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EU contest for young scientists

The Greek city of Thessaloniki is a place where philosophers, mathematicians and scholars have been pondering the questions that underlie modern science for centuries. This month will be no exception as around 80 young European scientists will gather for the eleventh European ...
The Greek city of Thessaloniki is a place where philosophers, mathematicians and scholars have been pondering the questions that underlie modern science for centuries. This month will be no exception as around 80 young European scientists will gather for the eleventh European Union contest for young scientists held during the week of 19 to 26 September 1999.

The contest is an annual showcase of the best of European student scientific achievement. Only projects that have won top national prizes can compete, and for many young scientists it represents the ultimate goal. A science exhibition will run parallel to the event, displaying all 58 of the competing scientific projects.

The entries cover a broad range of scientific topics, ranging from research into asteroids and gnomons to DNA, volcanoes and the protection of the environment. Gene manipulation has been attempted, as has producing 'nuclear' energy from peaches.

The event is organised under the EU's Improving Human Potential programme managed by the European Commission's Directorate-General for Science, Research and Development.

An international jury of 14 scientific personalities will decide which three entries are worthy of winning first prize, worth 5000 euro. There are three second prizes worth 3000 euro, and three third prizes of 1500 euro. In addition some candidates will be chosen to represent the EU at the Stockholm International Youth Science Seminar where they will have the opportunity to meet Nobel Laureates at the Nobel Prize ceremonies, as well as the International Youth Science Forum in London.

For the first time this year there are special awards where young scientists may be chosen to join distinguished research scientists to work on projects organised by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, the European Northern Observatories, the Norwegian Polar Institute and the Royal Geographical Society. Former contest winners will award an alumni prize.

The Greek President, Constantinos Stefanopolos; Director-General of the European Commission's DG XII, Jorma Routti and the Director of the Improving Human Potential programme, Achilleas Mitsos, will attend the opening ceremony on 22 September.

Source: European Commission, DG XII

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