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FP5

ZENITH Résumé de rapport

Project ID: QLK1-CT-2001-00168
Financé au titre de: FP5-LIFE QUALITY
Pays: France

Effect of zinc supplementation on in vitro Cu-induced oxidation of low-density lipoproteins in late middle-aged French subjects

Zn has been shown to possess antioxidant properties in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the antioxidant effects of Zn supplementation in late middle-aged and elderly subjects. As inadequate dietary Zn intake has been reported in these populations, Zn supplementation may protect against oxidative stress and thereby limit the progression of degenerative diseases in such populations.

We conducted this study to evaluate the long-term supplementation effects of two moderate doses of Zn on in vitro Cu-induced LDL oxidation in both men and women. Three groups of 16 healthy late middle-aged subjects from each sex participated in the study. Each group received, for six months either 0mg/d, 15mg/d or 30mg/d of supplemental Zn. At the beginning and at the end of the supplementation period, dietary intakes of Zn, Cu, Fe and vitamin E were estimated using 4-d food-intake records (including the weekend) and the GENI program as well as their status. In vitro LDL oxidizability (conjugated diene content on extraction, and rate of diene formation and lag time on application of oxidant stress) and lipid parameters were also determined at the beginning and at the end of the supplementation period.

Dietary intakes of Zn, Cu, Fe and vitamin E were overall satisfactory. Zn supplementation significantly increased serum Zn levels but did not modify significantly Cu, Fe or vitamin E status. However, Zn supplementation had no effect on in vitro LDL oxidation parameters not were there any sex-related differences in vitro LDL oxidizability. This study showed that long-term Zn supplementation in late middle-aged subjects had no effect on in vitro Cu-induced LDL oxidation under the study conditions.

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Charles COUDRAY, (Researcher)
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