentive on gender policies in research institutions (WP4, Task 3)
• D4.15–Publish first joint monitoring report on gender equality indicators (WP4, Task 4)
• D4.16–Publish joint report on best practices on gendering research contents and programmes, comprising results from Tasks 5 & 6 (WP4, Task 5/6).

WP4 has also completed the 7 planned milestones (MS):
• MS11–Workshop on joint gender equality training scheme planning (WP4, Task 2), MS12–Workshop on gender Award/incentive planning (WP4, Task 3) and MS14–Workshop for the preparation of the Strategic seminar on the implementation of the gendering of research contents and programmes (WP4, Task 5), were organised together in Month 24
• MS13–Workshop on the monitoring of gender equality indicators (WP4, Task 4) was organised at M28.
• MS14–Workshop for the preparation of the Strategic seminar on the implementation of the gendering of research contents and programmes (WP4, Task 5) was organised at M28.
• MS15– List of identified further transnational and joint activities, was finalised at M36.
• MS16–Final dissemination and policy conference (WP4, Task 8) was organised in M35.
• New MS17–Strategic seminar on the implementation of the gendering of research contents and programmes and its monitoring (WP4, Task 5) was organised in M31.

Main results per Task are presented below.

Task 1: Create WP workplan, monitor progress (Month 12-36)
MENESR and CNRS Responsible

WP4 Workplan was fully settled following the Extraordinary General Assembly meeting held on August 31st 2015 in Paris, in accordance with deadlines for providing deliverables and reaching milestones, and was reviewed to include necessary updates, in consultation Task Leaders.
In addition to regular Skype or phone calls and e-mail exchange, over a dozen, overall, of face-to-face meetings between WP4 co-Leads and Task Leaders were organised to ensure the sound implementation of all planned objectives. Whenever possible, these work meetings took place as side events of GENDER-NET ERA-NET consortium meetings or Workshops.


Task 2: Designing and implementing joint gender equality training schemes (Month 20-36)
WBF and CNRS responsible, with very strong involvement from ECU

The aim of this task, on the basis of the best most promising practices identified in WP2, was to devise strategic joint training schemes on gender equality and structural change. The priority target was top-level and decision-making higher education and research personnel. Less advanced partner and EU countries, with respect to the uptake of gender equality measures in research institutions, were to be the primary of the training schemes.
Following Task 2 MS11 workshop held in Cyprus on September 29th 2015, it was agreed that the pilot gender equality trainings would be organized in the two countries within the GENDER-NET consortium which did not yet have a national programme promoting gender equality: Cyprus (pilot trainings delivered in Larnaca on June 9-10th 2016 – Month 32) and Slovenia (piloted trainings delivered in Ljubljana on June 2-3rd 2016 – Month 32).
A dedicated Task Force, constituted with ECU, CNRS, WBF, MESS, RPF and MENESR decided upon the following two-fold scheme, targeted at two distinct audiences:
• Seminar 1 (developed by CNRS): short and formal political session for the country’s high level research policy-makers, e.g. minister, university rectors, heads of national research organizations, to gain the commitment and engagement of high-level individuals in advancing gender equality within the sector. Contents:
o Opening by a local high level research policy-maker (in Slovenia: Maja Makovec Brenči, Slovenian Minister of Education, Science and Sport; in Cyprus: Dora Chimonidou, President, Conference of Heads of Research Centres) – 10 min
o Introduction to unconscious bias on gender and science (in Slovenia: Catherine Thinus-Blanc, CNRS Senior Researcher Emeritus in Cognitive Psychology, Cognitive Psychology Laboratory, CNRS-Aix Marseille Université, France; in Cyprus: Virginie Bonnot, Associate Professor, Deputy Director of the Psychology Institute, Laboratory of Social Psychology, Paris Descartes University, France) – 20-25 min
o Inspiring testimony from a top academic leader (Champion) sharing his/her experience on the implementation of a GEP (in Slovenia: Doris Wastl-Walter, Vice Rector for Quality Management of the University of Bern, Switzerland; in Cyprus: Nigel Seaton, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of Abertay University, UK, Athena SWAN Award) – 20-25 min
o Recommendations and tools from GENDER-NET (by coordinator Anne Pépin) – 15 min
o Q&A – 15-25 min
o Lunch & Discussion
• Seminar 2 (developed by ECU): longer workshop (about 4 hours) for HR and research officers (e.g. Deans, Department Heads) within universities and RPOs, i.e. individuals who will introduce structural change programmes, to provide them with practical ideas of where they can start their gender equality plan. Contents of the trainings, entirely delivered by ECU (Gary Loke and Gemma Tracey):
o Introduction & getting started (Introduction to facilitators, and to GENDER-NET project, Seminar aims) – 15 min
o Section 1: Gender equality in context (EU context for work on gender equality; Gender equality: picture of hosting country) – 45 min
o Section 2: Why gender equality is important (Fairness, The economic case for gender equality, The research quality case for gender equality) – 45 min
o Refreshment break – 15 min
o Section 3: Exploring gender bias (Exploring the conscious and unconscious biases that create inequality: Bias in recruitment, Exploring unconscious bias, Understanding structural sexism, Examining conscious bias; Taking action to reduce bias: example from GENDER-NET partners) – 60 min
o Section 4: What can your organisation do to advance gender equality (Exploring change interventions to advance gender equality; Presentations of local initiatives on gender equality (in Slovenia: Nina Pohleven, National Institute of Chemistry, Project Manager from the H2020 PLOTINA project; in Cyprus: Ioannis Ioannides from the Electricity Authority of Cyprus, and Anna Michaelidou from the Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics); Next steps) – 60 min
o Close & Lunch
RPF and MESS were responsible for planning relevant practicalities for both events, inviting attendees, and including the cultural specificities / cross-cultural matters in the trainings.
These formats, contents and speakers were well received in both pilot settings. One key learning from the training sessions is that for a transnational training programme there is a need for significant tailoring of the programme to make it meaningful in each country. Particular consideration needs to be given to the specific drivers for change in each country, as this enables those delivering the training to make a stronger case for engagement towards structural change.
Deliverable D4.13 (Manual on joint gender equality training scheme) presents the format, agendas, materials and learning from the pilot sessions, with practical recommendations.


Task 3: Drawing and Implementing common criteria to establish joint Award/Incentive on gender equality/gendered research for institutions (Month 20-35)
MINECO and ECU responsible

Based on WP2 and WP3 findings and or discussion on the impact of awards/incentives on structural change and on the gender dimension in research, respectively, Task 3 of WP4 aimed to explore possibilities for establishing a joint Award or whatever instrument would be best adapted to transnational context.
To this effect, several meetings were held between CNRS, MINECO, ECU and, at times, MENESR, and a Milestone workshop (MS12) was organised in Cyprus in September 2015 (Month 24).
MS12 Workshop on gender Award/incentive planning:
During this workshop, participants/project partners as well as observers analysed the impact of awards and incentives on both structural change to promote gender equality, and IGAR, with the aim of establishing recommendations for developing a framework for a transnational award or a similar instrument. The participants (around 30) discussed the methodology and framework of this instrument, as well as the contents of a scheme which would cover the two above-cited areas.
Within this workshop there were 2 presentations: 1) structure of the Athena SWAN award by Gary Loke and Ruth Gilligan, partners form ECU, UK, and 2) HR Excellence in Research award by Irmela Brach (EC, DG Research & Innovation, ERA Policy & Reform). These two presentations highlighted the lessons learnt from implementing award schemes, identifying their potentialities.
Four different streams were discussed:
Awards focussed on promoting structural change on gender equality:
- Stream 1: Should there be an award for RFOs on how they are promoting structural change on gender equality in research institutions?
- Stream 2: Should there be an award for RPOs on how they are promoting structural change on gender equality in their institution?

Awards focussed on promoting the gendering of research content and in the curriculum:
- Stream 3: Should there be an award for RFOs on how they are promoting the gendering of research content and in the curriculum?
- Stream 4: Should there be an award for RPOs on how they are promoting the gendering of research content and in the curriculum?

The associated Deliverable was D4.14-Framework and methodology to set up joint Award/Incentive on gender policies in research institutions (due Month 35, submitted at Month 36).

As a result of the MS12 workshop, follow-up work meetings between Task participants, and with the European Commission, Deliverable D4.14 presents a framework for an award scheme to promote both structural change for gender equality and the integration of gender analysis into research content (IGAR). The document is structured into four main different sections:
- General Introduction describing the context within the GENDER-NET project for the development of the framework, its methodology and target audience.
- Rationale and Principles of the proposed award scheme, describing both the importance of gender equality in structural change and that of the integration of sex and gender analysis in research (IGAR). A set of principles is presented: the scheme will recognise and reward those institutions which demonstrate a firm commitment to addressing structural barriers to gender equality in research, and on IGAR, through rigorous analysis and the implementation of policies and practices within their own institutions. The proposed principles have been adapted from the Athena SWAN charter award.
- Structure and Categories of the award also for both schemes. These categories or levels of the proposed award scheme are bronze, silver and gold, depending on the level of development of the institutional change and IGAR policies and actions. Also criteria for both schemes are described to guide RFOs and RPO) to advance institutional change and IGAR. The last section is dedicated to the operational framework in terms of the ownership and management, and the evaluation instruments.

The submission of this Deliverable has encountered a slight delay of one month (M36 instead of M35), due to the fact that the day following the 9th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education (September 15th 2916) was taken as an opportunity to discuss the IGAR parts of this D4.14 with EAB member Londa Schiebinger, at CNRS Headquarters.

D4.14 will be available shortly in its edited format through the GENDER-NET Deliverables webpage: http://www.gender-net.eu/spip.php?article55&lang=en


Task 4: Integrating common indicators for a monitoring of the qualitative achievement of gender equality policies (Month 20-35)
ECU and MENESR responsible, with support from CNRS and RCN

Task 4 of WP4 aimed to create a set of indicators measuring the qualitative impact/achievement of gender equality policies within research institutions, and at an institutional level across Europe, based on work already carried out in WP2 on the five key themes which should be addresse for enacting structural change: 1) Decision making structures and procedures; 2) Anchoring at leadership level, 3) Improving work-life balance, 4! Recruiting, retention and advancement of researchers, 5) Mobility.

This task built on the MS5 workshop held in May 2015 in Bern (Month 19). A meeting between CNRS, MENESR and ECU followed, in October 2015 in Paris (Month 25), to do further work in the development of common indicators for monitoring the qualitative achievement of gender equality policies. And a workshop (MS13) was then organised in January 2016 (Month 28) in Ljubljana, Slovenia, for GENDER-NET partners, observers, expert advisory board members and invited speakers to test the possible indicators proposed by ECU and MENESR.
These indicators were partly modelled along the report “Indicators for promoting and monitoring responsible research and innovation” from the EC Expert Group on Policy Indicators for Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), which grouped indicators into 3 categories: process, outcome, and perception.
It was agreed that the indicators should be focussed at an institutional level and that there should be a limited number of indicators in order for them to be workable and useful. It was also agreed that when developing transnational indicators to monitor progress on gender equality it is important to be aligned with existing monitoring systems and indicators.
The results of this workshop were used to inform Deliverable D4.15 which proposes a limited number of indicators. The choice was to build indicators that had the following main characteristics:
- Be transnational in keeping with WP4 objectives;
- Be easily implementable by the targeted institutions (RPOs, including HEIs);
- They should measure any change and progress in the development and implementation of gender equality relating to the five thematic areas of structural change.
These final qualitative indicators in D4.15 are presented in the form of two questionnaires to enable gathering two different points of view:
• A first questionnaire is designed for the targeted institutions (RPOs including HEIs), and evaluates the commitment of these institutions to gender equality and measures the qualitative achievement of their gender equality strategy.
• A second one is addressed to researchers to measure their awareness and perception of the gender equality policies implemented by their institutions.
The two questionnaires were structured around the 5 theme areas defined and outlined above with a maximum of three indicators for each theme area.


Task 5: Implementing a joint strategy for the gendering of research contents and programmes (Month 20-36)
HEA and RCN responsible

The consortium aimed to deliver this task chiefly through the organisation of a strategic seminar (MS17) designed to reach out to the organisations, actors and authorities best placed to pursue implementation of IGAR within high-level European policy-making circles.
The GENDER-NET Strategic Seminar on Gender in Research and Innovation Content took place in Brussels on 21 April 2016, hosted by the Norway House situated close the EC Berlaymont building, right after a GenPORT event at the European Parliament with STOA (Science and Technology Options Assessment) on the Gender Dimension of Technology and Science, and one day after the members of the Helsinki Group on Gender and Innovation had convened.
Arvid Hallén, Director General of the Research Council of Norway, opened the Seminar and introduced the following speakers:
• Peter Dröll, Director, Open Innovation and Open Science, DG RTD
• Ineke Klinge, Chair, H2020 Advisory Group on Gender
• Carmen Vela, State Secretary for Research, Development and Innovation, Spain
• Jane Ohlmeyer, Chair, Irish Research Council
• Anne Pépin, Director, Mission for the Place of Women at CNRS, and GENDER-NET Coordinator
Presentations were followed by a panel discussion and questions from the audience, which was chaired by Curt Rice, Rector, Oslo and Akershus University College, Norway.
The well-attended seminar was the first European-level strategic policy seminar on the topic of IGAR. Arising from this task, and from following Task 6, is Deliverable D4.16: Publish joint report on best practices on gendering research contents and programmes.
Main S&T impacts – in this case mainly policy related - of this task are the following:
• The opportunity for high-level engagement between Member States and the European Commission, and the opportunity to communicate directly to the Commission at a high level on the importance of IGAR for Europe and the contribution that GENDER-NET has made on this agenda to-date
• Awareness-building among a high-level audience of areas of promising practice (for example, legislation, integrating IGAR in a comprehensive manner throughout research funding programmes) which can be replicated elsewhere with the necessary political-institutional support.
• Support for knowledge-building among national policy-makers which can inform submissions and discussion on key areas for IGAR, such as the ERA roadmap. For example, feedback from the French Ministry with responsibility for research indicates that the seminar has already provided additional impetus to engagement on IGAR, nationally and within Europe.
• Has helped to build support for future transnational actions and collaboration on IGAR. For a number of countries the seminar has catalysed engagement in a wider network for transnational collaboration and/or potential co-funding of new initiatives, in particular through the GENDER-NET Plus ERA-NET Cofund under preparation led by CNRS, with the confirmed involvement of all organisations present on the agenda of this Stategic Seminar.


Task 6: Exploring the possibilities of joint pilot interdisciplinary gender research calls (Month 24-36)
HEA and FNRS responsible, with strong involvement of CNRS

This Task was developed with close links to WP1 Task 6, as well as WP4 Task 5, with the aim of exploring the possibilities for implementing joint pilot interdisciplinary gender research calls between national research funding agencies and organisations. A number of workshops have informed the development and completion of this task, including MS6, MS10, MS11, MS12 and MS17. Through the various workshops comprising GENDER-NET partners and observers and the input of a diverse range of expert speakers, a broad consensus emerged on the preferred content of a joint interdisciplinary gender research call.
S&T results of Task 6 include the following:
• The option of piloting a joint call with co-funding from the European Commission taken on the GENDER-NET budget was ruled out due to Commission regulations for simple ERA-NETs, and partners did not have extra funds available to launch a joint call on their own resources at stage.
• Yet partners identified a strong need for joint calls addressing both the structural dimension and the integration of sex/gender analysis into interdisciplinary research content – these themes are ‘two sides of the same coin’
• A broad understanding and consensus that a joint call for ‘pure research’ was not adequate on its own without this being complemented by associated actions and measures which help to build capacity and knowledge.
• Identification of desirable wider impacts for a joint interdisciplinary initiative. These include:
- Increase in the number of research projects that take sex and gender analysis into account
- Widespread adoption of indicators to monitor the integration of sex and gender analysis in research and funding programmes
- Embedding of knowledge of successful examples of existing initiatives promoting gender equality through institutional change
- Enhanced transnational cooperation to advance gender equality in research and innovation and thus help strengthen the European Research Area
- Enhanced understanding among high-level stakeholders of the appropriate conditions for equal opportunities in research funding and how to bring these about.

The over-arching outcome/impact of Task 6 was that GENDER-NET stimulated the creation of a new, expanded country network to explore the possibilities for building on the work of GENDER-NET, and respond to call topic SwafS-02-2016 opened in the 2016-2017 work programme for an ERA-NET Cofund: Promoting Gender Equality in H2020 and the ERA, with a EC contribution of up to € 5 million available and a project duration of 5 years.
A dedicated Task Force was constituted, led by CNRS, specifically to explore the possibilities of opening pilot joint call topics and additional activities in the framework of the newly-opened H2020 ERA-NET Cofund call topic. The result of the work carried out by the task force was presented to relevant research funders, from inside and outside GENDER-NET, during a strategic exploratory meeting organised at DG RTD in Brussels on 18-19 April 2016, which addressed more particularly possible topics for joint calls on IGAR. A rapporteur was hired to attend the meeting and support the consortium in producing an extended report on this strategic exploratory meeting.
GENDER-NET thus provided the catalyst for the consortium members to work together in parallel, outside the project, to put together a solid proposal that sought to leverage national funding among a range of European Member States (and beyond) for support for gender research and additional gender equality related activities. The submitted GENDER-NET Plus proposal has just been positively evaluated, as of December 16th 2016 and should further strengthen gender equality in research and innovation by scaling up the joint efforts started in GENDER-NET
The deliverable associated with this task is D4.16: Publish joint report on best practices on gendering research contents and programmes, and as other GENDER-NET Deliverable reports will soon be disseminated and be made downloadable from the project website here: http://www.gender-net.eu/spip.php?article55&lang=en


Task 7: Additional transnational and joint activities (Month 20-36)
CNRS and RPF responsible

As per the revised DOW stemming from the Grant Agreement amendment, Task 7 was meant to implement additional transnational and joint activities not yet foreseen at the onset of the project and would emerge from the work carried out in WP2 more specifically, and to develop a list of possible future joint activities (Milestone MS15).
RPF and CNRS studied the outcomes of the work done as part of WP2 and related GENDER-NET Deliverables, chiefly D2.8, and additional analysis of needed joint efforts, to identify a list of potential additional joint and transnational activities to be implemented either in the GENDER-NET project if feasible, or in subsequent initiatives.
MS15 thus offers a list of recommendations regarding further strategic initiatives on transnational level – which were not originally foreseen as Tasks to be developed in WP4 – but that could be designed and implemented by the network in the near future.
Among potential further activities we recommend:
• Work on mobility schemes, taking into account gender issues;
• Work on Early Career Researchers, taking into account gender issues
• Work on provisions for work-life balance as well as child and dependent care in research programmes;
• Work on the joint assessment (quantitative and qualitative) of gender differences and bias in access to research grants;
• Enlarging the mapping analysis of WP2 (and WP3) to new countries.


Task 8: Final dissemination and policy conference (Month 31-35)
MENESR and MINECO responsible, with strong involvement of CNRS

Work on Milestone MS16–Final dissemination and policy conference actually started much earlier than Month 31, with project coordinator Anne Pépin first suggesting to MENESR in fall 2014 that France be hosting country for the next edition of the European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education due to be held in September 2016, and that the GENDER-NET Final Dissemination and Policy Conference be organised in that framework, in order to maximize audience and political impact.
This proposal was well received and supported by the Cabinet, and a GENDER-NET Task Force involving Task 8 co-Leaders MINECO and MENESR, as well as WP4 co-leader CNRS (with input from RCN) was put into place. Successive remote and face-to-face meetings (e.g. in Dublin at IRC Headquarters on April 8th 2016, and in Paris at CNRS Headquarters on June 7th 2016) were organised to best prepare this key event.
The final conference of the GENDER-NET project successfully took place on the afternoon of Monday September 12th 2016, in Paris, at the University Paris Diderot, as a plenary session of the 9th European Conference on Gender equality in Higher Education co-organised by CNRS, MENESR, Université Paris Diderot and Université Sorbonne Paris Cité, with support from the L’Oréal Foundation. The GENDER-NET final conference was attended by more than 300 participants from across Europe and beyond.
As the conclusion of this three-year ERA-NET, the GENDER-NET Final Dissemination and Policy Conference was aimed to present the project’s achievements, good practices, main results and policy recommendations. The Final Conference of GENDER-NET agenda was divided into four different sections:
1. General introduction to the project by Project Coordinator Anne Pépin (CNRS) and Project Officer Luisa Mascia (DG RTD, EC).
2. A section on gender equality through structural change, to present results and conclusions on the work achieved in WP2 and WP4. This part was led by RCN, and Anke Lipinsky was invited as an expert speaker (being also part of GENDER-NET’s Expert Advisory Board of the project). The following was presented:
• Outputs and Deliverables by Task Leading Partners: Task 2 of WP2 presented by Lise Christensen (RCN), Task 3 of WP2 presented by Gabriela Obexer (WBF), and Task 4 of WP2 was presented by Gemma Tracey (ECU). Task 5 of WP2 was part of the RCN and WBF presentations, and was an issue in the open discussion following the presentations.
• Anke Lipinsky, Senior researcher, Center of Excellence Women and Science, GESIS–Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany, and member of the GENDER-NET EAB, argued that the GENDER-NET ERA-NET has achieved a major success by providing a conceptualized and transformative approach of structural change, in light of the variety of national and local contexts, concepts and challenges that are to be found in Europe. As a result, she highlighted that the GENDER-NET project had succeeded in producing tailored and responsive implementing instruments for structural change.
3. A section on the Integration of Gender Analysis into Research (IGAR) to present results and conclusion on the work achieved in WP3 and WP4. This section was led by MINECO, and Londa Schiebinger was invited as an expert speaker (being also part of GENDER-NET’s Expert Advisory Board). For this part the following was presented:
• Outputs & Deliverables by Task Leading Partners: Task 2a,b of WP3 presented by Abigail Forson (CIHR), Task 2c of WP3 presented by María Pascual (MINECO), Task 3 of WP3 presented by Ana Puy (MINECO) – including the official inauguration of the project’s online tool on IGAR to assist national/regional research funding and performing organisations with the know-how to integrate sex and gender considerations into policies, programmes, plans and strategies, and raise awareness about the importance of sex and gender in research and innovation – and Task 4 of WP3 presented by Peter Brown (IRC).
• Londa Schiebinger, Stanford University (USA), Director of the EU-US Gendered Innovations project, and member of the GENDER-NET Expert Advisory Board, participated as Invited Expert. Her presentation highlighted the following key issues:
- Recognising the important recommendations in the GENDER-NET WP3 Reports
- The need to implement programs and activities aimed specifically at training the trainers
- The need to reinforce new policy at granting agencies and for peer-reviewed Journals
- The urgent need to integrate sex and gender analysis into university curriculum
- The importance of extra funding to encourage researchers to investigate sex/gender in their research
- The need to reinforce gender-specific research, especially research that intersects gender and STEM, conducted through interdisciplinary groups that include gender experts along with natural scientists and engineers.
- Finally she expressed the need to develop a Prize for IGAR; she has already been raising money for a Gendered Innovations Prize in the US, and suggests that the same be achieved also in Europe.
• Closing & next steps, by Ana Puy (MINECO), who highlighted the work developed in WP4 of the IGAR topic, mentioned the IGAR stream in the Award scheme (D4.14) and that there were IGAR actions in the submitted ERA-NET Cofund proposal GENDER-NET Plus.
4. Roundtable on Experiences and Visions on Gender Equality and IGAR from Leading Research Performing and Research Funding Organisations. This expert roundtable involved:
• Moderator: Marcela Linková, Chair, Helsinki Group on Gender in Research and Innovation
• Viviane Willis-Mazzichi, Head of Gender Sector, Unit B7, DG RTD, European Commission
• Londa Schiebinger, Director of the Gendered Innovations project, professor at Stanford University, USA
• Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, President of the European Research Council
• Sara Moreno, Vice Rector of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain
For this last roundtable, the invited speakers were asked to answer the two following questions:
1) What issues/initiatives, among those presented today by GENDER-NET, have your own institutions already applied and which ones would be more applicable there in a near future?
2) Do you have any further suggestions to help advance gender equality and IGAR in your respective fields of work?

Beyond the project itself, the gathering enabled an international exchange between various stakeholders of Europe’s Scientific Community, as the event was purposely held as an integral part of the 9th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education (and Research), at which over 150 speakers – researchers, lecturers, students, gender equality officers and practitioners, representatives from associations, academic decision-makers, policy makers – presented their work and policies.
In addition, the major contributions and recommendations made by the GENDER-NET project were referred to several times throughout the 9th Conference, and highlighted in the final political roundtable chaired by French minister of National Education, Higher Education and Research, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem. GENDER-NET was put forward as a key transnational initiative, namely a “reference and a strategic tool for the implementation of gender equality policies within the European Research Area”, by invited plenary speaker Laura Lee Downs (Professor of Gender History, European University Institute), by Commissioner Moedas in his video address, by Spanish State Secretary Carmen Vela in her roundtable comments, and by Minister Vallaud-Belkacem in her closing speech.

Potential Impact:
The GENDER-NET was the first ever ERA-NET to be dedicated to the promotion of gender equality in research, and a pioneering joint effort that has broken new ground at national and EU levels, and impacted the EU scene.
By joining forces, with support from the European Commission, national programme owners involved in GENDER-NET have achieved work of considerable breadth, relevance and practical usefulness, as many external observers have highlighted.
The committed GENDER-NET consortium partners, coming from 13 different countries located across Europe and beyond (Canada and the USA), have developed and proposed innovative common pathways to increase policy support for gender equality in academia and research, and have effectively contributed to reducing fragmentation across the ERA.
GENDER-NET partners have mutually opened their programmes, carried out detailed mappings and analyses of existing national and institutional initiatives and increased shared knowledge, produced synthesis reports, drafted research-based recommendations, proposed common indicators for measuring state-of-play and progress, developed practical training manuals and online tools, and implemented pilot joint transnational initiatives, in order to help EU Member States, research-performing organisations (RPOs) including universities, and research-funding organisations (RFOs) better address the common structural barriers to gender equality still present in research institutions, and the limited integration of sex and gender analysis into research contents and programmes which hinders research quality as well as the full potential for innovation.
Indeed, in its 3 years of activity, the GENDER-NET ERA-NET has proven to be a reference network and a strategic instrument for the implementation of Priority 4 of the European Research Area (Gender equality and gender mainstreaming in research), and of national ERA roadmaps.
An achievement more prominently acknowledged in the Conclusions that the Council of the European Union adopted on December 1st 2015 on “Advancing Gender Equality in the European Research Area” which follow several of GENDER-NET’s recommendations and explicitly refer to the project, and also acknowledged more recently, by the French and Spanish ministers and other high-level policy-makers at the 9th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education hosted by France on 12-14 September 2016, as well as by European Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation Carlos Moedas himself on several occasions.
While, due to its topic and CSA nature, GENDER-NET has had limited direct socio-economic impact, its wider societal implications are potentially considerable, precisely due to its topic – gender equality in research and higher education – and its strong policy orientation.

With respect to impact at European-level, apart from the key achievements mentioned above, the following direct impacts that GENDER-NET has had are worth highlighting:
Through its strategic seminars, workshops, through active liaising, and through high-level dissemination events such as the June 2015 EC Conference “A new Start of Europe: Opening up to an ERA of Innovation”, GENDER-NET has influenced key research policy-makers, such as the European Research Council, Science Europe, the European League of Research Universities (LERU), NordForsk, and the European Commission itself, as their leaders and key policy officers have expressed to GENDER-NET project coordinator and partners.
More particularly, GENDER-NET has had a strong impact on Science Europe – which gathers national RFOs and RPOs from across Europe – and on the work carried out by its Working Group on Gender & Diversity, to which several GENDER-NET members, including ERA-NET coordinator CNRS, participate and which is chaired by GENDER-NET Observer FWF. GENDER-NET has also influenced the role of Gender Champion that GENDER-NET partner IRC’s Director has recently been assuming within the Science Europe Board.
Likewise, GENDER-NET has had a key influence on NordForsk, the organisation that facilitates and provides funding for Nordic research cooperation and research infrastructure, and became a GENDER-NET Observer in 2015, and which has launched a new joint initiative on the promotion of gender equality in research and innovation tackling the “Nordic Paradox”, consisting of three parts: a research programme – From words to action; The Nordic She Figures, and the Roadmap to Impact.
The findings of GENDER-NET have also informed the GEAR (Gender Equality in Academia and Research) online toolkit developed by the European Institute for Gender Equality (EIGE) in collaboration with the EC’s DG Research & Innovation, to help RPOs implement gender equality plans, and which was launched last October 20th 2016. Several of the reports and tools developed by GENDER-NET (e.g. our online tool for IGAR and related introductory video) are explicitly referred to and embedded in the online GEAR tool.
Of course, GENDER-NET has also made a direct impact on such advisory groups as the ERAC-related Helsinki Group on Research and Innovation (through members MENESR, MINECO, RCN, RPF, MESS, a through invited talks given by the GENDER-NET project coordinator), and the H2020 ad hoc Advisory Group on Gender chaired by Ineke klinge, whose work on improving the integration of the gender dimension in research contents and programmes has benefitted from the tools and checklists on IGAR developed by GENDER-NET.
The practical guidelines, checklists, precise recommendations for policy implementation, and common indicators developed by GENDER-NET on the topics of IGAR, have indeed the potential to make a real change in the understanding of the issues at stake with regard to the integration of sex and gender analysis into research contents, and in the better implementation of this component of ERA priority n°4 into research projects and programmes, including in H2020 and the future Framework Programme.
And finally, a call topic for an ERA-NET Cofund scheme, specifically dedicated to extending the essential work carried out by the GENDER-NET ERA-NET, was included in the 2016 Horizon 2020 SwafS workprogramme.
Several GENDER-NET members, led by CNRS and joined by other national organisations, responded to that call with the GENDER-NET Plus proposal, which has just been positively evaluated (as per the Letter of invitation to grant preparation sent to project coordinator CNRS by the European Commission on December 16th 2016) and should further strengthen gender equality in research and innovation across the EU by scaling up the joint efforts started in GENDER-NET. GENDER-NET Plus proposal gathers 16 national-level research funders, has a planned total budget above 11 Million euros.

The project has also had some very positive impacts at national level, as experienced by GENDER-NET partners and observers.
The improvement – and for some lesser-experienced national programme owners and managers, the actual development and first implementation – of national and regional programmes and initiatives, is indeed a significant added value of the GENDER-NET project.
Among countries that have most positively been impacted at policy-level by GENDER-NET, we can cite the following:

France:
Both the Ministry in charge of Research (MENESR) and the largest public basic research organisation in Europe, CNRS, were actively involved in GENDER-NET, and its influence on national policies is undeniable.
France has shown great leadership in the promotion of gender equality in higher education and research since 2012, and the successive annual roadmaps for equality adopted by MENESR since then have underscored the necessary coordination of national policies with European policies.
GENDER-NET has been namely integrated as a priority initiative in the Ministry’s roadmap for equality, and GENDER-NET findings have directly influenced the drafting of the national ERA roadmap (e.g. strengthening the objectives for gender equality and gender integration in research, the development of trainings, and the development of public policies promoting systemic structural change), and the drafting and implementation of policies, guidelines and concrete measures affecting French RPOs, RFOs and our national research-evaluation higher authority.
Some of these measures were announced by French Minister of National Education, Higher Education and Research Najat Vallaud-Belkacem at the closing ceremony of the 9th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education on September 14th 2016, in a speech in which she explicitly referred to GENDER-NET as to a key strategic tool and reference for the implementation of gender policies in the ERA, and a reference that prompted her to go even further, in particular by supporting the ERA-NET Cofund proposal coordinated by CNRS and already involving the French National Research Agency (ANR).
CNRS has indeed played an instrumental role in rendering possible the organisation of the 9th European Conference on French soil; a conference which has received the highest number of proposed abstracts since the creation in 1998 of these European Conferences on Gender Equality in Higher Education, and registered over 310 participants for its scientific programme which featured the final GENDER-NET conference (i.e. the limit fixed by our hosting capacities), and attracted more than 400 people to its closing political conference hosted at the prestigious Collège de France and organised under the direct leadership of the Ministry’s Cabinet. Indeed, for the first time in the history of these conferences, a high-level political sequence, organised by the Cabinet, with the presence of leading European political figures and experts, concluded such a conference.
And finally, France has strongly committed to pursuing the GENDER-NET efforts and increasing its impact through the GENDER-NET Plus ERA-NET Cofund proposal, and CNRS has taken the lead on the project coordination.

Spain:
GENDER-NET has had an influence at the highest level at the Secretariat of State in charge of research.
In particular, following the Strategic Seminar on IGAR, Carmen Vela (the State Secretary for Research, Development and Innovation) and Marina Villegas, (Director General of Scientific and Technological Research) decided to advance to June 2016 the implementation of one specific measure from the ES ERA Road Map 2016-2020 which is related to information on how to evaluate IGAR targeted for Peer Reviewers/Evaluators of project proposals (following GENDER-NET IGAR recommendations). Consequently the UMyC prepared a Factsheet to facilitate the evaluation of IGAR (in research project proposals). This Factsheet presents key concepts and considerations on IGAR as well as a the Peer Reviewers/Evaluators checklist and some IGAR useful references (including GENDER-NET tools) in order to facilitate the evaluation of IGAR in the project proposals submitted to the 2016 call for proposals under the State Plan for R&I 2013-2016.
The Factsheet was prepared and disseminated to Peer Reviewers/Evaluators in 4 versions, each one with specific example adapted to a main field of knowledge included in each of the 4 technical project management departments of the State Plan for Research & Innovation (the Spanish factsheets can be downloaded from the MINECO-UMyC website here: http://www.idi.mineco.gob.es/portal/site/MICINN/menuitem.8ce192e94ba842bea3bc811001432ea0/?vgnextoid=09084e69155b5510VgnVCM1000001d04140aRCRD):
1) Humanities and Social Sciences
2) Life Sciences
3) Environment
4) Information and Communications technology

Norway:
One obvious result of RCN participation in the GENDER-NET consortium is the commitment to take part in the follow up through the GENDER-NET Cofund application with a contribution of 10 MNOK.
In general, it is hard to measure the impact of the involvement in GENDER-NET directly, in a Norwegian national context. For decades RCN has been active on policy level, both nationally and internationally, in promoting gender equality and the gender dimension in research, by funding specific initiatives and programmes, such as the BALANSE-programme. The impact of the RCN involvement in the GENDER-NET project could in general terms be described as strengthening the national work and efforts.
However, the most important added value of taking part in an international consortium like GENDER-NET is of course the opportunity of mutual learning by sharing experience and practice and establishing networks. This is important on a national level, and also transnationally, by bringing about new knowledge and a basis for improved policies to reach common goals.
• During GENDER-NET, the BALANSE-programme has been extended from a 5 to 10 years funding period – until 2022. Some of the coming calls will have a stronger emphasis on supporting international cooperation.
• BALANSE/RCN has contributed to the new Nordic programme Solving the Gender Paradox (NordForsk) and the funding of two new Nordic Centres of Excellence.
• In 2016 RCN launched a new Recruitment policy, where gender is an important element. In the implementation of the policy, lessons learned through the work on gender equality and structural change are very valuable, specifically the identified weaknesses and challenges in mobility schemes.
• The commitment of the RCN Director General Arvid Hallén at the strategic seminar on IGAR in Brussels (April 2016) is an important support to further efforts of improving the implementation of policy ambitions.
• The documentation of status and promising practices supporting the gender dimension in some countries and RFOs are highly valuable and inspiring for developing and concretization of RCN policy and practice on IGAR. Training schemes to raise attention and knowledge among RCN staff and board are being planned.
• For the Kif committee it has been particularly important to learn about award schemes. The committee has found this really inspirational and are discussing the possibility of similar schemes in Norway.

Ireland:
HEA-IRC has sought to leverage maximum impact for Ireland as a result of its participation in GENDER-NET and in the communication and dissemination of project findings and results. Among the wider impacts are the following:
• Wider awareness within research performers of the importance of addressing the sex/gender dimension as part of applications to national schemes and Horizon2020. GENDER-NET has supported the development of greater expertise and knowledge within research support functions in RPOs (e.g. through dissemination of GENDER-NET’s IGAR tools and resources)
• The IRC will be reviewing its core funding schemes and its current gender strategy (2013-2020). GENDER-NET outputs and resources will inform the further development of our schemes and priority areas for focus in the 2nd period of implementation of our gender strategy
• Enhanced impact on policy development in other research funding agencies, including Science Foundation Ireland (who submitted a request to join GENDER-NET, and eventually withdrew for internal reorganisation reasons) and the Health Research Board.
• Input into the work of the Expert Group on gender equality in Ireland’s higher education institutions , in particular in relation to the range of emerging practice in Europe to address both gender equality and IGAR
• Informing of dialogue, both formal and informal between HEA-IRC and institutional leaders including Heads of Research on gender equality progress locally, regionally and at the research system level
• Contributing to the development of greater emphasis on the evidence base for gender equality and IGAR for Ireland, drawing on national data but also the extensive range of data available through the Horizon2020 applications/project database. GENDER-NET has helped HEA-IRC to identify a range of data to analyse in comparing the relative performance of Ireland versus other countries and the EU as a whole
• GENDER-NET has provided partners, including HEA-IRC with a strong and durable network comprising considerable expertise and experience across both the structural equality and IGAR agendas. This network has catalysed HEA-IRC’s strategic interest and intent to further develop transnational development and cooperation through participation in the GENDER-NET Plus proposal under H2020 SwafS.
• GENDER-NET has positively influenced HEA-IRC’s ongoing communications on gender equality and the contribution of women to science, leading to the development of new activities and ‘stories’ promoted on social media and through our website.
• Informing linkages with Europe-wide groups such as Science Europe. The Director of the IRC is a member of the Board of Science Europe and is also ‘Gender Champion’, providing a link between the Gender Diversity Working Group and the Board. Participation by IRC in a transnational project that is GENDER-NET assists the Council Director in carrying out the gender champion role.

Switzerland
• The GENDER-NET Project had an impact on the Swiss federal Programme P-7 on Equal Opportunity and University Development coordinated by swissuniversities (https://www.swissuniversities.ch/en/organisation/projekte-und-programme/p-7/) and its Module A: Gender Actions Plans 2017-2020 of the Swiss higher education/research institutions (HEI/RI).
• The GENDER-NET D2.6 report served as a valuable resource for the HEI/RI in order to have an overview of the existing "good practices“ at European level, which could be used for the submission of their new project applications for 2017-2020.
• The Model of Transformative Gender Equality Action Plan (T-GAP, developed by the INTEGER project, also coordinated by GENDER-NET coordinator CNRS, and highlighted in the D2.6 Report), was mentioned in the “Call for Applications” mentioned above as promising practice that HEI institutions could take into account.
• Dr. Anke Lipinsky, a member of the GENDER-NET Expert Advisory Board acted as an expert in the evaluation process 2016.
• Main dissemination activities are listed Annex A « List of all dissemination activities”.
• The GENDER-NET results will be taken into consideration in the evaluation process of the federal equality programmes in the higher education sector in Switzerland.

In particular, the tailored gender equality trainings developed by GENDER-NET for the specific contexts of Slovenia and Cyprus, two of the lesser-advanced countries on the topics of gender equality and IGAR within the consortium, has helped to significantly raise awareness and understanding, and build capacity among research and academic decision-makers.

And clearly, GENDER-NET has influenced projects undertaken, and programmes and policies implemented, by GENDER-NET Partners, Observers and EAB members themselves, including in such organisations as the Czech TA CR, the Swedish Research Council, or else Canadian NSERC.

During the course of project, the GENDER-NET project coordinator, as well as project partners, engaged in large number of strategically-chosen dissemination activities, which are listed in Template A2 below, and have been filled online, and which have also been listed and sorted (under internal events, national events, or European of international activities) in both periodic reports.
Our latest project Deliverables will be widely disseminated early 2017, once they have been formatted in the publishable templates, and the project websites (main one, IGAR online tool, and IGAR interactive map) will be maintained until 2020 as a minimum.

Results have been exploited as much as possible during the project’s life, and the GENDER-NET legacy will continue thereafter, via the project websites, in the different national and European networks, committees and advisory boards GENDER-NET partners and observers participate to, in Member States ERA roadmaps, and of course, in the framework of the upcoming GENDER-NET Plus ERA-NET Cofund scheme, as well as, hopefully, in definition of key priorities for the 9th EU Framework Programme.

List of Websites:
The address of the GENDER-NET project is the following: http://www.gender-net.eu.
The website has been designed to be both informative and serve as a contact point. It showcases the GENDER-NET project (project overview including background, aims and strategy; consortium, including beneficiaries, observers and Expert Advisory Board members; decision-making and management structure; workplan), available resources (project deliverables, dissemination materials, useful links, publications which mention GENDER-NET) as well as relevant news and events concerning project meetings, workshops and other related events. A search engine is also included, and the project website hosts an intranet for project partners. The contact page also allows visitors to send a message directly.
In parallel, the GENDER-NET IGAR Tool website, available on http://igar-tool.gender-net.eu provides information on the project itself, while specifically assisting research funding and research performing organisations, as well as researchers and peers reviewers/evaluators, with the integration of sex and gender considerations into policies, programmes, and projects, and to raise awareness about the importance of sex and gender in research and innovation (online version of the results presented in our D3.11 Deliverable report “Manuals with guidelines on the integration of sex and gender analysis into research contents, recommendations for curricula development and indicators”). This website also offers a system that enables to stay in touch (“Stay informed” tool) used to collect the emails of the visitors who would want to be informed of all relevant news. A satellite website is dedicated specifically an interactive map presenting results from related Deliverables D3.9 and D3.10: http://igar-map.gender-net.eu/en/map
The contact details of all GENDER-NET partners are available on the main project website, and the official contact is that of the project coordinator, indicated on all above-mentioned websites:
Anne Pépin
Director, Mission pour la place des femmes au CNRS
Centre national de la recherche scientifique
3 rue Michel-Ange, 75016 Paris, FRANCE
Tel: +33 (0)1 4 96 53 39
Mob: +33 (0)6 72 45 98 87
E-mail: anne.pepin@cnrs.fr ; mission.femmes@cnrs.fr

In addition, all Partners’s websites display a link towards the GENDER-NET project website.

Related information

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CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE CNRS
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