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Genomic and lifestyle predictors of foetal outcome relevant to diabetes and obesity and their relevance to prevention strategies in South Asian peoples

Objective

Despite a strong genetic component to diabetes and obesity, the rapidly rising prevalence of these disorders is due to adaptation to a changing environment. The epicentre of the ‘diabetes epidemic’ is in South Asia and this is reflected in the migrant populations in Europe. Current prevention strategies are focused on adult life and target over-nutrition in high-risk adults. However, for many population groups across the globe, these strategies ignore many key principles that underlie the increasing global prevalence of these diseases. A substantial portion of the South Asian people, living in their home countries experience nutrition deprivation, while after migration to Europe, may encounter nutritional abundance resulting in imbalance during their lifecourse. These conditions are of particular importance during foetal and early developmental stages where environmental insults may interact with genetic risk to induce ‘foetal programming’ of adult metabolic disease. Few groups have targeted early life programming as an opportunity for the prevention of diabetes/obesity in childhood and subsequent adult life and there are limited guidelines on this topic. The proposed grant will bring together a unique group of investigators in South Asia (India, Bangladesh and Pakistan) and Europe (UK, Norway, Germany and Finland) with SMEs of complementary expertise (Germany and Spain) combining prevention strategies, state-of-the-art genomics, social sciences and public health that focus on these early life predictors of disease. The major objective behind this collaborative and multi-disciplinary approach is to combine knowledge from the work packages on lifestyle, nutrition and genomics to both inform public health policy through guideline development and design a large-scale pragmatic intervention to prevent the metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes in South Asian populations aimed at early life taking into account multi-generational effects.
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Coordinator

QUEEN MARY UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

Address

327 Mile End Road
E1 4ns London

United Kingdom

Activity type

Higher or Secondary Education Establishments

EU Contribution

€ 842 092,94

Administrative Contact

Graham Hitman (Mr.)

Participants (15)

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UNIVERSITETET I OSLO

Norway

EU Contribution

€ 343 549,20

KING EDWARD MEMORIAL HOSPITAL RESEARCH CENTRE

India

EU Contribution

€ 140 404,80

BAQAI MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

Pakistan

EU Contribution

€ 80 403,60

DIABETIC ASSOCIATION OF BANGLADESH - DAB

Bangladesh

EU Contribution

€ 428 553,60

PUBLIC HEALTH FOUNDATION OF INDIA

India

EU Contribution

€ 148 425,60

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 105 177,60

LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND TROPICAL MEDICINE ROYAL CHARTER

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 16 202,40

THE UNIVERSITY OF EXETER

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 115 089,44

COUNCIL OF SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH

India

EU Contribution

€ 159 098,40

TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET DRESDEN

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 28 202,40

HELSINGIN YLIOPISTO

Finland

EU Contribution

€ 16 203,20

UNIVERSITY OF EAST LONDON

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 139 088,70

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 16 202,40

INSTRUCT AG

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 362 460,99

BAP HEALTH OUTCOMES RESEARCH SL

Spain

EU Contribution

€ 58 176,73

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 278917

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 February 2012

  • End date

    31 January 2016

Funded under:

FP7-HEALTH

  • Overall budget:

    € 4 081 992,54

  • EU contribution

    € 2 999 332

Coordinated by:

QUEEN MARY UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

United Kingdom