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Valorization of sugar beet pulp by solid state fermentation: proteins and probiotics

The project involves the valorization of sugar beet pulp by solid state fermentation (SSF) leading to promising potential for the production and commercial utilization of proteins and probiotics. Protein enrichment of sugar beet pulp SSF with filamentous fungi and the development of a microbial feed additive with probiotic characteristics were examined. Work included enzyme extraction and purification studies, as well as studies covering applications in baking and animal nutrition. A novel solid state fermentation system was developed, from which improved xylanases have been obtained.

It was found that the fermenter developed for fermentations using wheat bran based substrates can also be profitably used for sugar beet pulp based substrates. A flexible multi substrate fermenter design is, therefore, available for industrial development. Further studies were carried out on the new fermenter and a humidification system has now been installed. Solid state fermentation on a wheat bran based substrate gave good results. Several Aspergillus strains were used to produce xylanase enriched enzyme preparations which could be used to improve the quality of wheat flour for breadmaking. The production of Trichoderma reesei xylanase and Aspergillus niger beta glucanase has also been developed satisfactorily. Breadmaking tests showed xylanase was more effective than existing commercial enzymes (it is suggested SSF gives a range of secondary enzymic activities different from those obtained by the usual submerged fermentation processes). Preliminary tests showed that the same enzyme could be valuable as a bromate replacer. Studies of the efficacy of xylanase and beta-glucanase supplementation in wheat and barley diets for pigs and chickens have been carried out. Nutrition tests showed that the enzymes improve feed digestibility of barley and wheat based diets. Fermented sugar beet pulp using a strain of Aspergillus niger has been tested for animal nutrition and has been found to have a nutritional value significantly improved when compared to non-fermented pulp.

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Générale Sucrière
25 avenue Franklin D Roosevelt
75008 Paris
France
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