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A Scalable QoS-enabled Business Grid Environment for Multi-User Real-time Online Interactive Applications

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 034601

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 September 2006

  • End date

    30 September 2009

Funded under:

FP6-IST

  • Overall budget:

    € 3 261 058

  • EU contribution

    € 2 498 000

Coordinated by:

UNIVERSITAET INNSBRUCK

Austria

Project description

Advanced Grid Technologies, Systems and Services Speed breakthrough for online gamers and e-learning <p><b>The limitations of current technology can ruin the experience for those playing sophisticated online games or taking complex e-learning courses. But what if players could harness the power of multiple computers online to create a really impressive gaming or learning experience? A revolutionary application of grid technology to computer games and e-learning offers just such a prospect. </b></p><p>No matter how much you pay to get the latest, fastest computer on the market, technology leaps ahead even further. The computer or the internet connection you have just upgraded to play high-performance online games is fine for a couple of months.</p><p>Then a new groundbreaking game is introduced and your system just cannot cope anymore. It either slows down, or keeps freezing &ndash; ruining the whole experience.</p><h3>More computing power for you!</h3><p>Online games can involve high levels of interaction between many users, with very fast information updates being passed from one computer to another over the internet. The faster the computer's reaction, the more intense the experience is for the users. However, current technology puts strict limitations on the number of users, and reaction time can sometimes be unsatisfactory.</p><p>Overcoming such limitations requires much more powerful computer systems, web servers and connections. The Edutain@GRID project team believes grid technology could provide another solution.</p><h3>How will grid technology help?</h3><p>Grid technology combines the power of many computers, which may be widely scattered over different organisations or locations. These computers are connected through a network, known as the &lsquo;grid&rsquo;, and work together as a single computing system. The grid allows a user to draw on the free processing power of any available computer on the network to perform complex tasks. </p><p>Only major academic networks (such as the one created for researchers working on the Human Genome Project) and large multinational industries currently use this technology.</p><p>The project team believes they can harness the grid concept to provide real-time reactions for both complex interactive games and online training software. They are developing the middleware (computer software that connects diverse software together) that would allow current grid technology to be used for such tasks. This middleware would automatically manage the network, enabling more users to participate online than is possible using current technology.</p><h3>What still needs to be done?</h3><p>However, further research is still required to achieve the project's goals. Grid technology needs to be adapted for program developers and &lsquo;average&rsquo; end-users to make it more user-friendly.</p><p>Grid accessibility is currently constrained by security models that are too slow for online real-time interactions among multiple users. Edutain@GRID&rsquo;s researchers are investigating more flexible approaches to this issue. The capability of increasing or decreasing the number of users with little technical intervention (scalability) on the grid will also need to be improved.</p><h3>More fun means&hellip;expanding markets</h3><p>The project&rsquo;s work is due to end in August 2009. Despite the work that remains to be done, the project&rsquo;s team has been encouraged by the progress they have achieved so far. Since 2006, Edutain@GRID's research partners have been working together across five countries to bring the benefits of grid technology to you.</p><p>Online gamers and e-learners could soon benefit by experiencing the excitement of real-time affordable action, and entertainment involving hundreds, even thousands of other users. The potential for the computer games market and for producers of interactive educational modules is enormous. </p>

Coordinator

UNIVERSITAET INNSBRUCK

Address

Innrain 52
6020 Innsbruck

Austria

Activity type

Higher or Secondary Education Establishments

EU Contribution

€ 595 031

Participants (6)

UNIVERSITAT LINZ

Austria

EU Contribution

€ 260 520

WESTFAELISCHE WILHELMS-UNIVERSITAET MUENSTER

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 354 000

DARKWORKS SA

France

EU Contribution

€ 294 180

AMIS DRUZBA ZA TELEKOMUNIKACIJE D.O.O.

Slovenia

EU Contribution

€ 222 000

BMT CORDAH LIMITED

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 270 338

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 501 931

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 034601

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 September 2006

  • End date

    30 September 2009

Funded under:

FP6-IST

  • Overall budget:

    € 3 261 058

  • EU contribution

    € 2 498 000

Coordinated by:

UNIVERSITAET INNSBRUCK

Austria