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Prognosis and Diagnosis of Protein Misfolding Diseases by Seeded Aggregation in Microspheres

Prognosis and Diagnosis of Protein Misfolding Diseases by Seeded Aggregation in Microspheres

Objective

There is currently no early detection system for neurological protein misfolding disorders (such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases) that would satisfy the demands for rapid, quantitative, flexible, and reproducible assays to study amyloidogenesis in biological samples. We will explore the potential of aggregation assays in microdroplets that are formed in microfluidic devices. We have found that the readout of this assay reflects the disease progression, when samples of Drosophila fruit fly brains and mouse brain and serum are analysed. We will use this PoC project explore the utility of this technology to report on aggregation of amyloid precursors in human biological samples, to test whether the potential of this technology extends to patients diagnosis and prognosis. Such data would resolve the question whether our early diagnosis system is immediately useful in a medical context and strengthen the case for venture capital funding.
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Host institution

THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

Address

Trinity Lane The Old Schools
Cb2 1tn Cambridge

United Kingdom

Activity type

Higher or Secondary Education Establishments

EU Contribution

€ 149 972

Beneficiaries (1)

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THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 149 972

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 665631

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 August 2015

  • End date

    31 January 2017

Funded under:

H2020-EU.1.1.

  • Overall budget:

    € 149 972

  • EU contribution

    € 149 972

Hosted by:

THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

United Kingdom