Servicio de Información Comunitario sobre Investigación y Desarrollo - CORDIS

FISH results of infant faeces in first year of life

Preweaning period:

There are many differences in diet and lifestyle characteristics across Europe. These may influence the development of the infant gut microbiota and its metabolism. The aim of this work was to determine the faecal microbiota composition of 606 young infants coming from 5 European countries with different lifestyle characteristics, and to correlate this composition to different socio-demographic parameters, as well as to way of delivery, feeding method and antibiotic treatment.

Faecal samples obtained from 6-weeks old infants were analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation combined with flow cytometry (FISH-FC) with a panel of 10 rRNA targeted group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for assessment of the microbiota composition. The Bifidobacterium genus was predominately detected (40% average proportion of total bacteria), followed by Bacteroides (11.4%) and enterobacteria (7.5%).

Large differences were observed between countries in the composition of the infant gut, as well as a north-south gradient, opposing high bifidobacteria and low diversity faecal microbiota in the North and early diversification and high Bacteroides proportions in the South. Spain was the most different, while Germany was the closest to the average microbiota composition observed. Bifidobacteria largely dominated among breast-fed infants, while formula-fed babies presented significantly higher proportions of Bacteroides, and members of the Clostridium coccoides and Lactobacillus groups.

Vaginally delivered newborns presented higher proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Atopobium cluster compared to those born by Caesarean section, having higher proportion of members of the Clostridium coccoides and Streptococcus groups. Infants receiving antibiotic treatment presented significantly higher proportions of enterobacteria, while when mothers received antibiotics during pregnancy, newborns presented lower proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Atopobium cluster.

Weaning and post-weaning period:

With the introduction of the first solid foods in the infant diet, the faecal microbiota changes and weaning is a critical stage in gut development. The aim of this work was to determine the faecal microbiota composition of infants from 5 European countries with different lifestyle characteristics (Sweden, Scotland, Germany, Italy and Spain) one month after weaning, and to comparatively assess the impact of geographic origin as well as way of delivery, feeding method, and perinatal antibiotic treatment.

Faecal samples obtained from 605 infants 4 weeks after the introduction of first solid foods were analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation combined with flow cytometry using a panel of 10 rRNA targeted group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes. The Bifidobacterium genus (36.5% average proportion of total detectable bacteria), Clostridium coccoides group (14%) and Bacteroides (13.6%) were predominant after weaning.

Northern-European countries were associated with higher proportions of bifidobacteria in infant gut microbiota while higher Bacteroides and lactobacilli characterized southern countries. Beyond the country of birth that led to a north-south gradient, several factors that influenced the microbiota at 6 weeks (formerly assessed for the same infants) had a persistent effect after weaning.

The initial feeding method influenced the C. leptum group and C. difficile + C. perfringens species, and bifidobacteria still dominated after weaning among initially breast-fed infants, while formula-fed babies presented significantly higher proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Clostridium coccoides group. The way of delivery influenced changes in proportions of Bacteroides and Atopobium. No impact of perinatal antibiotic treatment was still observed after weaning.

Información relacionada

Reported by

INRA
INRA, UEPSD
78350 Jouy-en-Josas
France
See on map
Síganos en: RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube Gestionado por la Oficina de Publicaciones de la UE Arriba