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International collaborative study of cancer risk among radiation workers in the nuclear industry

Project information

Grant agreement ID: FIGH-CT-1999-20001

  • Start date

    1 February 2000

  • End date

    31 July 2001

Funded under:

FP5-EAECTP C

  • Overall budget:

    € 200 000

  • EU contribution

    € 200 000

Coordinated by:

INTERNATIONAL AGENCY FOR RESEARCH ON CANCER

France

Objective

Radiation protection standards are mainly based on the follow-up of atomic bomb survivors and medically irradiated persons. The use of these data to predict cancer risk from protracted low doses involves uncertain extrapolations. Occupational cohort studies, such as the International Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry, have the potential to provide a direct assessment of these effects. This study covers over 500,000 individually monitored workers from 14 countries (10 from Europe, 7 from the EU). Data collection is virtually complete in most countries. Funds are requested for the international analyses, including comparisons with high dose studies and application of methods to improve the estimates of risk. These consist of models to take into account heterogeneity of risk across cohorts and errors in dose estimates, as well as biologically based models for the estimation of cancer risk.

The main objective of the International Study is to obtain precise, direct estimates of radiation-induced cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionising radiation. The specific purpose of the study is to provide data for comparison with the risk estimates derived from studies of persons having received high dose/high dose-rate exposures. This will provide a direct test of the adequacy of the extrapolation models used currently for radiation risk assessment and for the setting of radiation protection standards, and may assist in the construction of improved risk assessment models.

The main objectives of the current proposal are: to carry out the international combined analyses of data from the national studies; to carry out formal comparisons improve the estimates of radiation-induced cancer risk.

Current protection standards for environmental and occupational exposures to ionising radiation are mainly based on estimates of radiation-induced cancer risk derived from studies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The use of data from populations who have received comparatively high radiation doses over short periods to predict carcinogenic effects in populations receiving generally lower doses over longer time involves uncertain extrapolations.

In order to obtain precise direct estimates of radiation-related cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionising, radiation risk of cancer and thus to strengthen the scientific basis for setting radiation protection standards, an International Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry has been set-up, using a common core protocol. This study covers over 600 000 individually monitored workers from 17 countries (10 from Europe - 7 from the EU). The specific purpose of the study is to provide data for comparison with the risk estimates derived from studies of persons having received high dose/high dose-rate exposures. This will provide a direct test of the adequacy of the extrapolation models used currently for radiation risk assessment and for the setting of radiation protection standards, and may assist in the construction of improved risk assessment models.

The main objective of the current contract is to carry out the international combined analyses of data from the national studies, specifically:

-to implement methods to improve the estimates of radiation-included cancer risk from the International Study by taking into account errors in dose estimates
-to derive direct risk estimates of the effect of low dose protracted exposure, from the combined data using different models of risk and taking into account errors in doses and heterogeneity
-to compare them formally to risk estimates derived from high dose, high dose rate studies.

Coordinator

INTERNATIONAL AGENCY FOR RESEARCH ON CANCER

Address

150,Cours Albert-Thomas 150
69372 Lyon

France

Participants (5)

CONSEJO DE SEGURIDAD NUCLEAR

Spain

FINNISH CANCER REGISTRY

Finland

National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB)

United Kingdom

RADIATION AND NUCLEAR SAFETY AUTHORITY

Finland

UNIVERSITY OF BIELEFELD

Germany

Project information

Grant agreement ID: FIGH-CT-1999-20001

  • Start date

    1 February 2000

  • End date

    31 July 2001

Funded under:

FP5-EAECTP C

  • Overall budget:

    € 200 000

  • EU contribution

    € 200 000

Coordinated by:

INTERNATIONAL AGENCY FOR RESEARCH ON CANCER

France