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Metabolic oscillations and the 24 hour (circadian) clockwork

Objective

"We live in a ""24 hour"" culture, with transatlantic air travel and shift-work being part of normal life for many people. These types of desynchronisations (e.g. “jet-lag”) disrupt our daily physiology and are increasingly being linked to diseases such as diabetes, obesity and cancer. Daily rhythms are also impaired in the elderly, and in patients with common neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer-type and fronto-temporal dementias, meaning that clock disruption is widespread in modern society. We know that every cell in the body has its own molecular clock, allowing it to coordinate its daily activities accurately, just as we would use a clock in our daily lives. Our work has uncovered novel mechanisms about how this works and how this fundamental timing system may have evolved in primitive single-celled organisms. By understanding these basic cellular mechanisms in greater detail, we anticipate that we will gain insights into how metabolic oscillations in each cell contribute to normal physiology and therefore disease."

Field of science

  • /medical and health sciences/clinical medicine/endocrinology/diabetes
  • /medical and health sciences/clinical medicine/oncology/cancer
  • /medical and health sciences/basic medicine/physiology

Call for proposal

ERC-2011-StG_20101109
See other projects for this call

Funding Scheme

ERC-SG - ERC Starting Grant

Host institution

THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARSOF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE
Address
Trinity Lane The Old Schools
CB2 1TN Cambridge
United Kingdom
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
EU contribution
€ 1 998 056
Principal investigator
Akhilesh Basi Reddy (Dr.)
Administrative Contact
Renata Schaeffer (Ms.)

Beneficiaries (1)

THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARSOF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE
United Kingdom
EU contribution
€ 1 998 056
Address
Trinity Lane The Old Schools
CB2 1TN Cambridge
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Principal investigator
Akhilesh Basi Reddy (Dr.)
Administrative Contact
Renata Schaeffer (Ms.)