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Biomaterials for Tracheal Replacement in Age-related Cancer via a Humanly Engineered Airway

Biomaterials for Tracheal Replacement in Age-related Cancer via a Humanly Engineered Airway

Objective

Age-related cancers, especially of the trachea, are neoplastic lesions that significantly impact upon the lives of thousands of European patients each year. Unfortunately, most present with inoperable lesions for which median survival is less than 12 months. Based on our previous clinically successful experiences with in vivo completely tissue engineered tracheal replacement in benign tracheal diseases, we recently applied this technology in 2 patients with otherwise inoperable primary tracheal cancers. The successful observed outcome confirms the unique opportunity to scale-up an effective therapeutic approach into a widely accessible clinical technology, which could enhance not only the quality of life but even cure otherwise untreatable patients. However, a limitation of our current technology is the time it takes to re-populate the decellularized trachea. This may prove critical in the case of cancer patients. Further, the size of the transplant is currently limited due to the fact that the transplanted tissue needs to be efficiently and rapidly vascularised to prevent necrosis in vivo. To surmount these limitations, we aim to: i) improve our current technique of in vivo tissue engineering human tracheae in a small number of patients and subsequently begin a formal clinical trial, ii) develop pharmacological approaches to activate endogenous stem cells, stimulate tissue regeneration and vascularisation in situ, iii) develop a synthetic tracheal scaffold using a novel nanocomposite polymer as alternatives to natural human scaffolds and iv) develop good medical practice manufacturing process for safe, efficient and cost effective commercial production. This research project is aimed to define a robust airway implantation technique assuring a better outcome for thousands of patients each year. Moreover, we aim to use these results as a starting point to develop clinical approaches that could improve the treatment of age-related cancers of other hollow organs.
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Coordinator

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET

Address

Nobels Vag 5
17177 Stockholm

Sweden

Activity type

Higher or Secondary Education Establishments

EU Contribution

€ 1 173 842

Administrative Contact

Ylva Hultman (Ms.)

Participants (12)

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UNIVERSITAET LEIPZIG

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 181 680

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 695 800

IMPERIAL COLLEGE OF SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY AND MEDICINE

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 366 000

UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI MODENA E REGGIO EMILIA

Italy

EU Contribution

€ 400 750

AZIENDA OSPEDALIERO-UNIVERSITARIA CAREGGI

Italy

EU Contribution

€ 20 900

INSTITUT GUSTAVE ROUSSY

France

EU Contribution

€ 80 400

ROBERT KOCH-INSTITUT

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 60 000

CONSIGLIO NAZIONALE DELLE RICERCHE

Italy

EU Contribution

€ 205 428

CONSORZIO INTERUNIVERSITARIO NAZIONALE PER LA SCIENZA E TECNOLOGIA DEI MATERIALI

Italy

EU Contribution

€ 208 800

INTERCYTEX LTD

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 192 000

Pharmidex Pharmaceutical Services Limited

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 124 500

HUGO SACHS ELEKTRONIK - HARVARD APPARATUS GMBH

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 289 200

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 280584

Status

Grant agreement terminated

  • Start date

    1 April 2012

  • End date

    31 March 2017

Funded under:

FP7-NMP

  • Overall budget:

    € 5 464 792

  • EU contribution

    € 3 999 300

Coordinated by:

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET

Sweden