Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

Joint Research Centre - Annual Report 1996

The European Commission has adopted the latest annual report on the Community's Joint Research Centre, presenting the Centre's research and development activities in 1996. The report (COM(97)137) will be submitted to the European Parliament, the Council and the Court of Audito...
The European Commission has adopted the latest annual report on the Community's Joint Research Centre, presenting the Centre's research and development activities in 1996. The report (COM(97)137) will be submitted to the European Parliament, the Council and the Court of Auditors, as well as to the Economic and Social Committee.

The Joint Research Centre was created in order to provide scientific and technological support to back up the formulation and implementation of Community policies. Its mission is threefold:

- Implementation of the Community's scientific research programmes;
- Carrying out of research work aimed at providing scientific and technological support to other Community policies (environment, agriculture, nuclear safety);
- Reinforcement of competitive activities through participation, on an equal footing with national entities, in the Community's research programmes, and also through the provision of fee-paying services to private and public bodies.

Presently the Centre employs 186 scientists. The total budget for 1996 amounted to ECU 273 million. The annual report provides an overview of the activities carried out in 1996, of which some of the most significant and most innovative include:

- The MARS project (Monitoring of Agriculture by Remote Sensing) provides constantly updated agronomical and meteorological data which allows the evolution of crops in Europe, and elsewhere, to be closely monitored;

- Support to the implementation of a Community Directive relating to the prevention and reduction of pollution through an integrated approach addressing air and water and soil pollution simultaneously. The best techniques available in the chemical, metallurgical and energy sectors will be defined by a specialized bureau of the JRC;

- Biomedical reference materials, indispensable in order to check and improve the precision of diagnostic tests (pregnancy, hepatitis, diabetes and certain cancers) are now certified by the JRC's Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements.

- Participation in the verification of "eurocodes" for the European construction industry, setting down the norms to which buildings must conform in order to resist vibrations from various sources (road and rail traffic, earthquakes, etc.);

- Examination of confiscated fissile materials in order to trace their origin.

With regard to the competitive approach adopted by the JRC since 1995, the JRC has bid successfully for several important research projects and a number of new clients from outside the EU institutions have been found.

Related information

Follow us on: RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube Managed by the EU Publications Office Top