Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

European Parliament discusses European energy policy and environmental issues

In its plenary session meeting in Strasbourg, on 9-13 October 1995, the European Parliament discussed, among other issues, the European Union's energy policy and various environmental issues.

After considerable debate, the European Parliament approved the Commission's Green P...
In its plenary session meeting in Strasbourg, on 9-13 October 1995, the European Parliament discussed, among other issues, the European Union's energy policy and various environmental issues.

After considerable debate, the European Parliament approved the Commission's Green Paper on future European Union energy policy, but called for the Treaty on European Union to be extended to include an energy chapter at next year's Inter-Governmental Conference in order to ensure cooperation between Member States on security of supply and protection of the environment.

The Parliament also called for more research to improve the safety of nuclear power stations and to draw up common European safety standards, together with further action to improve the condition of nuclear plants in Eastern Europe. Calls for the development of a strategy for the management of nuclear waste were also backed.

Other priorities for MEPs included improved energy efficiency and more research into renewable energy. Finally, in response to growing concern about the greenhouse effect and climate change, Parliament has called for a binding programme, with a clear timetable, for reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

With regard to environmental issues, the Commission's proposal to update a 1985 Directive on environmental impact assessment was discussed. The reason for this proposed amendment is that there have been widespread differences in interpretation of the provisions of the legislation in Member States. The new approach would avoid distortions of competition, as well as adopting a uniform approach to wildlife and birds.

Parliament, however, adopted a large number of amendments designed to tighten up the rules, including a widening of the list of developments requiring compulsory assessment, such as waste incinerators and long-distance pipelines. A demand was made by Parliament that all projects financed by European Union regional and cohesion funds, which are likely to have a significant environmental impact, should also be subject to assessment. Another priority for MEPs in this area was improved public consultation.

The Parliament further adopted a Resolution (A4-206/95) on growth and the environment which calls for the introduction of an energy tax.
DE
Follow us on: RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube Managed by the EU Publications Office Top