CORDIS
EU research results

CORDIS

English EN
Biological invasions: patterns and processes. An integrative approach with the Bullfrog Rana catesbeiana in Canada and Europe

Biological invasions: patterns and processes. An integrative approach with the Bullfrog Rana catesbeiana in Canada and Europe

Objective

The impact of biological invasions upon native ecosystems and human economies is now widely appreciated. The phenomenon is a major scientific challenge, the frequency of non-indigenous species introduction is inevitably increasing, and the societal concern on this topic is remarkably high. Our proposal aims to develop an integrative approach to understand the processes of invasion. Our model is the Bullfrog, which pose a particular risk to biodiversity in aquatic ecosystems of special biodiversity interest. It is now introduced in several countries in Europe and appears to expand its range.

Our proposal is to assess the mechanisms of biological and human influences playing a role in the persistence of introduced Bullfrog populations. We will use an integrate framework of data from diverse sources to propose effective biological control strategies in Europe and abroad. This will allow a rapid and efficient response when new introductions inevitably occur. Our proposal covers: A-Invasive biogeography: We will analyse Bullfrog genetic variation in Canada and Europe by the use of mitochondrial markers which allow understanding the origin and patterns of introduction events. B-Population functioning: populations are often connected in larger meta-population and the matrix (structure, distance between patches) affects colonisation and extinction processes. With modern models of genetic structuring (landscape genetics), we will estimate genetic spatial structure (with nuclear markers) and connect it with landscape feature in both native (US) and introduced populations.

C-We will compare demographic traits and build population dynamics models to assess invasiveness. Data on frog migration, human role in active/passive displacement will be collected. Our objective is to use a hierarchical Bayesian method to address the complex problem of invasion by combining these relevant anthropogenic, ecological or genetic processes to propose efficient management or eradication tools.

Leaflet | Map data © OpenStreetMap contributors, Credit: EC-GISCO, © EuroGeographics for the administrative boundaries

Coordinator

UNIVERSITé JOSEPH FOURIER GRENOBLE 1

Address

621 Avenue Centrale - Domaine Universitaire
Grenoble

France

Administrative Contact

Pierre TABERLET (Prof.)

Participants (1)

Sort alphabetically

Expand all

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA

Canada

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 22190

  • Start date

    13 August 2006

  • End date

    12 August 2009

Funded under:

FP6-MOBILITY

Coordinated by:

UNIVERSITé JOSEPH FOURIER GRENOBLE 1

France