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Designing Singlet Fission Materials Using Excited State Aromaticity

Project description

New aromatic molecules generating long-lived excitons for efficient solar cells

Most solar cells work on the same principle: a photon generates an exciton, a bound state of an electron and an electron hole, which can then be converted into electricity. Certain organic molecules can generate two excitons from a single photon, thereby increasing the amount of electricity the solar cell can produce when irradiated. A big challenge associated with this so-called singlet fission process is that organic molecules are not stable. As a result, excitons live for a very short time, making it difficult to be harnessed for electricity. The EU-funded EXAM project will take advantage of aromaticity – a property of some unusually stable organic molecules – to design stable singlet fission materials. This new design method can help increase the efficiency of solar cells.

Call for proposal

H2020-MSCA-IF-2019
See other projects for this call

Funding Scheme

MSCA-IF-EF-ST - Standard EF

Coordinator

THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARSOF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE
Address
Trinity Lane The Old Schools
CB2 1TN Cambridge
United Kingdom
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
EU contribution
€ 224 933,76