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Self-Enforcing E-Voting System: Trustworthy Election in Presence of Corrupt Authorities

Self-Enforcing E-Voting System: Trustworthy Election in Presence of Corrupt Authorities

Objective

"This project aims to develop a new generation of e-voting called the “self-enforcing e-voting system”. The new system does not depend on any trusted authorities, which is different from all currently existing or proposed e-voting schemes. This has several compelling advantages. First, voting security will be significantly improved. Second, the democratic process will be enforced as a whole. Third, the election management will be dramatically simplified. Fourth, the tallying process will become much faster.

The idea of a “self-enforcing” e-voting system has so far received little attention. Although several researchers have attempted to build such a system in the past decade, none were successful due to inefficiencies in computation, bandwidth and the number of rounds. My preliminary investigation indicates that a ""self-enforcing e-voting system"" is not only practically feasible, but has the potential to be the future of e-voting technology. I have identify several major research problems in the field, which need to be addressed urgently before a self-enforcing e-voting system can finally become viable for practical use. The problems span three disciplines: security, dependability and usability.

My main hypothesis is: “a secure, dependable and usable self-enforcing e-voting system will trigger a paradigm shift in voting technology”. I believe e-voting has great potential that has yet to be exploited, and this project is to develop that potential to the full. The work program involves six work packages: 1) to develop supportive security primitives to lay foundation for future e-voting; 2) to research the impact of “self-enforcing” requirement on dependability; 3) to develop assistive technologies to improve the usability in voting; 4) to design system architectures suitable for different election scenarios; 5) to build open source prototypes; 6) to conduct real-world trial elections and evaluate the full technical, social, economic and political impacts."
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Principal Investigator

Feng Hao (Dr.)

Host institution

UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE

Address

Kings Gate
Ne1 7ru Newcastle Upon Tyne

United Kingdom

Activity type

Higher or Secondary Education Establishments

EU Contribution

€ 1 484 713

Principal Investigator

Feng Hao (Dr.)

Administrative Contact

Deborah Grieves (Mrs.)

Beneficiaries (1)

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UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 1 484 713

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 306994

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 January 2013

  • End date

    31 December 2018

Funded under:

FP7-IDEAS-ERC

  • Overall budget:

    € 1 484 713

  • EU contribution

    € 1 484 713

Hosted by:

UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE

United Kingdom

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