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Mechanisms by which interfacial layers control lipolysis on digestion

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 220570

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 April 2008

  • End date

    31 March 2010

Funded under:

FP7-PEOPLE

  • Overall budget:

    € 169 390,93

  • EU contribution

    € 169 390,93

Coordinated by:

QUADRAM INSTITUTE BIOSCIENCE

English EN

Can foods be redesigned for improved digestion?

With rates of obesity shooting up across the EU, quality of life is compromised and health care is burdened. In light of this, designing healthier foods to control fat uptake is a top priority.

Health
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There is a strong correlation between a fatty diet and obesity, which raises the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and even some types of cancer. The study of digestion can help in the development of healthier foods, which will ward off the dangerous effects of bad eating habits before obesity sets in. The 'Mechanisms by which interfacial layers control lipolysis on digestion' (Lipogest) project aimed to determine the factors influencing the breakdown of fat by lipases (lipolysis). Specifically, researchers examined what effects the interfacial make-up and structures of food emulsions have on lipolysis. Lipogest developed new methods to discover the physicochemical processes taking place during digestion, and then to study how digestion (acid pH, bile salts, enzymes, phospholipids and body temperature) alters the structure of protein networks. Results of studies using atomic force microscopy and interfacial science methods revealed how interfacial structures can be modified to reduce the rate of lipolysis and activate the physiological responses needed to moderate fat consumption. Lipogest's work has highlighted the value of taking a fundamental physical approach to a biological problem. This sets the foundation for enhanced design of food emulsions by manipulating natural food-based nanostructures. This will ultimately control lipolysis, induce satiety and lower dietary fat intake.

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 220570

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 April 2008

  • End date

    31 March 2010

Funded under:

FP7-PEOPLE

  • Overall budget:

    € 169 390,93

  • EU contribution

    € 169 390,93

Coordinated by:

QUADRAM INSTITUTE BIOSCIENCE

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