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FP5

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Project ID: IST-2000-29685
Finanziato nell'ambito di: FP5-IST
Paese: United Kingdom

Biosensors: The adsorption of genetically-modified azurin on single crystal faces of gold was examined by AFM, STM and electrochemistry

The adsorption of genetically-modified azurin on single crystal faces of gold was examined by AFM, STM and electrochemistry (Davis et al., Chem. Commun., 2003, 576-577).

This work was extended to include another copper protein, plastocyanin. Images of individual molecules were observed and the rate of electron transfer measured (Andolfi et al., J. Electroanal. Chem., 2004, 565, 21-28). A method of using gold electrodes, surface-modified with cysteine-containing peptides allowed electrochemical investigations of pseudoazurin and permitted a brief examination of its interaction with a nitrite reductase, (Astier et al., Electroanalysis, 2004, 16, 1155-1165).

This was extended (Astier et al., ChemPhysChem., 2005, 6, 1114-1120) showing that this system provides a method of analysis for the nitrite anion in the micromolar range. This work demonstrated that one could gain an intimate knowledge of the mode of adsorption of a key electron transfer protein and then use this knowledge to fashion a sensor, in this case for nitrite, employing an enzyme for which the latter was a substrate.

Of course, in order to translate this into a commercial sensor, there are many developments that need to occur, e.g., regarding the nature of the electrode, the stability of the proteins etc. However, in principle, an enzyme electrode in which the sole working entities are biomaterials has been demonstrated. To be capable of development, an industrial partner is necessary: the device chosen may not be a nitrite sensor but the lessons are transferable.

It has been particularly valuable to interact with our other partners, particularly Professors Canters and Cannistrato.

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Reported by

University of Oxford
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
OX1 3QR Oxford
United Kingdom