CORDIS
EU research results

CORDIS

English EN
ICT-enabled, cellular artificial liver system incorporating personalized patient management and support

ICT-enabled, cellular artificial liver system incorporating personalized patient management and support

Objective

d-LIVER applies scenario-driven development methodologies to address an unmet need for bio-artificial liver support via continuous detoxification as remote transient therapy at the Point-of-Need. The liver is a complex organ with various vital functions in synthesis, detoxification and regulation; its failure is life-threatening and the only curative treatment is transplantation. Whilst awaiting transplantation, or after liver resection, patients need to be supported with detoxification systems which, currently mainly based on filtration, do not support metabolic liver function. This can only be provided by living cells. Thus, development of ICT-enabled bio-artificial liver support systems with associated remote monitoring to assist in the treatment and management of liver patients in care settings extending from the hospital to the home is essential.d-LIVER targets sensor-based monitoring of patient health status at home, concentrating on continuous monitoring of physiological parameters and discrete measurement of a defined set of biochemical species. d-LIVER also targets remote monitoring and control of the bio-artificial liver and communication with patient sensor networks and hospital information systems. Systems will be capable of remote, secure communication of the status of both the patient and the bio-artificial liver to central clinical services such that they can schedule swift and beneficial treatment and remedial actions. In this way d-LIVER will provide fundamental advances in liver support by reducing hospitalisation costs while enhancing quality of care and, at the same time, reinforcing European leadership in Personal Health systems.In a parallel, high-risk, activity the production of human hepatocytes from pancreatic progenitor cells will be investigated. These would be ideal for use in d-LIVER systems since they may provide an unlimited supply of hepatocytes, which would overcome drawbacks associated with both primary hepatocytes and stem cells.

Coordinator

UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE

Address

Kings Gate
Ne1 7ru Newcastle Upon Tyne

United Kingdom

Activity type

Higher or Secondary Education Establishments

EU Contribution

€ 1 537 149

Administrative Contact

Helen Gallon (Ms.)

Participants (14)

Sort alphabetically

Sort by EU Contribution

Expand all

CSEM CENTRE SUISSE D'ELECTRONIQUE ET DE MICROTECHNIQUE SA - RECHERCHE ET DEVELOPPEMENT

Switzerland

EU Contribution

€ 998 209

INSTITUT FUER MIKROTECHNIK MAINZ GMBH

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 449 413

STEM CELL SYSTEMS GMBH

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 201 900

enablingMNT GMBH

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 234 300

STAR HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT GMBH

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 299 700

FRAUNHOFER GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FOERDERUNG DER ANGEWANDTEN FORSCHUNG E.V.

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 1 934 086

CHARITE - UNIVERSITAETSMEDIZIN BERLIN

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 1 100 996

DEKRA TESTING AND CERTIFICATION SAU

Spain

EU Contribution

€ 282 350

UNIVERSITAT ROVIRA I VIRGILI

Spain

EU Contribution

€ 836 266

COMMISSARIAT A L ENERGIE ATOMIQUE ET AUX ENERGIES ALTERNATIVES

France

EU Contribution

€ 1 166 597

HUMANITAS MIRASOLE SPA

Italy

EU Contribution

€ 36 000

Olivetti I-Jet

Italy

EU Contribution

€ 27 800

STIFTELSEN SINTEF

Norway

EU Contribution

€ 1 434 274

IXSCIENT LIMITED

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 419 960

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 287596

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 October 2011

  • End date

    30 September 2015

Funded under:

FP7-ICT

  • Overall budget:

    € 14 309 163

  • EU contribution

    € 10 959 000

Coordinated by:

UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE

United Kingdom